Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (3)

0
votes
1answer
14 views

Why a hole in the Dirac sea can be seen as having opposite energy?

In the Dirac's old attempt of relativistic quantum mechanics, a hole in the $E'$ level of the Dirac sea was interpreted as a particle of opposite charge and positive energy. I do get why it can be ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

What methods exist to calculate the density of states in the continuum of a molecule?

Say I have an arbitrary molecule in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and furthermore say that I can approximate the molecule as having only one active electron. What methods exist to calculate the ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

How many wavefunctions are in a minimal basis set for benzene?

I am reading Modern Quantum Chemistry by Szabo and Ostlund and on page 62 he says "A minimal basis set for benzene consists of 72 spin orbitals." I tried to understand this number but failed. ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Quantum physics presentation topic [on hold]

i am doing my advanced quantum mechanics course and the instructor want me to deliver a presentation end of the course.. The topics are: Born-Oppenheimer Approximation → Berry Phase Non-Hermitian ...
5
votes
3answers
222 views

Tensor product notation convention?

For two particle state, the Dirac ket is writren as $$\lvert\textbf{r}_1\rangle \otimes \lvert\textbf{r}_2 \rangle. $$ Then how do we write its bra vector, $$\langle\textbf{r}_1\rvert \otimes ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Does it matter in which order settings will be changed during CHSH-inequality check experiment?

Does it matter in which order detector settings will be changed when checking CHSH inequality? For example, i'm trying to build a simple (and very approximate) computer simulation of experiment. Now ...
2
votes
1answer
26 views

Does the relative angular momentum of the nucleons contribute to the spin of the nuclei?

Imagine we have a nucleus. We do talk about spins of nuclei. Is this spin the total angular momentum of the nucleus, that is, spins and relative angular momentum of all of the nucleons? If so, why? ...
2
votes
0answers
23 views

Spin via Change of Phase

Thinking of spin as arising from a change in the phase of a wave function: The angular momentum is defined by the change of the phase of the wave function under rotations, which may come from the ...
1
vote
2answers
193 views

Has magnetism been experimentally demonstrated at the quantum level?

I've learned that magnetic fields are generated by electric currents, and that electric current is the motion of electrons and stuff like that. Many textbooks also talk about "point charges" and have ...
2
votes
0answers
76 views

What does the Schrodinger Equation really mean?

I understand that the Schrodinger equation is actually a principle that cannot be proven. But can someone give a plausible foundation for it and give it some physical meaning/interpretation. I guess ...
2
votes
0answers
25 views

How does a photon travel through an electron cloud?

We all know that the exact position and exact velocity of an electron in an atom cannot be determined simultaneously, as per the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. We only talk about the probability of ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Quantized modes of EM field in a cubic cavity

I am trying to solve for Electric field modes in a cubic cavity with perfectly reflecting walls. I know that for the modes, I have the standard Helmholtz Equation $$(\nabla^2+k^2)E_i=0$$ And I want ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

compressibility of cold atoms in optical lattices

The compressibility of cold bosons in an optical lattice is defined as $\kappa = \frac{\partial \langle n\rangle}{\partial \mu}$, where $\langle n\rangle$ is the density and $\mu$ is the chemical ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Imaginary Angular Momentum [on hold]

I recently came across a problem online where it asks you to interpret an imaginary angular momentum about an axis. Apparently there's a chance it has to do with superconducting. What is the correct ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Quantum Harmonic Oscillator - Normalizability of Annihilated Ground State

The common line of deductions in the operator analysis of the quantum harmonic oscillator goes something like this: It is derived that the action of the annihilation operator $a$ on an eigenfunction ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Is there any defect in Rutherford's atomic model according to quantum theory?

According to quantum mechanics charged bodies do not emit energy. Then why the atomic model of Rutherford has the defects of collapsing nucleus, continues spectrum.
0
votes
0answers
26 views

quantum hall effect and hamiltonian [on hold]

I need a good book or lecture on quantum hall effect. my supervisor wants me to find the Hamiltonian for the Qunatum hall effect, he want me to find this from this relation if it looks like a 2nd ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

References on experimental realization of quantum one-dimensional infinite-well model

Can someone point me to the examples, or references, of experimental realization of the quantum one-dimensional infinite-well model? [EDIT] The motivation of this question is the curiosity - though ...
3
votes
0answers
46 views

Why does this condition ensure that the residue of the propagator is 1?

The corrected propagator is given by $$\Delta'(q)=\frac{1}{q^2+m^2-\Pi^*(q^2)-i\epsilon}$$ ($\Pi^*$ is the sum of all irreducible one-particle amplitudes) I get that the residue of the original ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Dirac Notation Question Appearing In a Projection

So I have a part of the energy eigenvalue equation that look like this: $$ \delta(\hat{x})|n\rangle $$ Where n is the energy basis of the Hamiltonian I'm considering. To deal with this, I tried ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

When is quantum optics “correct”?

What is the regime under which we may consider quantum optics description of light a good approximation of a more correct theory such as QED? By quantum optics I mean describing the electromagnetic ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Why does the raising and lowering operator not affect total angular momentum?

My notes define: $$ L_{\pm} = L_{x} \pm i L_{y} $$ and states: $$ [L_{z},L_{\pm}] = \pm \hbar L_{\pm} $$ I'm fine with this as it's easy to show the result with some ugly algebra. It then says: ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Stern-Gerlach experiment theory question [on hold]

I have an assignment problem which I've been having some difficulty with. i know the answer but I want to know how to arrive at it correctly, and want to know where I've gone wrong. Determine the ...
4
votes
1answer
65 views

Understanding the Particle Data Group review documents

Would someone mind outlining what each piece of semi-structured data means in these images taken of some PDG documents? As a newcomer it is very difficult to interpret the tables. tl;dr This ...
8
votes
2answers
941 views

How does an electron move around in an orbital? Is it “wave-like” or random?

When an electron is moving around in it's orbital, is it actually moving around like a wave, like this video shows? (By wave-like, I mean, the "electron" in this video is showing it following a ...
1
vote
4answers
138 views

How does the electron jump across “gaps” in its orbital?

I saw on perhaps COSMOS, and have heard mention from other professors, that electrons sort of "teleport" or something, in their orbital and the quantum level. So looking at the orbitals for a lone ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Coupled Quantum Harmonic Oscillator

Given the following Hamiltonian for two identical linear oscillators with spring constant $k$ and interaction potential $\alpha x_1x_2$; I was asked to find the expectation value $\langle ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Why is the full eigen function is product of eigen functions and not addition?

For example suppose there is a two electron system. Why is the full eigen function product of the spatial eigen function and spin wave function for the two electron system?
2
votes
0answers
45 views

Time and particles [on hold]

What it is in basic particles that make them propagate themselves through time or, basically, what brings that property known as Duration in a particle (wave)? I sense that this is somehow is based ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Question about atom subshells

So my teacher told me that EACH shell contains 5 subshells (s, p, d, f, g) but what I don't understand is this The 1st shell has only 1 subshell (and not 5 like he said) and the number of ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Bound states, scattering states and infinite potentials

I am doing my first semester of Quantum Mechanics and we're using Griffith's Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. As he is introducing the Dirac delta function potential he explains bound and scattering ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Eigenfunctions for $1s$ hydrogen Schrodinger equation

I am a computer scientist and started my Phd in material science. The second course os my Phd is material simulation by computer. One the task is show the verification of the eigenfunction $1s$ from ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Is there any physical quantity that does not have uncertainty?

I saw this video and I got a thought: Is there any physical quantity that does not have uncertainty? Basic models are: for lenght for time end energy (so for mass too) and I realized that ...
2
votes
4answers
184 views

How did photons and electrons arise out of the quark-gluon plasma?

I am just beginning to learn about the ideas of the early universe, so this is probably a beginner question. I understand that protons and neutrons (which are baryons, which are hadrons) are made out ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Stimulated emission and coherence

For a significant part of my life I have been taught that, if a photon of the "correct" energy meets an excited atom, the atom will then (with a certain probability) undergo transition to a lower ...
3
votes
1answer
136 views

Directional derivatives in the multivariable Taylor expansion of the translation operator

Let $T_\epsilon=e^{i \mathbf{\epsilon} P/ \hbar}$ an operator. Show that $T_\epsilon\Psi(\mathbf r)=\Psi(\mathbf r + \mathbf \epsilon)$. Where $P=-i\hbar \nabla$. Here's what I've gotten: ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Simplest Hamiltonian for 2d wave equation with periodic boundary conditions

I want to use the 2d wave equation ($\frac{\partial^2u}{\partial t^2}=\frac{\partial^2u}{\partial x^2}+\frac{\partial^2u}{\partial y^2}$) with periodic boundary conditions as a simple toy model of a ...
1
vote
2answers
96 views

A question on quantum computing and de Broglie's pilot wave theory

I don't know much about quantum computing except what I have read about on wiki and popsci. I have been reading about the de Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory and how they describe quantum mechanics in ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

A question on quantum computing? [duplicate]

I dont know much about quantum computing except what i have read about on wiki and popsci. I have been reading about the de broglie-bohm pilot wave theory and how they describe quantum mechanics in ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Why is commutation relations the first step in quantization?

Why is commutation relations the first step in quantization?
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

Can quanta have different energy levels? [on hold]

The energy of a wave is h*f. How i imagine this is each cycle consisting of 1 quanta. I sometimes hear people say the energy of a photon is equal to h*f which makes it sound like each cycle has a ...
2
votes
3answers
93 views

Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2

H2O has a 109.5 degree bond angle, but CO2 has exactly 180 degrees. Is there a qualitative reason for this? It's hard to believe CO2 is exactly 180 degrees unless there were some symmetry, but the ...
10
votes
5answers
742 views

Is there a classical analog to quantum mechanical tunneling?

In comments to a Phys.SE question, it has been written: 'Tunneling' is perfectly real, even in classical physics. [...] For sufficiently large temperatures this can put the system above a hump in ...
2
votes
3answers
151 views

Why can't electrons fall into the nucleus?

I read a book on pop sci book on quantum mechanics and the author said that electrons do not fall into the nucleus due to quantum mechanics- which principles suggest this (I think it was Heisenberg's ...
1
vote
4answers
77 views

Virtual particles/quantum tunneling - conservation of energy?

I'm confused as to how the above phenomena can take place since arent they breaking the law of conservation of energy (even, if temporarily)?
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Definition of transmission and reflection probability

This is a basic question, but it does not seem to be well defined anywhere. Generally, two terms are mixed somewhat randomly: transmission PROBABILITY and transmission coefficient. So to be clear, ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Does a random local unitary destroy entanglement

There is a massive debate raging about whether the wavefunction is an aspect of reality or just a way of handling the data you have about a system. This question is in that vein. A local unitary on ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Quantum mechanics for macroscopic charges?

OK first off tell me if my understanding of the following is correct: In a Hydrogen atom, one would expect that the opposite charges (electron and nucleus) to attract each other, according to ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

What is a virtual state?

In quantum mechanics / Raman spectroscopy, what is a virtual state? What is the difference between a virtual state and a superposition of states? Can you simply think of the virtual state as a ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

How do you actually cool the atoms to create the Bose-Einstein Condensate?

What is the actual way you cool atoms to a low enough temperature that you can observe their quantum behavior at a macroscopic level, like in the Bose-Einstein Condensate? ...