Any of the various explanations of gravity as a quantum theory, including string theory and loop quantum gravity.

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Introductions to discrete space-time

It's comparatively easy (cum grano salis) to grasp the following concepts: Euclidean space-time (continous space and continuous time) classical mechanics (discretely distributed matter in continous ...
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365 views

Possibly naive question about quantized space-time

I beg your pardon in advance if this question is naive. In Quantum Mechanics, discrete values of measurements occur only in relation to bound states. This is because of the general solution for the ...
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121 views

What predictions can a quantum gravity theory make?

Some of the major challenges that heralded the need for quantum mechanics we're explaining the photo-electric effect, the double-slit experiment, and electrons behavior in semi conductors. What are ...
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621 views

How do gravitons and curved space time work together? [duplicate]

I've heard two different descriptions of gravity, and I'm wondering how they work together. The first is Gravitons: "The three other known forces of nature are mediated by elementary particles: ...
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595 views

Dirac Equation in General Relativity

Dirac equation for the massless fermions in curved spase time is $γ^ae^μ_aD_μΨ=0$, where $e^μ_a$ are the tetrads. I have to show that Dirac spinors obey the following equation: ...
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169 views

Is BRST ghost number conserved in quantum gravity?

Quantum gravity needs Faddeev-Popov ghosts. Feynman showed that. Take a black hole. Hawking pair production of ghost-antighost pair. One ghost falls into the hole and hits the singularity. The ghost ...
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234 views

Could strings be geons?

Is it possible that string theory strings are geons? This may be an overly speculative or naive question, but is there an obvious reason why not? Both strings and geons seem to have roughly the same ...
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2answers
314 views

Gravitational and gauge-gravitational anomalies in N=1 D=4 supergravity coupled to a SUSY gauge theory with chiral matter

When people talk about the first superstring revolution they often mention the miraculous cancellation of anomalies via the Green Schwarz mechanism. My question is whether such a string-theoretic ...
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801 views

What is known on violations of unitarity or locality?

Recently the amplituhedron become a hot topic. I realized that two of the central pillars that QFT is based on, unitarity and locality, are no longer playing an important part (due to gravitational ...
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267 views

Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today?

Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today? Planck's constant : $$h= 6.626068 × 10^{-34}\, m^2 kg / s,$$ $$E=n.h.\nu,$$ $$\epsilon=h.\nu$$
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297 views

Gravity and Planck scale

What is the connection between Planck's constant and gravity? Why is the Planck scale the natural scale for quantum gravity? I would have though the scale would be related to G, not h.
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296 views

Why must the excitation of closed strings in String Theory be spin-2?

In String Theory it is predicted that as a result of the closed strings we have spin-2 gravitons. 1) How do we know there must be an excitation of spin-2 particles? 2) Why does a spin-2 particle ...
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724 views

Is string theory a quantum theory of gravity?

I have read that string theory predicts (or requires ?) the existence of gravitons. So, would that make it a quantum theory of gravity ? If so, I have also read that quantum gravity would allow us to ...
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96 views

How can Planck units be consistent with conflicting dimensions of mass?

I suspect I'm missing something obvious, but I'm coming up blank. I've gotten pretty comfortable with so-called natural units over the years: in doing quantum mechanics/QFT, it's common to set $c = ...
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189 views

Phys.org Spectral geometry to unite relativity and quantum mechanics, restate in laymens terms?

Lingua Franca links relativity and quantum theories with spectral geometry Could someone give me a short synopsis of this article in laymens terms? What implications does this have in the physics ...
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281 views

Question on inflation as a phase transition

I have just finished watching the following video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beQ9fZ0jVdE where Laughlin, Gross and some students discuss e.g. about inflation. The following question is risen: Is ...
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126 views

Why are some extra dimension theories known as strongly coupled and others as weakly coupled?

I was looking at pdf file of the presentation of a conference talk. The speaker discusses two types of "mechanisms" for stabilizing the weak scale and calls them "weakly coupled" and "strongly ...
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167 views

Hilbert of quantum gravity: bulk $\otimes$ horizon

I was reading a paper dealing with the Hilbert of quantum gravity (or more precisely what should it look like considering what we know from QM and GR) ref: http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2675 and the ...
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171 views

Canonical quantum gravity

I am looking for an introduction (textbook or paper, or if someone wouldn't mind writing a memo on it) to canonical quantum gravity, specifically the concept of minisuperspaces. I have been reading ...
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396 views

Why are there Gravitons among the modes of oscillation in String Theory?

Why are gravitons present among the modes of oscillation of the 'strings' in String Theory?
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429 views

Can PEPS explain the holographic principle in quantum gravity?

Condensed matter physicists have shown using quantum information that in many condensed matter systems, entanglement entropy only scales as the area of the boundary, and not the volume. This is the ...
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1answer
116 views

Decoherence without time?

Decoherence is a phenomenon that provides a part of the explanation of why quantum systems and classical systems behave differently. What I understood from decoherence so far is that it requires ...
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1answer
120 views

Is there an absolute minimum scale to the universe? If so, why?

Based on my rather circumscribed understanding of modern physics, one of the key insights of quantum mechanics over previous scientific theories is the prediction that there exists an absolute limit ...
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288 views

what does holographic principle from string theory say about the possibilities of wormhole travel?

Is travel through stable macroscopic wormholes between remote points of spacetime going to be possible in a definitive theory of gravity, be it string theory or something beyond it? Physicists level ...
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358 views

Hawking radiation and black hole entropy

Is black hole entropy, computed by means of quantum field theory on curved spacetime, the entropy of matter degrees of freedom i.e. non-gravitational dofs? What is one actually counting?
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178 views

Please justify invoking logical positivism to causal patches and black hole interiors in quantum gravity!

Logical positivism is often invoked to explain why external observers can't talk about black hole interiors, or why we can't talk about what happens outside our causal patch in inflationary models. ...
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70 views

Why is the value of the action integral in general relativity the same on all regions that are homologous?

In their famous paper Action integrals and partition functions in quantum gravity, Gibbons and Hawking argue that in order to avoid the singularity of a Schwarzschild black hole you can complexify ...
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177 views

What happens when you apply the path integral to the Einstein-Hilbert action?

The Einstein Field Equations emerge when applying the principle of least action to the Einstein-Hilbert action, and from what I understand the path integral formulation generalizes the principle of ...
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172 views

Divergence of One and Two Graviton Exchanges

At the bottom of pg. 3, Kiritsis states the following To appreciate the difficulties with the quantization of Einstein gravity, we look at a single-graviton exchange between two particles (Fig. ...
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161 views

Why doesn't the firewall argument also apply to far away ingoing modes?

Gidom Mera's answer at http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/45511 is illuminating, but on closer analysis, it brings up further puzzles. Backscattering works in both directions. Let's see what we get ...
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970 views

Why does the universe exhibit three large-scale spatial dimensions? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is 3+1 spacetime as privileged as is claimed? Regardless of your favorite theory of how many dimensions the universe has in total, the universe seems to have a deep ...
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182 views

Formation of a black hole and Hawking radiation

From the perspective of an outside observer it takes infinitely long for the black hole to form. But if the black hole is no extremal black hole, it emits Hawking radiation. So the outside observer ...
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278 views

Why isn't Hawking radiation frozen on the boundary, like in-falling matter?

From the perspective of a far-away observer, matter falling into a black hole never crosses the boundary. Why doesn't a basic symmetry argument prove that Hawking radiation is therefore also frozen on ...
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442 views

Brans-Dicke gravity and Black-Hole “vacuum”

The field equations of the Brans-Dicke gravity are $$\Box\phi = \frac{8\pi}{3+2\omega}T$$ $$G_{ab} = \frac{8\pi}{\phi}T_{ab}+\frac{\omega}{\phi^2} ...
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893 views

Mathematical justification of Hartle-Hawking “no boundary” proposal

In Hartle-Hawking "no boundary" proposal it is proposed that Riemannian spacetimes rather than Lorentzian dominated the path integral near the big bang. Moments after the big bang however spacetimes ...
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Could the singularity that gave rise to our universe be past-eternal?

Are there any compelling models that include a past eternal singularity that ultimately gave rise to our universe? Does the "no-boundry" hypothesis that utilizes imaginary time have past eternal ...
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164 views

What does BICEP2's results tell us about gravitation waves and quantum gravity?

The BICEP2 results, unless I am mistaken, are a measurement of CMB polarization, i.e. photon polarization. That is, taken at face value they say nothing about gravity directly. Now, we can start to ...
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199 views

Squashed 3-sphere?

What is a squashed 3-sphere? In context of quantum gravity. I stumbled upon a term 'squashed 7 sphere' but that's concerning supersymmetry. Is it just normal 3-sphere metric, that is just 'squashed' ...
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80 views

Homeomorphism between the space of all Ashtekar connections and spacetime?

Excerpt from an essay of mine: Let $\Psi(\varsigma)$ be the wavefunction in the loop representation, where $\varsigma:[0,1]\to\mathcal{M}$, where $\mathcal{M}$ is spacetime. Then, let ...
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72 views

Normalizability of the Hartle-Hawking state in Liouville theory

I'm confused about how to normalize the Hartle-Hawking state in 2D quantum gravity. We can compute the HH state for two circles of length $\ell_1$ and $\ell_2$ in the matrix model as $\langle ...
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49 views

Attractiveness of spin 2 gauge theories [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is gravitation force always attractive? I have heard that the attractiveness of gravitation is due to the fact that it is a spin 2 gauge theory. Why is this so? I ...
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658 views

Special relativity paradox and gravitation/acceleration equivalence

One of the features of the black hole complementarity is the following : According to an external observer, the infinite time dilation at the horizon itself makes it appear as if it takes an ...
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89 views

Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory for flat- and AdS- spaces

The definition of Pohlmeyer invariants in flat-space (as per eq-2.16 in Urs Schreiber's DDF and Pohlmeyer invariants of (super)string) is the following: $ Z^{\mu_1...\mu_N} (\mathcal{P}) = ...
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212 views

Do spacelike singularities really exist in quantum gravity? [duplicate]

Do spacelike singularities really exist in quantum gravity? If the memory of anything which falls into a black hole can't get out, is there any sense in which the interior of the black hole is real? ...
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214 views

Can universal continuity be experimentally falsified?

It is an unresolved question whether the universe is discrete or continuous in its intricate quantum level structure. See for example: Is the universe finite and discrete? How could spacetime become ...
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1k views

Is there any relation between Planck constant and Gravitational constant?

Why is the Gravitational constant about $10^{23}$ times of the Planck constant in SI-units? Is there any relation between them? I mean Planck constant is about $6.6\times 10^{-34}$ $Js$ and ...
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3answers
220 views

Are there any QM effects where charged particles are not intimately involved?

Are there any QM effects that have been/could be measured from interactions involving non-charged particles? Elementary QM is all about the electron energy levels in the atom, photon - atom ...
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354 views

Are length contractions limited by Planck length?

While we are getting closer to speed of light our length in the direction of the movement is according to Lorentz transformation getting shorter. But we can not (even theoretically) consider length ...
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158 views

Why isn't our universe symmetric?

Why were random variations introduced in the spherically symmetric universe after Big Bang which made it non-symmetrical. Since the outcome of a coin toss depend on factors such as torque applied, air ...
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303 views

A Conceptual Problem With the Field Equations of General Relativity

I have two questions: Suppose that we have an amount of energy in the form of a perfect fluid in the right hand side of Einstein field equations (energy momentum tensor), this will lead to a ...