Quantum information is the study of the informational content of quantum states. The most common object of study is the "qubit", the information in a two-state quantum system such as spin-1/2 or photon polarization.

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Probabilistic quantum cloning

I have a question with regard to probabilistic quantum cloning - see for example http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v80/i22/p4999_1. It does seems like I can use the proof for no-cloning theorem to ...
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Are there any applications of quantum information theory to physics?

Are there any applications of quantum information theory to physics?
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The complementary variable to the qubit and spin-1/2

The qubit is a big topic of quantum information theory. A qubit is a single quantum bit. Physical examples of qubits include the spin-1/2 of an electron, for example, see page 39 of Preskill: ...
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How many stabilised qubits have been achieved in Quantum Computing?

The latest I read is 3 but that was in Oct. With Lene Hau of Harvard's "frozen light" and with quantum donuts, newer strategies for stabilization are appearing, but the problem of keeping the qubit in ...
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How many bytes can the observable universe store?

Is the number of states in the Universe countable? What framework could be used to answer the question in the title?
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Informational capacity of qubits and photons

How much information is contained in one qubit? A qubit is defined in Wikipedia as $a\left|0\right> +b\left|1\right>$, where a and b are complex numbers subject to $a^2 + b^2 = 1$. One complex ...
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Do Category Theory and/or Quantum Logic add value in physics?

I know they have their adherents, but do more or less esoteric branches of mathematics such as Category Theory and/or Quantum Logic provide powerful tools for new theory development or are they just ...
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What are the benefits of quantum information “teleportation”?

I read occasionally popular science articles and from time to time encounter issues about quantum information teleportation. (this one for example http://www.physorg.com/news193551675.html) So far I ...
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Using delayed choice interference experiments as a computing device

I had an idea how to design a "quantum computer": How about designing interference-experiments where the design of the experiments itself represents algorithmical or mathematical problems that are ...
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Why is quantum entanglement considered to be an active link between particles?

From everything I've read about quantum mechanics and quantum entanglement phenomena, it's not obvious to me why quantum entanglement is considered to be an active link. That is, it's stated every ...
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Is there such a thing as “Action at a distance”?

What ever happened to "action at a distance" in entangled quantum states, i.e. the Einstein-Rosen-Podolsky (EPR) paradox? I thought they argued that in principle one could communicate faster than ...
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Why are von Neumann Algebras important in quantum physics?

At the moment I am studying operator algebras from a mathematical point of view. Up to now I have read and heard of many remarks and side notes that von Neumann algebras ($W^*$ algebras) are important ...
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Can I parameterize the state of a quantum system given reduced density matrices describing its subparts?

As the simplest example, consider a set of two qubits where the reduced density matrix of each qubit is known. If the two qubits are not entangled, the overall state would be given by the tensor ...
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Which qubit states are accessible with linear optics operations?

Given a quantum state of $n$ qubits, and being restricted to linear optics (that is, the output annihilation operators are linear combinations of the input annihilation operators): Which states are ...
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Is there a simple way to express the 2ⁿ+1 mutually unbiased bases for n qubits?

The title says it. An explanation for only 2 qubits would already be interesting, since I already have difficulties to find the 5 MUBs in this simple case.
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Unambiguous distinguishing of quantum states by local measurement

Let's have two orthogonal n-particle quantum states: $|\psi \rangle$ and $|\phi \rangle$. In theory it is always possible to make an unambiguous measurement. However, things get complicated when one ...