2
votes
3answers
42 views

Demonstration that vibrating basic particles constitute non-vibrating individuals

I am a dilettante in physics; I ask for pardon for my confusion-causing (if any) terminology usage, and also for my imprecise choice of question tags. I know that basic particles of any individual ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

Atoms and their bonds in an explosion

I was watching a video and when the car did blow up I asked to me... what happens with the atoms and their bonds when an object blows up of this way? what is the behavior of the atoms and their bonds ...
6
votes
2answers
214 views

Why do electrons in an atom 'fall' back to the ground state?

Why, after absorbing a photon does an atom's electron 'fall' back to its ground state (what causes it to immediately lose its absorbed energy)?
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Mathematical description of electron configuration

Does there exist a mathematical model for determining the electron configuration of an atom? I mean the theory which would generalize the notion behind the informal elements of the Aufbau principle.
0
votes
1answer
125 views

Expectation value of energy from the position state of hydrogen atom [closed]

I was given with the position state of hydrogen atom: $$ R_{21} =\left(\sqrt{\frac{1}{3}}Y^0_1 + \sqrt{\frac{2}{3}}Y^1_1\right) $$ I am getting confused about getting the expectation value of ...
3
votes
2answers
96 views

Electron speed in Atoms

Is the speed of electrons in Atoms consistent in all Atoms or clusters/groups/individual elements, and if it is consistent in any atom, is that speed constant?
1
vote
2answers
93 views

Hydrogen atom: potential well and orbit radii

I happened to open up an old solid-state electronics book by Sah, and in it he says: "it is evident that the electron orbit radius is half the well radius at the energy level En" The orbit radius is ...
2
votes
0answers
87 views

What are the assumptions behind “term symbols”?

In multi-electron atoms, the electronic state of the optically active "subshell" is often expressed in "term symbols" notation. I.e. $^{2S+1}L_J$. This presumes that the system of electrons has ...
0
votes
2answers
83 views

What happens to the atoms and their constituents when we break something ?

My query is: how does an atom stable itself. When we break something, what actually happens in the chemical bonding of its atoms, does it rupture or remain intact?
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Can there exist a Wave which changes the quantum states of particles?

i'm a high school student and i was reading about electromagnetic waves and how they transport energy and that the electric and magnetic fields sustain each other. I have also read about longitudinal ...
2
votes
2answers
132 views

What is the reason for the electrons in a given subshell to orient in certain preferred regions?

My text book says: "Magnetic quantum number describes the behavior of electron in a magnetic field. We know that the movement of electrical charge is always associated with magnetic field. Since ...
2
votes
1answer
285 views

Is it that electron of an atom can be found anywhere in the space?

Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found. The diagrams cannot, ...
4
votes
3answers
657 views

Why is a proton assumed to be always at the center while applying the Schrödinger equation?

Why is a proton assumed to be always at the center while applying the Schrödinger equation? Isn't it a quantum particle?
0
votes
1answer
130 views

Electron Decay, Why are there P and higher orbitals?

Related: Decay from excited state to ground state My confusion arose initially from the definition of binding energy being the lowest energy state (n=1) in the hydrogen atom. This, I assume, is ...
0
votes
5answers
577 views

Do electrons collapse into nucleus, if electrons in the atom are constantly excited?

From the Bohr's atomic model, it is clear that electron can have only certain definite energy levels. When the electron is present as close to the nucleus as possible, the atom has the minimum ...
1
vote
4answers
262 views

Why is the Bohr's idea of defined circular orbits overruled?

If we consider a thought experiment for determining position of an electron by using photons of light. According to principles of optics, if we use light of wavelength $\lambda$, then the position of ...
-4
votes
5answers
968 views

Why won't protons revolve around the nucleus containing electrons and neutrons?

In case of solar system,we can explain "Why Sun would not revolve around any other planet?",by giving the reason that Sun is heavier than any other planets. Heavier the body,greater will be the ...
0
votes
2answers
165 views

Which is more characteristic of an element absorption or emission spectrum?

Absorption and emission spectrum are used to reveal the identity of an element and even to find new elements. But, which of them is more characteristic? The mission spectrum would have more lines ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference between spin-orbit coupling and LS coupling (Russell-Saunders)

I'm having some trouble understand what the difference is between these two. It seems as though there are kind of the same, but that spin-orbit coupling reduces to LS coupling under certain ...
7
votes
5answers
311 views

Do orbitals overlap?

Yes, as the title states: Do orbitals overlap ? I mean, if I take a look at this figure... I see the distribution in different orbitals. So if for example I take the S orbitals, they are all just ...
-4
votes
2answers
376 views

What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?

Look at this here. With respect to the sciences, the atom is obviously not the smallest piece of mass. Apparently, if people have already broken down the atom in to particles smaller than so, why ...
0
votes
2answers
183 views

LS Coupling - weird image in the book

In the book by Arthur Beiser, Concepts of modern physics, in the chapter LS coupling there is this image: QUESTION: How do we get total orbital angular momentum $L=3$ (image (a)) out of quantum ...
1
vote
1answer
350 views

Total angular momentum - single electron

I have been dealing with total angular momentum of the single electron which is outside the closed shells in which sum of the angular momentums is zero. My book says that total atomic angular ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Difference between photo electron spectrum and photoelectron angular distribution

I am trying to learn the Photoelectron velocity map imaging. While I was going through the article "Chem. Soc. Rev., 2009,38,2169-2177", it is said that the "photoelectron spectrum reflects the energy ...
0
votes
1answer
148 views

On the atomic level, how is incandescent light structured?

I want to know from the smallest possible originating structures how the light I see generated from heat is made by atoms themselves.
3
votes
1answer
240 views

Why electron clouds in atoms don't radiate? [duplicate]

I was reading that Bohr assumed electrons in orbit simply did not radiate, and my professor told me that the actual case is that electrons are clouds of probability. Even so, aren't they still moving ...
1
vote
2answers
143 views

classical understanding of an atom [duplicate]

A problem in Bohr's day was understanding why an orbiting electron does not continuously radiate an EM field. An orbiting electron is a moving charge and according to Maxwell, this should generate an ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

How does adding electrons break the angular momentum degeneracy?

In the hydrogen atom, the energy does not depend on l. This degeneracy is sometimes called "accidental" (because it does not correspond to some symmetry?). However, there is l dependence in the energy ...
0
votes
1answer
197 views

How to determine the region that would contain a quantum particle

(a) A hydrogen atom is in its ground state. If space is divided into identical infinitesimal cubes, in which cube is the electron most likely to be found? If instead space is divided into 31 ...
1
vote
0answers
100 views

Total angular momentum in multielectron atoms

I have some confusion about orbitals in multielectron atoms. Let's say we consider an atom (Lithium, for example, $1s^2\, 2p^1$) and that the state of the last electron is [n=2, l=1, ml=0, s=1/2, ...
4
votes
1answer
269 views

How can we describe the electrons of multi-electron atoms (i.e. not Hydrogen) when equations/analytic solutions only exist for Hydrogen?

I've been digging into emission spectra of different elements and found that such things as the Rydberg equation, Bohr's model, and quantum mechanics can only fully describe the single electron in the ...
14
votes
8answers
2k views

Where did Schrödinger solve the radiating problem of Bohr's model?

One of the problems with Bohr's theory to describe the hydrogen atom, was that the electron orbiting around the nucleus has an acceleration. Therefore it radiates and loses energy, until it would ...
2
votes
1answer
436 views

Dark and bright areas around atoms in a scanning tunnelling microscope image

Recently IBM created world’s smallest ever animation on an atomic scale video. Researchers made the animation using a scanning tunnelling microscope to move thousands of carbon monoxide molecules to ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

How large must the Quantum teleportation fidelity have to be in order for it to be useful?

This question relates and stems from my original question. Please read this one and the comments before answering this question. Quantum Teleportation Fidelity I know that for discrete variables ...
1
vote
0answers
142 views

why is the transition $3p^53d^2 \to 3p^63d^1$ (hydrogen atom) forbidden?

What I was thinking is that in 3d subshell (l=2) we have two electrons with $$m_l=-2$$ (spin up and down) and if we move to 3p we will fill the last vacant position - that is $$m_l=1$$ with spin down ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

How can the nucleus of an atom be in an excited state?

An example of the nucleus of an atom being in an excited state is the Hoyle State, which was a theory devised by the Astronomer Fred Hoyle to help describe the vast quantities of carbon-12 present in ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Where do electrons get the energy to remain in orbit? [duplicate]

As we know electrons continuously revolve around the nuclus without falling in it at a high velocity beating it's force of attraction. My question is where do electrons get energy to revolve around ...
2
votes
1answer
162 views

How is energy transferred between atoms in a collision?

Consider two bare protons. One (A) is stationary (relative to some arbitrary massless observer); the other (B) is approaching A at 1 m/s. When they collide, I assume that they bounce. What is the ...
4
votes
3answers
255 views

Do electrons in multi-electron atoms really have definite angular momenta?

Since the mutual repulsion term between electrons orbiting the same nucleus does not commute with either electron's angular momentum operator (but only with their sum), I'd assume that the electrons ...
6
votes
2answers
385 views

Do the energy levels of electron orbitals change relativistically?

When an electron emits a photon from changing energy levels, the frequency of the photon depends on the difference between the energy levels. But if someone is moving with respect to the atom, the ...
0
votes
1answer
440 views

Elastic collisions in Franck-Hertz experiment

Looking at a Franck-Hertz experimental setup, and given a potential difference such as $4.0\ V$ which is too small to excite out the first electron orbital, the electrons moving through the tube will ...
2
votes
1answer
405 views

What is the spatial mode of light or the spatial mode of a massive particle?

I'm extremely confused by what physicists mean by the spatial mode of light. I am also equally if not more confused by what the spatial mode of a massive particle is. Can anyone help me out by ...
2
votes
2answers
253 views

What's the difference between two Hydrogen atoms?

If we are given two Hydrogen atoms, would the only difference between them would be their quantum state (Energy level or eigen value, and the corresponding Orbital or eigen state) and their location ...
4
votes
2answers
465 views

Is it possible to recover the old Bohr-Sommerfeld model from the QM description of the atom by turning off some parameters?

Is it possible to recover the old Bohr-Sommerfeld model from the QM description of the atom by turning off some parameters? Can we use Ehrenfest's theorem (or some other scheme) to reduce the QM ...
0
votes
1answer
130 views

What is changed when proton has finite radius?

How the field and interactions are changed when we assume that proton has finite radius in atom for example? What gives the finite size effect? Is it the higher moments of multipole expansion?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Energy shift between hydrogen and deuterium

Stated: The atomic spectra of hydrogen and deuterium are similar however shifted in energies. So im trying to explain why it is that the emission lines are shifted and how they are shifted. Since ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Bohr's model of an atom doesn't seem to have overcome the drawback of Rutherford's model

We, as high school students have been taught that-because Bohr's model of an atom assigns specific orbits for electrons-that it is better than Rutherford's model. But what Rutherford failed to explain ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Bohr Model of the Hydrogen Atom - Energy Levels of the Hydrogen Atom

Why the allowed (stationary) orbits correspond to those for which the orbital angular momentum of the electron is an integer multiple of $\hbar=\frac {h}{2\pi}$? $$L=n\hbar$$ Bohr Quantization rule of ...
4
votes
3answers
167 views

How do we know that internal conversion creates no intermediate photon?

I've read, from several sources, that in internal conversion -- an excited electron transferring its energy to another electron which is then emitted -- no intermediate gamma radiation is produced. ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

How can one describe electron motion around hydrogen atom?

I remember from introductory Quantum Mechanics, that hydrogen atom is one of those systems that we can solve without too much ( embarrassing ) approximations. After a number of postulates, QM ...