Any of the various explanations of gravity as a quantum theory, including string theory and loop quantum gravity.

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Formation of a black hole and Hawking radiation

From the perspective of an outside observer it takes infinitely long for the black hole to form. But if the black hole is no extremal black hole, it emits Hawking radiation. So the outside observer ...
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257 views

Why isn't Hawking radiation frozen on the boundary, like in-falling matter?

From the perspective of a far-away observer, matter falling into a black hole never crosses the boundary. Why doesn't a basic symmetry argument prove that Hawking radiation is therefore also frozen on ...
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416 views

Brans-Dicke gravity and Black-Hole “vacuum”

The field equations of the Brans-Dicke gravity are $$\Box\phi = \frac{8\pi}{3+2\omega}T$$ $$G_{ab} = \frac{8\pi}{\phi}T_{ab}+\frac{\omega}{\phi^2} ...
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744 views

Mathematical justification of Hartle-Hawking “no boundary” proposal

In Hartle-Hawking "no boundary" proposal it is proposed that Riemannian spacetimes rather than Lorentzian dominated the path integral near the big bang. Moments after the big bang however spacetimes ...
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Squashed 3-sphere?

What is a squashed 3-sphere? In context of quantum gravity. I stumbled upon a term 'squashed 7 sphere' but that's concerning supersymmetry. Is it just normal 3-sphere metric, that is just 'squashed' ...
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Homeomorphism between the space of all Ashtekar connections and spacetime?

Excerpt from an essay of mine: Let $\Psi(\varsigma)$ be the wavefunction in the loop representation, where $\varsigma:[0,1]\to\mathcal{M}$, where $\mathcal{M}$ is spacetime. Then, let ...
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57 views

Normalizability of the Hartle-Hawking state in Liouville theory

I'm confused about how to normalize the Hartle-Hawking state in 2D quantum gravity. We can compute the HH state for two circles of length $\ell_1$ and $\ell_2$ in the matrix model as $\langle ...
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48 views

Attractiveness of spin 2 gauge theories [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is gravitation force always attractive? I have heard that the attractiveness of gravitation is due to the fact that it is a spin 2 gauge theory. Why is this so? I ...
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81 views

Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory for flat- and AdS- spaces

The definition of Pohlmeyer invariants in flat-space (as per eq-2.16 in Urs Schreiber's DDF and Pohlmeyer invariants of (super)string) is the following: $ Z^{\mu_1...\mu_N} (\mathcal{P}) = ...
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Do spacelike singularities really exist in quantum gravity? [duplicate]

Do spacelike singularities really exist in quantum gravity? If the memory of anything which falls into a black hole can't get out, is there any sense in which the interior of the black hole is real? ...
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170 views

Can universal continuity be experimentally falsified?

It is an unresolved question whether the universe is discrete or continuous in its intricate quantum level structure. See for example: Is the universe finite and discrete? How could spacetime become ...
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200 views

Are there any QM effects where charged particles are not intimately involved?

Are there any QM effects that have been/could be measured from interactions involving non-charged particles? Elementary QM is all about the electron energy levels in the atom, photon - atom ...
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451 views

What happens to matter in extremely high gravity?

Though I am a software engineer, I have bit interest in sciences as well. I was reading about black holes and I thought if there is any existing research results on How matter gets affected because of ...
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193 views

Do physicists believe the singularity theorems to be accurate?

This question is largely based on the last post by reddit user RobotRollCall who gave some fantastic explanations of phenomena in relativity on a layman's level. About a year ago, she said: The ...
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219 views

What are the conditions to be satisfied by a theory in order to be a quantum theory?

This is in continuation to my previous question. It is not a duplicate of the previous one. This question arises because of the answers and discussions in that question. Can we call a theory, quantum ...
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750 views

Why is gravity weak at the quantum level?

Why is gravity stronger than other forces at the macroscopic level, yet weaker than other forces at the quantum level? Is there an explanation?
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337 views

Possibly naive question about quantized space-time

I beg your pardon in advance if this question is naive. In Quantum Mechanics, discrete values of measurements occur only in relation to bound states. This is because of the general solution for the ...
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422 views

Planck time, distance, mass? Why do we take those values?

Say we want to make an educated guess for critical values of time, distance and mass, where quantum gravity effects are supposed to be non-negligible. These values are given the prefix "Planck-". Now, ...
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220 views

Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today?

Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today? Planck's constant : $$h= 6.626068 × 10^{-34}\, m^2 kg / s,$$ $$E=n.h.\nu,$$ $$\epsilon=h.\nu$$
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464 views

Black Hole Singularities

If two black holes collide and then evaporate, do they leave behind two naked sigularities ore? If there are two, can we know how they interact?
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How does a gauge theory probe a spacetime singularity?

Within the framework of string theory, I have read in numerous articles such as the introduction of this this in which it is stated that the gauge theories living on a stack of D-branes can be used to ...
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193 views

Entropy of a naked singularity

According to the wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naked_singularity: "Some research has suggested that if loop quantum gravity is correct, then naked singularities could exist in nature, ...
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152 views

Phys.org Spectral geometry to unite relativity and quantum mechanics, restate in laymens terms?

Lingua Franca links relativity and quantum theories with spectral geometry Could someone give me a short synopsis of this article in laymens terms? What implications does this have in the physics ...
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372 views

Dirac Equation in General Relativity

Dirac equation for the massless fermions in curved spase time is $γ^ae^μ_aD_μΨ=0$, where $e^μ_a$ are the tetrads. I have to show that Dirac spinors obey the following equation: ...
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333 views

ADM Hamiltonian formalism and Quantum gravity

is there a Hamiltonian reformultion of gravity ?=? if so if we use the usual Quantization scheme we can not we quantizy the gravity ?? in terms of a Gauge Theory with the potential $ A_{\mu}^{i} $ ...
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676 views

Is string theory a quantum theory of gravity?

I have read that string theory predicts (or requires ?) the existence of gravitons. So, would that make it a quantum theory of gravity ? If so, I have also read that quantum gravity would allow us to ...
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489 views

Three-Dimensional Gravity

Does anyone have any references that discuss gravity in three-dimensions? I'm trying to make my way through some papers by Witten relating $SL(2,\mathbb{C})$ Chern-Simons theory and gravity in three ...
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186 views

Was TP Singh right to say that a theory of quantum gravity necessitates the Copenhagen Interpretation?

http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/174/1/012024 In the above link we see TP Singh arguing that only Copenhagen will work for a theory of quantum gravity. Some of his key points are "quantum theory ...
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33 views

Time Evolution of a Manifold Embedding

Given a smooth manifold $\mathcal{M}$ with a simplicial complex embedding $\mathsf{S}$, what specific tools or methods can be used to give an analysis of the time evolution of the manifold given some ...
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257 views

Planck time & length

Why is Planck time the shortest possible duration ever? It's defined as the duration needed by light to travel Planck's length, but surely, give me any number, I can give you a lower number than that? ...
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191 views

What are the implications of the Nesvizhevsky experiment and followup experiments with ultracold neutrons?

I remember reading about the groundbreaking experiment by Nesvizhevsky (et al. 2001) some 12 years ago using ultra-cold neutrons which showed the first experimental evidence of quantum gravity. It is ...
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223 views

what does holographic principle from string theory say about the possibilities of wormhole travel?

Is travel through stable macroscopic wormholes between remote points of spacetime going to be possible in a definitive theory of gravity, be it string theory or something beyond it? Physicists level ...
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238 views

Black hole entropy

Bekenstein and Hawking derived the expression for black hole entropy as, $$ S_{BH}={c^3 A\over 4 G \hbar}. $$ We know from the hindsight that entropy has statistical interpretation. It is a measure ...
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410 views

How is the expansion of space itself explained in LQG?

To explain the expansion of space I have often heard people saying that space is continuously created. This picture is usually applied to cosmological scales but I`m nevertheless curious if some ...
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179 views

Can the implications of dark energy be used to bridge the gap between Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity?

Can the findings of the Physics Nobel Laureates of 2011, namely the overpowering existence of dark energy (vacuum energy) have any implications in the quest the combine Quantum Mechanics and General ...
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276 views

Why does gravity forbid local observables?

I heard in a conference that gravity forbids to construct local gauge invariants like $\mathrm{Tr}\left\{−\frac{1}{4} F_{μν}^{a}F_{a}^{μν}\right\}$ and only allows non-local gauge invariant quantities ...
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423 views

Does spacetime really exist in quantum gravity?

If there are no localized observables in quantum gravity, does spacetime really exist, or might spacetime really be an illusion?
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Why doesn't the firewall argument also apply to far away ingoing modes?

Gidom Mera's answer at http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/45511 is illuminating, but on closer analysis, it brings up further puzzles. Backscattering works in both directions. Let's see what we get ...
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Macroscopic quantum gravity phenomena

A theory of quantum gravity is said to be needed when quantum and gravitational effects are strong at the same time i.e. at black hole singularities and at the big bang. This also makes it difficult ...
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348 views

Quantum mechanics + General relativity =?

I have learned (the basics) of how one can incorporate the principles of special relativity to quantum mechanics to obtain quantum field theory. Can the same be done with GR and QM to obtain a new ...
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What does BICEP2's results tell us about gravitation waves and quantum gravity?

The BICEP2 results, unless I am mistaken, are a measurement of CMB polarization, i.e. photon polarization. That is, taken at face value they say nothing about gravity directly. Now, we can start to ...
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125 views

what is 't Hooft up to? [closed]

apart of the 't Hooft diagrams that you all love (and find all sort of dualities starting with them) one of the venues 't Hooft works nowadays is apparently some sort of "deterministic representation ...
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155 views

What prediction led to the vacuum catastrophe?

The disagreement between predicted and measured energy density of the vacuum is one of the great unsolved problems of science. According to this book the predicted energy density was obtained as ...
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Stringy corrections to Friedmann equation

Does anyone know a reference or a paper which discusses string theory correction to Friedmann equations?
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183 views

Is inflation deterministic?

In some theories inflation is supposed to be able to turn quantum fluctuations into macroscopic inhomogeneities. I don't understand how an isolated system such as the universe can undergo such a ...
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96 views

How can any QM interpretations which use a linear Schrödinger Equation be used to quantitize gravity?

Since general relativity is nonlinear, how could we quantitize gravity with QM interpretations which use the linear Schrödinger Equation? Or is this fundamentally unworkable?
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165 views

Status of Teleparallel Quantum Gravity

There are several approches to incorporate torsion into a theory of gravity. According to this article, requiring a consistent coupling to Dirac fields leaves us with the Einstein-Cartan approach or ...
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63 views

Wick rotation for FRW in quantum gravity

There is no timelike Killing vector for FRW cosmologies. In the path integral formalism, is it possible to Wick rotate for quantum cosmology in quantum gravity? If yes, how? If no, how does one work ...
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379 views

Special relativity paradox and gravitation/acceleration equivalence

One of the features of the black hole complementarity is the following : According to an external observer, the infinite time dilation at the horizon itself makes it appear as if it takes an ...
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What methods are there to deal with quantum spatiotemporal chaos?

By now, there has been enough grasp on quantum chaos for systems with a small number of degrees of freedom. The major tool used is periodic orbit theory to approximate the spectral distribution. Is ...