Any of the various explanations of gravity as a quantum theory, including string theory and loop quantum gravity.

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Does the existence of dualities imply a more fundamental structure?

I was wondering if the existence of some kind of duality in physics always implies the existence of some underlying more fundamental structure/concept? Let me give a few example from history: ...
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728 views

What do “tachionic” neutrinos mean for QG?

Reading about the spectacular Opera claim, I`m (again ;-P) wondering if a confirmation of superliminous neutrinos could help settle some still open quantum gravity issues ...? In this post, Lumo ...
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101 views

Do quantum wave functions curve spacetime before they are measured

Do wave functions cause spacetime curvature before they are measured, or would curvature only happen upon measurement? I guess the question becomes, do quantum wavefunctions carry energy while they ...
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99 views

Derivation of metric of space time with a point source in 2+1 dimension using ADM formalism

In "Quantum Gravity in 2+1 dimension" by S Carlip, Sec 3.1 (where the metric of a spacetime with a point source is derived, using the ADM formalism), equation 3.8 states that (this is the momentum ...
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291 views

Fundamental Constants in a theory of everything (TOE)

Do physicists ever expect to be able to derive the fundamental constants of nature from theory? For example, if string theory or some other theory unites the four forces, would the theory be ...
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144 views

Where and how is the entropy of a black hole stored?

Where and how is the entropy of a black hole stored? Is it around the horizon? Most of the entanglement entropy across the event horizon lies within Planck distances of it and are short lived. Is ...
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1answer
387 views

What does AdS/CFT have to say about quantum gravity in our world?

The Ads side of the AdS/CFT correspondence is a model of quantum gravity in 5 dimensional antidesitter space. What can it say about quantum gravity in our 4-spacetime dimensions? Or is it just a toy ...
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181 views

AdS to dS uplifting and its opposite

So as I understand it, localized structures in AdS can wick rotated to dS, the boundary has to be complixified as can be seen here. Also, uplifting is another technique that can be used to move from ...
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219 views

Please justify invoking logical positivism to causal patches and black hole interiors in quantum gravity! [closed]

Logical positivism is often invoked to explain why external observers can't talk about black hole interiors, or why we can't talk about what happens outside our causal patch in inflationary models. ...
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134 views

Theories that predict the number of space-time dimensions

My impression in that most theories assume three spatial dimensions and one temporal dimension, though could in principle be formulated in others numbers of dimensions without inconsistencies. I know, ...
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213 views

Formation of a black hole and Hawking radiation

From the perspective of an outside observer it takes infinitely long for the black hole to form. But if the black hole is no extremal black hole, it emits Hawking radiation. So the outside observer ...
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294 views

Why isn't Hawking radiation frozen on the boundary, like in-falling matter?

From the perspective of a far-away observer, matter falling into a black hole never crosses the boundary. Why doesn't a basic symmetry argument prove that Hawking radiation is therefore also frozen on ...
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430 views

What is the mechanism for fast scrambling of information by black holes?

Sekino and Susskind have argued that black holes scramble information faster than any quantum field theory in this paper. What is the mechanism for such scrambling?
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225 views

Motivation for “discretized quantum state spaces”

I know that the title of the question is rather vague, so let me clarify what I mean. For a quantum system, the set of states has infinitely (even continuously) many extreme points, i.e. there are ...
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1answer
226 views

How is black hole complementarity derived from path integrals or string theory?

How is the black hole complementarity version of the holographic principle derived from path integrals and/or string theory? That has never been obvious to me. Can someone show me how to do it step by ...
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1k views

Mathematical justification of Hartle-Hawking “no boundary” proposal

In Hartle-Hawking "no boundary" proposal it is proposed that Riemannian spacetimes rather than Lorentzian dominated the path integral near the big bang. Moments after the big bang however spacetimes ...
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239 views

Can T-duality resolve spacelike singularities?

Schwarzschild singularities are described by the Kantowski-Sachs metric with a contracting S2. Of course, T-duality doesn't apply to S2. But what about a Kasner-type singularity with two contracting ...
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1k views

How could spacetime become discretised at the Planck scale?

I didn't have much luck getting a response to this question before so I have tried to reword and expand it a little: In early 2010 I attended this inaugural lecture by string theorist- Prof. ...
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348 views

What are the current (popular(ish)) approaches to modelling the quantum nature of spacetime at the Planck scale?

My guess at a list of them would be: spin foams, casual sets, non-commutative geometry, Machian theories, twistor theory or strings and membranes existing in some higher-dimensional geometry... ...
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217 views

Renormalization in Classical Field Theory

1) The statement that general relativity (GR) is not renormalizable - is it a statement only about the quantization of GR or is it non-renormalizable also as a classical field theory? 2) More ...
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212 views

What are the good introductory resources for M-theory towards AdS/CFT? [duplicate]

I see a list here with a section titled M-theory - http://www.superstringtheory.com/links/reviews.html In there these two look promising, http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/9607201 and ...
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597 views

Is spacetime an illusion?

In consistent histories, for gauge theories, can the projection operators used in the chains be not gauge invariant? In quantum gravity, for a projection operator to be gauge invariant means it has ...
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918 views

What is the motivation for assuming “Page” scrambling for Hawking radiation?

What is the motivation for assuming "Page" scrambling for Hawking radiation? Obviously, at the semiclassical level, we want the outgoing Hawking radiation to look thermal and mixed. However, surely ...
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233 views

Is the only diffeomorphism invariant anthropic principle the final anthropic principle?

Quantum gravity is a gauge theory with the gauge symmetry spacetime diffeomorphisms. Presumably the quantum state of our universe is invariant under spacetime diffeomorphisms, including timelike ...
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155 views

Using open system dynamics to define a quantum state

Background The density matrix of a closed quantum system with Hilbert space $\mathscr H$ evolves according to the von Neumann equation \begin{align*} i\hbar\dot\rho=[H,\rho]. \end{align*} Given a ...
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371 views

Squashed 3-sphere?

What is a squashed 3-sphere? In context of quantum gravity. I stumbled upon a term 'squashed 7 sphere' but that's concerning supersymmetry. Is it just normal 3-sphere metric, that is just 'squashed' ...
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Timelike Loop Spaces as Projective Null Twistor Spaces

Let $\mathcal{M}$ be a spacetime, and let $\Omega\mathcal{M}$ denote the loop space of the spacetime. My idea is that the set of all closed timelike curves of $\mathcal{M}$ forms the projective null ...
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378 views

Can universal continuity be experimentally falsified?

It is an unresolved question whether the universe is discrete or continuous in its intricate quantum level structure. See for example: Is the universe finite and discrete? How could spacetime become ...
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103 views

Spaans, “On Quantum Contributions to Black Hole Growth”

This paper was posted to arxiv a couple of weeks ago: http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.1067 From the abstract: The effects of Wheeler's quantum foam on black hole growth are explored from an ...
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93 views

A doubt regarding Black Hole Complementarity

A friend was explaining Black Hole Complementarity to me, and at one point he said that to get a (horrendously) mixed quantum state, i.e. a thermal density matrix without a heat bath, one takes a ...
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2k views

Is there any relation between Planck constant and Gravitational constant?

Why is the Gravitational constant about $10^{23}$ times of the Planck constant in SI-units? Is there any relation between them? I mean Planck constant is about $6.6\times 10^{-34}$ $Js$ and ...
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3answers
931 views

Is it possible that QM is just GR?

The more I learn about General Relativity, the more it seems like it isn't fully understood. It seems that before it's full consequences were exhaustively understood, not 10 years after its discovery, ...
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629 views

Does the Opera result hint to a discrete spacetime?

Could the Opera result be interpreted as some kind of hint to a discrete spacetime that is only seen for high enough energy neutrinos? I think I've read (some time ago) something like this in a ...
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403 views

Can an object be infinitely small?

I read somewhere that the earth has to be smaller than 1 cm to become a black hole, according to Schwarzschild. Since big bang came from a singularity, I am wondering, is there any minimum volume for ...
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Are all points in the universe connected?

Is it true that every point in the universe is connected or could be so theoretically? If so how is this mediated? Is it through the quantum nature of the fabric of space or is it through the ...
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Higgs-Boson/Graviton [duplicate]

The Higgs boson gives particles mass. And the graviton is the theoretical force-carrier of gravity. Gravity depends on mass. So if the Higgs Boson gives things mass, it therefore gives them gravity. ...
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4answers
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Why is gravity weak at the quantum level?

Why is gravity stronger than other forces at the macroscopic level, yet weaker than other forces at the quantum level? Is there an explanation?
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93 views

Can light escape a black hole? [duplicate]

I heard that a black hole is not black because it's escape velocity is greater than or equals to the speed of light. But instead it is black because the light that gets emitted from a black hole gets ...
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429 views

Do gravitational waves exist at the quantum level?

Do gravitational waves exist at quantum level produced by electrons or by atoms or by molecules? If yes, which particle produces them and how are they produced? Spacetime exists at a quantum level ...
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392 views

Set theory, category theory, realism and the recent “reality of the wavefunction” papers

I will add a better phrased question here. Do we need to consider quantum foundations to form a quantum theory of gravity? The kind of foundational question I am thinking of is expressed in the ...
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705 views

What are the implications for quantum gravity if the LHC sees no higgs?

Following the news in serious "non-hype" physics blogs I`ve learnd that as things are now one needs a lot of patience and more data to learn what happens in the higgs sector. There are already a ...
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623 views

Introductions to discrete space-time

It's comparatively easy (cum grano salis) to grasp the following concepts: Euclidean space-time (continous space and continuous time) classical mechanics (discretely distributed matter in continous ...
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378 views

Possibly naive question about quantized space-time

I beg your pardon in advance if this question is naive. In Quantum Mechanics, discrete values of measurements occur only in relation to bound states. This is because of the general solution for the ...
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414 views

The cap on massive particles's speed is below the speed of light due to Planck length?

This answer http://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/a/8525/1991 claims that no particle can accelerate further after its de Broglie wavelength becomes Planck length. Given that speed at this point is ...
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173 views

What predictions can a quantum gravity theory make?

Some of the major challenges that heralded the need for quantum mechanics we're explaining the photo-electric effect, the double-slit experiment, and electrons behavior in semi conductors. What are ...
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How do gravitons and curved space time work together? [duplicate]

I've heard two different descriptions of gravity, and I'm wondering how they work together. The first is Gravitons: "The three other known forces of nature are mediated by elementary particles: ...
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Is BRST ghost number conserved in quantum gravity?

Quantum gravity needs Faddeev-Popov ghosts. Feynman showed that. Take a black hole. Hawking pair production of ghost-antighost pair. One ghost falls into the hole and hits the singularity. The ghost ...
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345 views

Gravitational and gauge-gravitational anomalies in N=1 D=4 supergravity coupled to a SUSY gauge theory with chiral matter

When people talk about the first superstring revolution they often mention the miraculous cancellation of anomalies via the Green Schwarz mechanism. My question is whether such a string-theoretic ...
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163 views

What is the problem with quantizing GR in the Effective Field Theory approach?

In the modern view due to Wilson, the cut-off $\Lambda$ is an intrinsic property of a theory and renormalization just means that the theory is invariant under scale transformations below $\Lambda$. ...
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Does the existence (now proved) of gravitational waves imply the existence of Gravitons?

I studied the theoretical part about the Gravitational waves in General Relativity (linearization of gravity and small perturbations of the metric and so on). But I was wondering about: since ...