Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (4)

8
votes
1answer
539 views

Is a weak measurement the same as an unsharp measurement or POVM?

This is prompted by the strong claims made in Science 332, 1170 (2011) to have observed trajectories of photons, "something all of our textbooks and professors had always told us was impossible". I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
206 views

Sun-Earth Virtual Gravitons?

How many virtual gravitons do the sun and earth exchange in one year? What are their wavelengths?
3
votes
0answers
2k views

Energy Levels of 3D Isotropic Harmonic Oscillator (Nuclear Shell Model)

One simple way of detailing the very basic structure of the nuclear shell model involves placing the nucleons in a 3D isotropic oscillator. It's easy to show that the energy eigenvalues are $E = ...
8
votes
2answers
599 views

The energy of a Graviton

Maybe another stupid question, but what's the energy of a graviton? Is it $\hbar \omega$? Does it emit gravitons when an apple falls onto the ground, like photons be emitted when an electron transits ...
8
votes
2answers
396 views

Quantizing EM field

Why when we quantize EM field, whe quantize the vector potential $A^\mu$ obtaining vectorial particles (photons) like the elastic field (phonons) and we can't quantize directly the EM-field tensor ...
4
votes
1answer
253 views

The Orbiting Moon as a Quantum Object

How would the quantum mechanical treatment of the moon as a gravitationally-bound object differ from the usual treatment of the hydrogen atom using Schrödinger's equation? [The earth's gravitational ...
-1
votes
1answer
332 views

purely hypothetically, could a quantum being appear to be human? I ask for the purpose of research on a novel [closed]

I am a budding novelist, and im researching a few things for a fictional narrative. the characters are from other dimensions and i want to present a coherent scientific structure. any suggestions ...
6
votes
4answers
717 views

Randomness, Chaos, Quantum mechanical probability functions

Can someone explain these 3 concepts into a unified framework. Randomness : Randomness as seen in a coin toss, where the system follows known and deterministic (at the length and scale and precision ...
5
votes
1answer
945 views

Double slit experiment - how to see an electron going through a slit?

This is my first question here. Hope it not too dull to you guys :p I found this video on youtube. After 3:24 it says if there is an observer detecting which slit the electron goes through, there ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why are two eigen-state-kets with different eigenvalues orthogonal?

The operators $J_1^2$, $J_2^2$, $J_{1z}$, and $J_{2z}$ are mutually commuting operators. Likewise, $J_1^2$, $J_2^2$, $J^2$, and $J_z$ are mutually commuting operators. The two groups are ...
3
votes
1answer
311 views

Can we have non continuous models of reality? Why don't we have them?

This question is about Godel's theorem, continuity of reality and the Luvenheim-Skolem theorem. I know that all leading physical theories assume reality is continuous. These are my questions: 1) Is ...
7
votes
2answers
774 views

What is a coherent state?

In quantum mechanics, what exactly is a coherent state, and how does it differ from other states?
-2
votes
2answers
3k views

Flow of water and flow of electrons, how this analogy works?

If flow of electrons analogy can be imagined as flow of water, how to imagine electricity, that comes in this whole picture? When plug from bottom of sink is taken out, gravity pulls water molecules, ...
1
vote
1answer
158 views

thermal energy while calculating Langevin Forces

I have a quick question from thermodynamics. I remember that we take kT/2 as the kinetic energy per degree of freedom in kinetic theory of gases. But when we do langevin forces (for example in ...
1
vote
1answer
553 views

state vector notation

I've never taken a quantum mechanics class, but I find myself now using principles developed in the quantum theory of angular momentum. One particularly confusing aspect that I'm struggling with is ...
1
vote
2answers
415 views

Can two entanglement particles satisfy at same time two different wave functions?

The wave function determines the probabilities of an outcome, and the wave function is parameterized "shaped" depending on the measurement set. i.e. two different measurement set would lead to two ...
1
vote
3answers
576 views

Is there a “Size” Cutoff to Quantum Behaviour?

We all know that subatomic particles exhibit quantum behavior. I was wondering if there's a cutoff in size where we stop exhibiting such behavior. From what I have read, it seems to me that we still ...
4
votes
3answers
714 views

Does decoherence explain all instances of wave function collapse?

Specifically, how can decoherence explain the appearance of flecks of metallic silver on a photographic plate when exposed to the very weak light of a distant star? EDIT: Perhaps the advocates of ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Imaginary time in quantum and thermodynamics

The following question is about chapter 2 of Sakurai's Modern Quantum Mechanics. I wish I could link to the Google book, but it doesn't seem to have a satisfactory preview to be able to read the ...
3
votes
1answer
274 views

Are black hole states completely mixed?

A completely mixed state is a statistical mixture with no interference terms, and (QMD, McMahon, pg 229): $$\rho = \dfrac{1}{n}I$$ $$Tr(\rho^2) = \dfrac{1}{n}$$ Are black hole quantum states ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is it valid to take the partial trace to describe a subsystem?

In derivations of decoherence, there eventually comes a point when we are asked to take the partial trace over the environment. Why should this be valid for an entangled system? Why should taking the ...
5
votes
5answers
717 views

Is the wave function objective or subjective?

Here is a question I am curious about. Is the wave function objective or subjective, or is such a question meaningless? Conventionally, subjectivity is as follows: if a quantity is subjective then ...
3
votes
1answer
208 views

Can the entropy of a subsystem exceed the maximum entropy of the system in quantum mechanics?

Quantum mechanics has a peculiar feature, entanglement entropy, allowing the total entropy of a system to be less than the sum of the entropies of the individual subsystems comprising it. Can the ...
36
votes
4answers
3k views

Trace of a commutator is zero - but what about the commutator of $x$ and $p$?

Operators can be cyclically interchanged inside a trace: $${\rm Tr} (AB)~=~{\rm Tr} (BA).$$ This means the trace of a commutator of any two operators is zero: $${\rm Tr} ([A,B])~=~0.$$ But what about ...
4
votes
3answers
813 views

Historical background of wave function collapse

I wonder what were the main experiments that led people to develop the concept of wave function collapse? (I think I am correct in including the Born Rule within the general umbrella of the collapse ...
5
votes
4answers
754 views

Quantum Physics and the Law of Large Numbers

On page 1 of this recent paper by Bousso and Susskind we read. This question is not about philosophy. Without a precise form of decoherence, one cannot claim that anything really "happened", ...
3
votes
2answers
160 views

What are the conditions for decoherence to be irreversible?

Spin echo experiments have been able to reverse the motions of all the molecules in a gas in statistical mechanics in the manner of Loschmidt. The Fermi-Ulam-Pasta model has solutions with a single ...
8
votes
1answer
648 views

A better conceptual model for cooper pairs in a superconductor

The conceptual model I have been introduced to for cooper pairs in a bulk superconductor is what I would call the "wake" model, where one electron deforms the positively charged lattice, changing the ...
5
votes
1answer
295 views

Uniqueness of quasiclassical consistent histories

The current zeitgeist here is on interpretations of quantum mechanics, so let me add my own two cents here. As you may know, consistent histories is an alternative interpretation proposed in a series ...
2
votes
1answer
196 views

Apparatus used to test violations of Bell's inequalities

I believe most people are familiar with Bell's Theorem. If I understand correctly, the violations of Bell's inequalities are possible due to the existance of entangled quantum states. Although ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Confusion between the de Broglie wavelength of a particle and wave packets

So I learned that the de Broglie wavelength of a particle, $\lambda = \frac{h}{p}$, where h is Planck's constant and p is the momentum of the particle. I also learned that a quantum mechanics ...
1
vote
1answer
228 views

interpretation of $\{H,L^2\}$

In Hamiltonian mechanics, we show $\{H,L_z\}=0$, which can be interpreted as the conservation of angular momentum around $Oz$. Following the same idea, how can we interprete $\{H,L^2\}$? Is the ...
3
votes
2answers
593 views

Does this equation mean anything?

I saw this equation on a coffee mug, and I am wondering what it means. I am not far enough along in physics to understand it. Does it actually mean anything or is it gibberish? I can't embed the ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

On the nature of the collapse of the wave function

The collapse of the wave function by measurements is one of the most mysterious properties of quantum mechanics. At what scale does the wave function collapse? What are the conditions for a ...
14
votes
6answers
2k views

Is Shor's algorithm a demonstration of the many worlds interpretation?

David Deutsch is very fond of pointing out Shor's integer factorization algorithm is a demonstration of the many worlds interpretation. As he often asked, where else did all the exponentially many ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Simple Quantum Mechanics question about the Free particle, (part2)

Continuing from my first question titled, Simple Quantum Mechanics question about the Free particle, (part1) Griffiths goes on and says, "A fixed point on the waveform corresponds to a fixed ...
3
votes
1answer
838 views

Simple Quantum Mechanics question about the Free particle, (part1)

I am reading Introduction to Quantum Mechanics by David Griffiths and I am in Ch2 page 59. He starts out writing the time dependent Schrödinger equation and the solution for $\psi(x,t)$ for the free ...
4
votes
4answers
819 views

How to calculate the quantum expectation of frequency of a particle?

I know how to calculate the expectation of < $\Psi$|A|$\Psi$ > where the operator A is the eigenfunction of energy, momentum or position, but I'm not sure how to perform this for a pure frequency. ...
-1
votes
4answers
474 views

Quantum Mechanics [closed]

Quantum Mechanics. Could anyone help me to understand the concept involved? Double slit experiment can be easily understood by Wave nature of light, but while explaining it with photons, it required ...
4
votes
4answers
6k views

Does a magnetic field arise from a moving charge or from its spin, or both?

I learned that a moving charge creates a magnetic field perpendicular to its direction of motion. I also learned that charged particles like electrons have spin and they also create a magnetic field ...
7
votes
9answers
3k views

Should I begin to study quantum mechanics or wait until I have a stronger base on easier topics? [closed]

I apologize if this is off topic since it does not relate directly to the study of physics, but I could not think of a better place to ask. I am a high school student graduating in a few days and ...
0
votes
0answers
107 views

Can space-like fields not commute and still forbid faster-than-light signalling? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is microcausality necessary for no-signaling? If we try to measure two non-commuting observables, only the earlier measurement would be valid. The later measurement ...
14
votes
8answers
2k views

What is an observer in quantum mechanics?

My question is not about (pseudo) philosophical debate; it concerns mathematical operations and experimental facts. What is an observer? What are the conditions required to be qualified of observer, ...
4
votes
4answers
620 views

Where is the particle during a tunneling event?

If, say, a particle with energy $E<V_0$, approaches a finite potential barrier with height $V_0$, and happens to tunnel through, where would the particle be during the time period when it is to the ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Wavefunction normalization

How do we normalize a wavefunction that's a linear combination of sines and cosines (or of $Ae^{ikx}+Be^{-ikx}$ -- they're the same, right)? One you square it, wouldn't the integrand be oscillating ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Degeneracy of states in mixed infinite square well, harmonic oscillator

I'm trying to determine the degeneracy of states given by $g(\epsilon)=g_{0} \epsilon$ for a system that is trapped in a quite specific potential. In two dimensions, the particle has a potential as ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

Scattering vs bound states

Why are these states called as such, and how do they differ? I vaguely understand that when $E > 0$ you obtain a scattering state, but when $E < 0$ you have a bound state.
1
vote
2answers
545 views

Why is $\frac{dx}{dt}=0$ in this average momentum calculation?

In the following excerpt from S. Gasiorowicz's Quantum Physics, he derives an expression for the average momentum of a free particle. $\psi(x,t)$ is the wave function of a free particle, $\psi^*$ ...
1
vote
1answer
733 views

Weyl exponential form of the Canonical Commutation Relations

What is the physical meaning of the $c$-numbers $Q, P\in \mathbb{R}$ in the exponent of the Weyl system $\exp\left[\frac{i}{\hbar} Q \hat{p}\right]$ and $\exp\left[\frac{i}{\hbar}P\hat{q}\right]$? ...
2
votes
2answers
360 views

German book on introductory quantum mechanics [closed]

I'm looking for an originally German introduction to quantum mechanics. Is there such a canonical book used in German QM undergraduate courses?