Any of the various explanations of gravity as a quantum theory, including string theory and loop quantum gravity.

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Does Hawking radiation break asymptotic flatness?

Basically what the question says -- there is reason to expect that, if allowed to continue long enough for the radiation to reach future null infinity, the fact that the radiation will fall off at ...
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1answer
157 views

Hawking radiation for closely orbiting black holes

Suppose we have two black holes of radius $R_b$ orbiting at a distance $R_r$. I believe semi-classical approximations describe correctly the case where $R_r$ is much larger than the average black body ...
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348 views

Area law for Entropy in Loop Quantum Gravity

In connection with the long saga of the (claimed) microscopic calculations of the Hawking-Bekenstein entropy in (3+1) Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) and related approaches I have the following question: ...
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192 views

Significance for LQG of Sen's result on entropy of black holes?

Sen 2013 says, ...we apply Euclidean gravity to compute logarithmic corrections to the entropy of various non-extremal black holes in different dimensions [...] For Schwarzschild black holes in ...
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197 views

Why is the Planck length the shortest measurable length? [duplicate]

I quote from the Wikipedia article on Planck length: According to the generalized uncertainty principle, the Planck length is in principle, within a factor of order unity, the shortest ...
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451 views

Can the laws of quantum mechanics be derived from a more fundamental theory? [closed]

String theory takes quantum mechanics and tries to make it compatible with gravity. If it turns out to be a theory of everything then would it explain why our world is described by the laws of quantum ...
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2answers
468 views

What is the “foamy space” hypothesis that has been debunked recently?

In "Space-Time Is Smooth, Not Foamy", a Space.com article, it is stated: In his general theory of relativity, Einstein described space-time as fundamentally smooth, warping only under the strain ...
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246 views

Possibility of “graviballs”?

Looking at the relevant wikipedia page, one can read that the graviton should be massless. Is it 100 % certain that it is massless or is there room in any "nonstandard" models for a tiny non-zero mass ...
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342 views

Is there a simple layman way to explain the incompatibilities between quantum mechanics and (general) relativity to high school students?

Is there a simple layman way that I can use to explain the incompatibilities between quantum mechanics and (general) relativity to high school students (people with not much knowledge of the intricate ...
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284 views

How can one reconcile the temperature of a black hole with asymptotic flatness?

A stationary observer very close to the horizon of a black hole is immersed in a thermal bath of temperature that diverges as the horizon is approached. $$T^{-1} = 4\pi \sqrt{2M(r-2M)}$$ The ...
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1answer
1k views

Is Poincare recurrence relevant to our universe?

If the theory of everything indicates a singularity-free and finite universe, will Poincare recurrence be relevant to the universe? If so, is there any interesting physical consequence, e.g. in ...
6
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1answer
290 views

Why are geons unstable? Are there other problems with geons?

I read in various places geons are "generally considered unstable." Why? How solid is this reasoning? Is the reason geons are not studied much anymore because we can't make more progress without ...
6
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138 views

Regarding Non-renormalizatibility of GR

I've been doing some reading trying to get to a better understanding of some renormalization issues with the Einstein-Hilbert action. But, something odd came into mind that I'm hoping some users may ...
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1answer
254 views

Einstein action as a functional of the tetrad (first order formulation of gravity)

Let the Einstein-Hilbert action be rewritten as a functional of the tetrad $e$ (units shall be set to $1$) such that $S_{EH}(e)=\int \frac{1}{2}\epsilon_{IJKL}~e^I\wedge e^J\wedge F^{KL}(\omega(e))$, ...
6
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348 views

Is the quantization of gravity necessary for a quantum theory of gravity? Part II

(At the suggestion of the user markovchain, I have decided to take a very large edit/addition to the original question, and ask it as a separate question altogether.) Here it is: I have since ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the essence of BCFW recursion techniques?

I have recently briefly read about new methods as the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten (BCFW) on-shell recursion method. Can anybody please tell me about the essence of it? What does it mean for the ...
6
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1answer
475 views

Interpretation of the Einstein-Hilbert action

Everyone knows the famous Einstein-Hilbert action $S_{EH} = \int d^4x \sqrt{-g} R$. I'd like to know if, after we first explicit the Ricci scalar in terms of the metric, it could be possible to ...
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2answers
2k views

Physical laws prior the big bang (quantum fluctuations)

A theory among scientists says that quantum fluctuations caused the big bang and created the universe. This seems plausible to me. What I can't grasp yet is how a quantum fluctuation can even start ...
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1answer
139 views

Is there a black hole interior in black hole complementarity?

According to black hole complementarity, for an external observer, the interior of the black hole is replaced with a stretched horizon at a Planck distance above where the horizon ought to be. Is this ...
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2answers
175 views

Are timelike diffeomorphisms really redundancies in description in quantum gravity?

Are timelike diffeomorphisms really redundancies in description in quantum gravity? Certainly Yang-Mills gauge transformations can be considered redundancies in description. Ditto for p-form ...
6
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1answer
172 views

If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?

Are the more recently discovered symmetries in string theory such that the theories based on mirroring geometries are absolutely the same from an observable point of view? I have mirror symmetry ...
6
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1answer
454 views

Do we need a quantum deformation of the diffeomorphism group in string theory?

Let me justify my question before I go on. In string theory, gravitons are strings extended over space. Longitudinal gravitons are pure gauge modes of the diffeomorphism group. However, in string ...
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2answers
140 views

Dirac bracket and second class constraints in first-order gravity formalism

In the first order formulation of general relativity, the frame field $e_{\mu}^a$ and $\mathrm{SO}(3,1)$ spin connection $\omega_{\mu c}^b$ are independent variables. In the Hamiltonian formulation of ...
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319 views

From the perspective of an observer inside a black hole's horizon, where does the energy for Hawking radiation come from?

Would energy be seen to "flow" to the outside of the black hole? Through what mechanism?
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1answer
480 views

Are there any versions of LQG that claim to not violate Lorentz symmetry?

LQG formulations have a minimum length/area. Since say, a Planck area can always be boosted, any minimum area in space can be shrunk. Do LQG proponents worry about local Lorentz invariance violation, ...
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234 views

What are Galileons good for?

Lately I've seen many papers (for example "The galileon as a local modification of gravity"; 292 total hits on the arXiv) on types of field theories known as Galileons, and I'm wondering what the ...
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138 views

What do we learn from gravity in three spacetime dimensions?

The last decades there has been a lot of research going on in the the area of three dimensional gravity. The motivation, I understand, is threefold: Whereas gravity is not perturbatively ...
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252 views

Finite quantum gravity?

I'm working through an article that has some questionable assertions. The article is by Frank Tipler, "The structure of the world from pure numbers". (I'm going to ignore the fact that some of ...
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3answers
177 views

why nontrivially space-like connected event horizons do not respect unitarity?

I want to understand the assertion that the gluing between distant event horizons is forbidden by unitarity. What is exactly the argument that unitarity will necessarily forbid topological nontrivial ...
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151 views

Can we have consistent histories inside a black hole?

A consistent history is a POVM set of observables corresponding to a time-ordered product of projection operators. For gauge theories, not any old operator will do, only gauge-invariant observables. ...
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2answers
747 views

Global symmetries in quantum gravity

In several papers (including a recent one by Banks and Seiberg) people mention a "folk-theorem" about the impossibility to have global symmetries in a consistent theory of quantum gravity. I remember ...
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2answers
602 views

Does perturbation theory break down for quantum gravity?

Perturbation theory presumes we have a valid family of models over some continuous (infinitely differentiable, in fact) range for some parameters, i.e. coupling constants. We have some special values ...
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4answers
715 views

Does string theory tells us anything concrete about black hole decay?

EDIT: I edited the question to reflect Moshe's objections. Please, look at it again. It's apparently a black hole time around here so I decided to ask a question of my own. After a few generic ...
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352 views

Does general relativity fail in conditions with very large gravitational forces?

It is said in this wikipedia article (in the 7th paragraph) that where there exists huge masses and very large gravitational forces (like around binary pulsars), general relativistic effects can be ...
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1k views

Why are there 4 Dimensions and 4 Fundamental Forces?

Is it a coincidence that there are four fundamental forces and four spacetime dimensions ? Does a universe with three spacetime dimension contain four fundamental forces? Can magnetism be realized in ...
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3answers
191 views

Gravity - Force or Result?

I am no Physicist, but I enjoy reading about Physics. However reading about leading theories such as M-Theory and others they speculate about the existence of the Graviton. In my past reading of ...
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1answer
475 views

Naive quantum gravity

My question involves an analogy I have to point out. Consider the Lagrangian density for the a complex scalar field: \begin{equation} ...
5
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1answer
424 views

Do all the forces become one?

Were the forces of nature combined in one unifying force at the time of the Big Bang? By which symmetry is this unification governed? Are there any evidence for such unification of forces? Has ever ...
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3answers
1k views

What is background independence and how important is it?

What is background independence and how important is it? In order to be a theory of everything, will the final string-theory/m-theory have to be background independent? Does the current lack of ...
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3answers
334 views

Information loss in a black hole

How does the Holographic Principle help to establish the fact that all the information is not lost in a black hole?
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2answers
1k views

Critics of Mannheim's Conformal Gravity Theory?

I'm looking for more articles/reactions/critiques/support for Philip Mannheim's recent conformal gravity theory. See here: http://arxiv.org/abs/1101.2186v1 Any ideas on where to start?
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321 views

What is necessary for a causal set to be manifold-like?

A causal set is a poset which is reflexive, antisymmetric, transitive and locally finite. As a motivation, there is a programme to model spacetime as fundamentally discrete, with causal sets ...
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2answers
2k views

How does String Theory predict Gravity? [duplicate]

Firstly, General Relativity states that Spacetime is dynamic and is consonant with the distribution of matter/energy. How does String Theory predict gravity, when it is background dependent, that is ...
5
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1answer
107 views

Quantum causal structure

We take causal structure to be some relation defined over elements which are understood to be morphisms of some category. An example of such a relation is a domain, another is a directed acyclic ...
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2answers
125 views

Bekenstein bound for electron?

Using the Wikipedia version of the Bekenstein bound, and substituting the Wikipedia values for electron mass and radius, one obtains 0.0662 bits. Does this really mean that a system, any system, ...
5
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1answer
574 views

How do I quantize a classical field theory

I have not been able to find any information about this on the Internet. I am a middle-schooler, 14, who self-studies physics, and I know up to and including ODEs, and some of the calculus of ...
5
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1answer
194 views

The Unruh effect for temporarily accelerated particles

Do temporarily accelerated particles experience the Unruh effect? I think, they don't, because they don't see an apparent event horizon. On the other hand, if the duration of the acceleration is long ...
5
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1answer
425 views

Quantum Gravity and Calculations of Mercury's Perihelion

In an astronomy forum that I frequent, I have been having a discussion where the state of quantum gravity research came up. I claimed that Loop Quantum Gravity theories couldn't prove GR in the ...
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88 views

Speed of gravity within a mass

We all consider that gravity travels at the speed of light. Light travels at the speed of light except when it is in a medium ,say glass, where it travels slower. What happens when gravity passes ...
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91 views

Would the presence of B-modes in the CMB provide evidence for quantum gravity?

Finding B-modes in the CMB (which aren't due to foreground contamination) would be evidence for gravitational waves, because they cannot be produced by density perturbations (to first order, is my ...