Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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26 views

Would a time difference allow identification of the path in the two-path experiment?

In the two-path (or color-hardness) experiment as described in this link (experiment #3), what would happen if we make one of the paths much longer than the other one. In this way, we would be able to ...
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2answers
61 views

What is the physical meaning of the Lindblad operator?

I read the wikipedia article on the Lindblad operator, but I still don't understand what this operator is supposed to describe. I therefore considered setting up an example in order to get the idea. ...
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0answers
32 views

Is there a difference between two of the same fundamental particle?

Is there a difference between two of the same fundamental particle? For example, is there a difference between two electrons or two protons, or quarks or gluons? If there is a difference then how ...
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1answer
29 views

How to predict bound states in a 1 D triangular well?

Assume we have a (single) particle in a potential well of the following shape: For $x \leq 0$, $V = \infty$ (Region I) For $x \geq L$, $V = 0$ (Region III) For the interval $x > 0$ to $x < ...
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1answer
48 views

How intuitively, does at a fixed moment in time, the “number of times a wavefunction repeats itself in space” is related to “how much it moves”?

(My question seems most likely will be considered a duplicate of OP (and possibly 1, 2, 3), but it turns out to be WAY TOO LONG as a comment in OP, and the system has deleted the corresponding chat ...
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1answer
43 views

How can a two-state ammonia molecule have more than two states?

[...]this molecule, like any other, has an infinite number of states. It can spin around any possible axis; it can be moving in any direction; it can be vibrating inside, and so on, and so on. It ...
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1answer
58 views

Continuous spectrum of hydrogen atom

I wonder if there is a nice treatment of the continuous spectrum of hydrogen atom in the physics literature--showing how the spectrum decomposition looks and how to derive it.
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2answers
61 views

Why is there an energy gap in superconductors?

I'm a little out of my depth here... I'm trying to understand quasiparticle tunnelling in superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions. Many books use the "semiconductor model" to explain this: ...
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1answer
73 views

What's Wrong With This Quantum Analogy?

"Sometimes the idea of the quantum is compared to the units we use for money. A dollar can be divided into smaller units, where the cent is the smallest possible unit." A question I came ...
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0answers
16 views

Doppler-shift of AC-electricity

A tram is powered by overhead wire, the wire has alternating voltage of 1000 V RMS, the frequency of the alternating voltage is 50 Hz. The rails are the other wire. The tram is moving at speed 100 ...
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2answers
100 views

Why is Heisenberg uncertainty principle not valid in waves in string?

We know from high school physics that when the incident wave is traveling from a low density region (high wave speed) region towards a high density (low wave speed) region on a string, the width of ...
3
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2answers
53 views

Non-locality vs. non-realism: Arbitrary choice?

After reading this question, I feel I understand why quantum mechanics is so confusing (and so often confused by the media): It can be either local (if A causes B, then there must be time for a signal ...
3
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1answer
64 views

A particle in a 1D box: what is the meaning of velocity?

In the box $x = 0$ to $x = L$, $V = 0$, and for $x < 0$ and $x > L$, $V = \infty$ (infinite potential well). The eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian are: $$E_n = \frac{n^2 h^2}{8L^2} \, .$$ Since ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Representations of Lorentz group in interacting QFT

In QFT, we obtain a representation of the Lorentz group by defining a set of unitary operators whose action on (spinless) free particle states is given by \begin{equation} U(\Lambda) |k \rangle = ...
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0answers
32 views

The linear algebra of L^2 spaces [on hold]

I'm learning QM by reading pieces of the topics by myself and putting it all together (bigger learning effect). Now I picture everything in terms of linear algebra and analogys of it (literaly all of ...
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2answers
65 views

What actually happens when light meets a surface(QED or QM or Condensed matter physics)?

I want to know what actually happens when light meets a surface like water or wood. Quantum mechanics says that objects are neither "transparent" nor "opaque". Rather a system as a whole can accept ...
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2answers
36 views

If I touch an object, am I touching the atoms on its surface? [duplicate]

If I hit an object with a pen for example, does the pen touch the atoms on the surface of the object? Won't it damage the atoms? If I can't touch it, then where does the sound come from?
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1answer
61 views

Asymmetry of relativistically treated EM force between atoms

There are two neutral atoms set separated at a long distance $R$ and let's consider them phenomenologically through Bohr model. Let's also assume that the nuclei (charged $+q$) of the atoms are fixed ...
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1answer
62 views

Is wave-particle duality not clear from the single-slit experiment?

In experiments it is easy to discern between 2 and more-than-2 fringes on a screen, making the double-slit experiment the default one for wave-particle tests. Let's say we shoot massive particles ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Dirac delta function definition in scattering theory

I'm studying scattering theory from Sakurai's book. In the first pages he gets to the following expression: $$\langle n|U_I(t, t_0)|i\rangle=\delta_{ni}-\frac{i}{\hbar}\langle ...
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0answers
31 views

Gravity theory help? [on hold]

I'm looking for someone to help with math on a theory I have involving gravity on a quantum level. Anyone interested?
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0answers
36 views

Weyl's (and others') Unitary Basis

Galitski's Exploring Quantum Mechanics says (on p.29) 'the number of (linearly) independent unitary ($N$-dimensional) matirces is also $N^2$'. Since the set of unitary matrices does not form a vector ...
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1answer
48 views

How to include Berry Connection in Hamiltonian?

When we calculate Berry connection, $A(R)=i<\psi(x,y)|\frac{d}{dR}|\psi(x,y)>\hat{R}$ corresponding to the Berry phase of any system, the gauge potential is related to the $R$ of the parameter ...
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0answers
17 views

Speed of Electron delta orbital function [on hold]

Is there a function that determines the delta in speed of electrons in subsequent orbitals? If so, is it the same for all elements or does it differ because of relativistic effects? Would an electron ...
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1answer
74 views

Schrodinger's equation with negative sign

In time dependent Schrodinger's equation as given in Schrodinger's lecture (Four Lectures on Wave mechanics, Blackie & Son, 1949, pg22) he arrives at $$\nabla^2\psi-\frac{4 \pi m ...
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16 views

What is the reason behind restriction imposed by no-cloning theroem on (k,n) quantum threshold scheme (QTS)?

A $(k,n)$ quantum threshold scheme (QTS) is a method to split up an unknown secret quantum state $\lvert S\rangle$ into $n$ pieces (shares) with the restriction that $k > n / 2$ (for if this ...
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3answers
60 views

Confusion about Fock subspace

I'm currently reading Folland's book on quantum field theory and came along some definitions. On p.90 of his book, Folland defines the symmetric Fock space as ...
1
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3answers
108 views

Why does Hamiltonian follow the property $H^*_{ij} = H_{ji} $?

I was reading Feynman's Lectures III's Hamiltonian Matrix. There I found this property of Hamiltonian Matrix: The Hamiltonian has one property that can be deduced right away, namely, that ...
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0answers
31 views

Perturbation theory in second quantization

I am dealing with electron/phonon interaction in QM. In particular, given the Hamiltonian of a solid, $$H=H_{el}+H_{ion}+H_{el-ion}$$ we have that the el-phonon Hamiltonian is treatened ...
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0answers
45 views

Simplifying a formula with Wigner d-functions

I'm following a textbook called A Group-Theoretical Approach to Quantum Optics by Andrei Klimov and Sergei Chumakov. In chapter 10, the authors calculate the Wigner function for the atomic coherent ...
0
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2answers
277 views

What do “ℜe” and “A*” mean?

What do "$\mathfrak{Re}$" and "A*" mean in the following equation (taken from James Binney and David Skinner's QM lecture notes, equation 1.12), \begin{align} p(S\text{ or ...
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63 views

Why does light travels in all directions? [on hold]

My understanding of time, gravity and speed of light: Earth revolves around the Sun. Sun revolves around Milky Way centre. Milky Way also keeps moving. All these movements are caused by gravity. ...
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1answer
20 views

Number of classical oscillation modes of a Lattice and number of quantum phonons

In solving the Classical model for lattice dynamics [Rossler pag 38] we find that the lattice admits $$d\cdot N\cdot r = \#modes$$ where $d=$dimension of the problem $N=$ number of atoms $r=$ ...
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1answer
73 views
+50

What determines a particles probability of creation?

I know when we're discussing events at a quantum level, we deal in probability and not absolutes. What I'm looking to understand, is when articles I've read on particle physics state a particle has a ...
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0answers
61 views

How do I calculate momentum for a particle in a box, using the momentum quantum operator? [on hold]

For a particle in a one dimensional box with $U(x) = 0$ between $x = 0$ and $x = L$ (infinite Potential well) the momentum for $n = 1,2,3,...$ is given by: $$p_n = \frac{nh}{2 L}$$ The wave ...
1
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1answer
34 views

The GHZ-State in conflict with local realism

Consider three, with respect to their polarisation, entangled particles in the following state: $|\psi\rangle = \frac{1}{\sqrt2}(|H\rangle_1|H\rangle_2|H\rangle_3 + ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Fixing time in Feynman phase space path integral

The phase space version of Feynman's path integral expression for the free particle propagator involves a (formal) sum over paths in phase space with fixed $q$ endpoints and (as far as I'm aware) ...
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6answers
245 views

Why does time evolution operator have the form $U(t) = e^{-itH}$?

Let's denote by $|\psi(t)\rangle$ some wavefunction at time $t$. Then let's define the time evolution operator $U(t_1,t_2)$ through $$ U(t_2,t_1) |\psi(t_1)\rangle = |\psi(t_2)\rangle \tag{1}$$ and ...
2
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1answer
45 views

Why do the two amplitudes need to match together through the region between the boxes?

This is an excerpt from Feynman's lectures 3; Suppose we think of the situation in Fig. 7–3, which has two boxes held at the constant potentials $ϕ_1$ and $ϕ_2$ and a region in between where ...
2
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1answer
43 views

Reflection of an Electron

When a mechanical wave goes from one material to an other, some fraction of it returns back. Same thing with light (massless), but what happens with an electron? When the "wave function" changes ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Do the eigenstates of the Pauli operators correspond to the six directions of the 3D world?

I understand that the six eigenstates of the three Pauli operators $X, Y, Z$ correspond to the six poles of the Bloch sphere. By fixing an orthonormal basis of our physical word, does "measuring Pauli ...
2
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0answers
31 views

Conservation of momentum in Heisenberg's microscope

In working through Heisenberg's microscope, conservation of momentum for the photon and electron tells us that \begin{align} \frac{h}{\lambda}=\frac{h}{\lambda'}\sin\theta+p_x\,, \end{align} where ...
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votes
2answers
80 views

Quantum Entanglement - How To Interpret [duplicate]

I have thought about quantum entanglement for some time, and I still don't quite understand the reasoning behind the conclusion that entangled particles somehow can communicate their state to each ...
3
votes
1answer
26 views

One Pion Exchange Potential properties for a two-nucleon system

I'm going through my Nuclear Physics book, and has come across a section called "Properties of OPEP for the two-nucleon system". It start out by considering the n-p system in a singlet spin state ...
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0answers
33 views

Liouville's theorem in quantum mechanics

Is there any theorem in quantum mechanics which relates conservation of any physical quantity (say density) just like Liouville's theorem does in classical mechanics?
2
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1answer
22 views

variation of electrostatic potential on moving radially outwards from the nucleus of an atom

I was wondering how would the electrostatic potential change on moving radially outwards from the nucleus in an atom, considering the effect of the electron clouds around it.
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0answers
47 views

Commutation relation between linear momentum and vector Potential [closed]

Does the linear momentum and vector potential commute? How can we show their commutation relation ? I am actually trying to find the commutation relation between both linear momentum of an electron ...
2
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1answer
44 views

Diagonal part of the configuration space of two indistinguishable quantum particles

Why is the configuration space of two indistinguishable particles given by $\frac{M^n-\Delta}{S_n}$? My question is about the $\Delta$. (Notation: $M$ is the configuration space of 1 particle. $M^n$ ...
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1answer
25 views

Bragg's interference

This may be a little of a stupid question. But I was looking at a diagram describing Bragg's Law of Diffraction. and I was like...how can an interference happen if wave beam C and wave beam C' are ...
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0answers
28 views

What is the explicit decay width formula for a four body decay?

I'm trying to calculate the decay width for a theory with one particle having a decay mode into 4 particles. Does anyone know the explicit formula for this (not the generalized decay formula).