Any of the various explanations of gravity as a quantum theory, including string theory and loop quantum gravity.

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From the perspective of an observer inside a black hole's horizon, where does the energy for Hawking radiation come from?

Would energy be seen to "flow" to the outside of the black hole? Through what mechanism?
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353 views

Are there any versions of LQG that claim to not violate Lorentz symmetry?

LQG formulations have a minimum length/area. Since say, a Planck area can always be boosted, any minimum area in space can be shrunk. Do LQG proponents worry about local Lorentz invariance violation, ...
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362 views

Can the laws of quantum mechanics be derived from a more fundamental theory? [closed]

String theory takes quantum mechanics and tries to make it compatible with gravity. If it turns out to be a theory of everything then would it explain why our world is described by the laws of quantum ...
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172 views

Finite quantum gravity?

I'm working through an article that has some questionable assertions. The article is by Frank Tipler, "The structure of the world from pure numbers". (I'm going to ignore the fact that some of ...
6
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3answers
174 views

why nontrivially space-like connected event horizons do not respect unitarity?

I want to understand the assertion that the gluing between distant event horizons is forbidden by unitarity. What is exactly the argument that unitarity will necessarily forbid topological nontrivial ...
6
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2answers
499 views

Does perturbation theory break down for quantum gravity?

Perturbation theory presumes we have a valid family of models over some continuous (infinitely differentiable, in fact) range for some parameters, i.e. coupling constants. We have some special values ...
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569 views

Does string theory tells us anything concrete about black hole decay?

EDIT: I edited the question to reflect Moshe's objections. Please, look at it again. It's apparently a black hole time around here so I decided to ask a question of my own. After a few generic ...
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2answers
199 views

Does general relativity fail in conditions with very large gravitational forces?

It is said in this wikipedia article (in the 7th paragraph) that where there exists huge masses and very large gravitational forces (like around binary pulsars), general relativistic effects can be ...
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1answer
391 views

Do all the forces become one?

Were the forces of nature combined in one unifying force at the time of the Big Bang? By which symmetry is this unification governed? Are there any evidence for such unification of forces? Has ever ...
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762 views

Why are there 4 Dimensions and 4 Fundamental Forces?

Is it a coincidence that there are four fundamental forces and four spacetime dimensions ? Does a universe with three spacetime dimension contain four fundamental forces? Can magnetism be realized in ...
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2answers
707 views

What is background independence and how important is it?

What is background independence and how important is it? In order to be a theory of everything, will the final string-theory/m-theory have to be background independent? Does the current lack of ...
5
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3answers
293 views

Information loss in a black hole

How does the Holographic Principle help to establish the fact that all the information is not lost in a black hole?
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1answer
78 views

Quantum causal structure

We take causal structure to be some relation defined over elements which are understood to be morphisms of some category. An example of such a relation is a domain, another is a directed acyclic ...
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1answer
213 views

Why are geons unstable? Are there other problems with geons?

I read in various places geons are "generally considered unstable." Why? How solid is this reasoning? Is the reason geons are not studied much anymore because we can't make more progress without ...
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2answers
647 views

Critics of Mannheim's Conformal Gravity Theory?

I'm looking for more articles/reactions/critiques/support for Philip Mannheim's recent conformal gravity theory. See here: http://arxiv.org/abs/1101.2186v1 Any ideas on where to start?
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1answer
129 views

Einstein action as a functional of the tetrad (first order formulation of gravity)

Let the Einstein-Hilbert action be rewritten as a functional of the tetrad $e$ (units shall be set to $1$) such that $S_{EH}(e)=\int \frac{1}{2}\epsilon_{IJKL}~e^I\wedge e^J\wedge F^{KL}(\omega(e))$, ...
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1answer
132 views

The Unruh effect for temporarily accelerated particles

Do temporarily accelerated particles experience the Unruh effect? I think, they don't, because they don't see an apparent event horizon. On the other hand, if the duration of the acceleration is long ...
5
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1answer
386 views

Interpretation of the Einstein-Hilbert action

Everyone knows the famous Einstein-Hilbert action $S_{EH} = \int d^4x \sqrt{-g} R$. I'd like to know if, after we first explicit the Ricci scalar in terms of the metric, it could be possible to ...
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1answer
354 views

Quantum Gravity and Calculations of Mercury's Perihelion

In an astronomy forum that I frequent, I have been having a discussion where the state of quantum gravity research came up. I claimed that Loop Quantum Gravity theories couldn't prove GR in the ...
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1answer
189 views

What are the arguments for gravity not being a force? (in quantum gravity)

In quantum gravity the standard assumtion is that gravity is a force, although there is a small but persistent group of theorethical physicists who think otherwise. What gives us the motivation to ...
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1answer
97 views

Is there a black hole interior in black hole complementarity?

According to black hole complementarity, for an external observer, the interior of the black hole is replaced with a stretched horizon at a Planck distance above where the horizon ought to be. Is this ...
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2answers
212 views

Hayden-Preskill informational mirrors and decryption

I do have a question about an assumption made in the very interesting Hayden-Preskill paper of black holes as informational mirrors. Alice throws her top secret quantum diary which is $k$ qubits long ...
5
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1answer
265 views

Why can't fermions be affected by effective gravity in non-linear quantum electrodynamics?

Quantum electrodynamics based upon Euler-Heisenberg or Born-Infeld Lagrangians predict photons to move according to an effective metric which is dependent on the background electromagnetic field. In ...
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95 views

What do we learn from gravity in three spacetime dimensions?

The last decades there has been a lot of research going on in the the area of three dimensional gravity. The motivation, I understand, is threefold: Whereas gravity is not perturbatively ...
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160 views

Significance for LQG of Sen's result on entropy of black holes?

Sen 2013 says, ...we apply Euclidean gravity to compute logarithmic corrections to the entropy of various non-extremal black holes in different dimensions [...] For Schwarzschild black holes in ...
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148 views

Implications of Unruh-inertia to theories of gravity

If it turns out to be true that the galaxy rotation curves can be explained away by Unruh modes that become greater than the Hubble scale at accelerations around $10^{-10} m/s^2$ as proposed in here, ...
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134 views

Geometric entropy vs entanglement entropy (dependent on curvature coupling parameter)

I have a quick question. In hep-th/9506066, Larsen and Wilczek calculated the geometric entropy (which I believe is just another name for entanglement entropy) for a non-minimally coupled scalar field ...
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129 views

Can we have consistent histories inside a black hole?

A consistent history is a POVM set of observables corresponding to a time-ordered product of projection operators. For gauge theories, not any old operator will do, only gauge-invariant observables. ...
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1answer
402 views

Does anyone take the Wightman axioms seriously?

Does anyone take the Wightman axioms seriously? Mainly with respect to quantum gravity or gauge theores, abelian or non-abelian? Anyone doing any research on axiomatization of QFTs in some way?
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3answers
870 views

Give a description of M-theory your grandmother can understand

Inspired by this question, let me ask a similar question. Is it possible to do the same (give a description of M-theory your grandmother could understand)for M theory? While I know even experts don't ...
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2answers
714 views

What is energy in string theory?

Facts agreed on by most Physicists - GR: One can't apply Noether's theorem to argue there is a conserved energy. QFT: One can apply Noether's theorem to argue there is a conserved energy. String ...
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605 views

Gravity as a gauge theory

Currently, (classical) gravity (General Relativity) is NOT a gauge theory (at least in the sense of a Yang-Mills theory). Why should "classical" gravity be some (non-trivial or "special" or ...
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3answers
335 views

Question on inflation

I have two particular questions regarding the inflationary scenario. They are: 1.) What is the physical origin of the inflaton field? 2.) Why has the potential of the inflation field its particular ...
4
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2answers
601 views

What happens to a photon in a black hole?

Assume a photon enters the event horizon of a black hole. The gravity of the black hole will draw the photon into the singularity eventually. Doesn't the photon come to rest and therefore lose it's ...
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3answers
738 views

What are some approaches to discrete space-time used in modern physics?

This thought gave rise to some new questions in my mind. What are the consequences for: How would it affect duality i.e. particle, wave property of photons? How does this statement affect the ...
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264 views

Naive quantum gravity

My question involves an analogy I have to point out. Consider the Lagrangian density for the a complex scalar field: \begin{equation} ...
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2answers
506 views

The Uncertainty Principle and Black Holes

What are the consequences of applying the uncertainty principle to black holes? Does the uncertainty principle need to be modified in the context of a black hole and if so what are the implications ...
4
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2answers
254 views

Assuming that extra dimensions will not be visible at LHC, what motivation will still remain to study them?

Many physicists believe that there is little possibility of observing extra dimensions at LHC so that some extra dimension models originally designed to solve hierarchy problem (ADD/Randall-Sundrum) ...
4
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2answers
266 views

What specifically are the measurements that correspond to fixing the infinite number of counterterms in quantum gravity?

I understand that quantum gravity is nonrenormalizable because there are an infinite number of counterterms. In QED the counterterms correspond to the loop corrections to the vertex function as well ...
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4answers
588 views

Question regarding the validity of the big bounce

I have several questions regarding the "big bounce" theory. It appears to be popular among LQG researchers. My questions are as as follows. 1) How one reconciles it with the fact that it is now ...
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2answers
543 views

Are all points in the universe connected?

Is it true that every point in the universe is connected or could be so theoretically? If so how is this mediated? Is it through the quantum nature of the fabric of space or is it through the ...
4
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3answers
291 views

What is necessary for a causal set to be manifold-like?

A causal set is a poset which is reflexive, antisymmetric, transitive and locally finite. As a motivation, there is a programme to model spacetime as fundamentally discrete, with causal sets ...
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260 views

Does the existence of dualities imply a more fundamental structure?

I was wondering if the existence of some kind of duality in physics always implies the existence of some underlying more fundamental structure/concept? Let me give a few example from history: ...
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1answer
712 views

What do “tachionic” neutrinos mean for QG?

Reading about the spectacular Opera claim, I`m (again ;-P) wondering if a confirmation of superliminous neutrinos could help settle some still open quantum gravity issues ...? In this post, Lumo ...
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1answer
61 views

Derivation of metric of space time with a point source in 2+1 dimension using ADM formalism

In "Quantum Gravity in 2+1 dimension" by S Carlip, Sec 3.1 (where the metric of a spacetime with a point source is derived, using the ADM formalism), equation 3.8 states that (this is the momentum ...
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1answer
240 views

Is the quantization of gravity necessary for a quantum theory of gravity? Part II

(At the suggestion of the user markovchain, I have decided to take a very large edit/addition to the original question, and ask it as a separate question altogether.) Here it is: I have since ...
4
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1answer
918 views

What is the essence of BCFW recursion techniques?

I have recently briefly read about new methods as the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten (BCFW) on-shell recursion method. Can anybody please tell me about the essence of it? What does it mean for the ...
4
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1answer
239 views

What does AdS/CFT have to say about quantum gravity in our world?

The Ads side of the AdS/CFT correspondence is a model of quantum gravity in 5 dimensional antidesitter space. What can it say about quantum gravity in our 4-spacetime dimensions? Or is it just a toy ...
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1answer
414 views

What are the theoretical explanations behind the “no-boundary condition” in cosmology?

In his book "The Grand Design" on page 167-173 Stephen Hawking explains how one can get rid of the so called "time zero issue", meaning by this the very special initial state needed for inflation to ...
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158 views

AdS to dS uplifting and its opposite

So as I understand it, localized structures in AdS can wick rotated to dS, the boundary has to be complixified as can be seen here. Also, uplifting is another technique that can be used to move from ...