2
votes
1answer
49 views

Can weakness of gravity explore new dimensions

Since gravitational force is weakest force out of the four fundamental fources at the microscopic level. Is it possible that gravitational force is strong in a particular direction at a new ...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

Wouldn't angular momentum of a binary star system decrease?

Consider a binary star system, as these stars go around one another they would emit gravitational waves. Since, the graviton is a spin 2 particle. Wouldn't the angular momentum of the stars decrease? ...
8
votes
1answer
669 views

Why quantising gravity necessarily give us gravitons?

Gravitons are supposed to be the quanta of gravitational field My question is, if we do not know how to quantize gravity yet, how do we know that quantizing it in principle should give us gravitons, ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Two small objects are placed at rest in an empty universe a great distance apart. Given an infinite amount of time will gravity cause them to meet? [closed]

Let's say the objects are marble size or even single atoms or quarks. They are placed in an otherwise empty universe(expanding or non-expanding) at opposite ends of the universe with an arbitrarily ...
3
votes
0answers
56 views

Squashed 3-sphere?

What is a squashed 3-sphere? In context of quantum gravity. I stumbled upon a term 'squashed 7 sphere' but that's concerning supersymmetry. Is it just normal 3-sphere metric, that is just 'squashed' ...
5
votes
1answer
191 views

What are the arguments for gravity not being a force? (in quantum gravity)

In quantum gravity the standard assumtion is that gravity is a force, although there is a small but persistent group of theorethical physicists who think otherwise. What gives us the motivation to ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Gravitational interactions by energy?

The mass-energy equivalence, first established by Einstein is an important and highly discussed phenomenon in physics. Without claiming much knowledge about high-end discussions on this topic, I would ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

How does Hawking radiation grow as a black hole evaporates?

The temperature of Hawking radiation is inversely proportional to the mass of a black hole, $T_{\rm H}\propto M_{\rm BH}^{-1}$, and so as the black hole shrinks the temperature of the radiation should ...
5
votes
1answer
268 views

Naive quantum gravity

My question involves an analogy I have to point out. Consider the Lagrangian density for the a complex scalar field: \begin{equation} ...
3
votes
1answer
126 views

Divergence of One and Two Graviton Exchanges

At the bottom of pg. 3, Kiritsis states the following To appreciate the difficulties with the quantization of Einstein gravity, we look at a single-graviton exchange between two particles (Fig. ...
0
votes
2answers
150 views

How do gravitons impact on general relativity?

As I'm reading about GR a lot lately, I was wondering: how do gravitons (if they exist ofc) impact the general relativity? Since in GR, when we look at particles moving in space-time, we are only ...
5
votes
2answers
620 views

Gravity as a gauge theory

Currently, (classical) gravity (General Relativity) is NOT a gauge theory (at least in the sense of a Yang-Mills theory). Why should "classical" gravity be some (non-trivial or "special" or ...
-3
votes
1answer
92 views

Has anyone measure the strength of the force of gravity in relation to the molecular bonding? [closed]

It's clear to me that gravity it a function of mass. It is also clear to me that gasses are less affected by gravity. So I'm thinking that there exists a measurable minimum binding distance $d$ ...
1
vote
2answers
260 views

In which direction do gravitons travel? Do they originate from mass or are they collected by masses?

This is a kind of silly question, that mostly goes unanswered: are gravitons detatched from the objects they act on, like photons in free space. Maybe gravity or gravitons are collected by mass ...
5
votes
1answer
129 views

Einstein action as a functional of the tetrad (first order formulation of gravity)

Let the Einstein-Hilbert action be rewritten as a functional of the tetrad $e$ (units shall be set to $1$) such that $S_{EH}(e)=\int \frac{1}{2}\epsilon_{IJKL}~e^I\wedge e^J\wedge F^{KL}(\omega(e))$, ...
0
votes
1answer
134 views

can be exist the negative mass? [duplicate]

I'm not sure about this but I guess there must be negative masses in the universe because of the symmetry. If the gravity is one of the main forces in nature it must has negatives mass to be able to ...
24
votes
2answers
1k views

Why is gravity such a unique force?

My knowledge on this particular field of physics is very sketchy, but I frequently hear of a theoretical "graviton", the quantum of the gravitational field. So I guess most physicists' assumption is ...
4
votes
1answer
241 views

Is the quantization of gravity necessary for a quantum theory of gravity? Part II

(At the suggestion of the user markovchain, I have decided to take a very large edit/addition to the original question, and ask it as a separate question altogether.) Here it is: I have since ...
15
votes
6answers
1k views

Is the quantization of gravity necessary for a quantum theory of gravity?

The other day in my string theory class, I asked the professor why we wanted to quantize gravity, in the sense that we want to treat the metric on space-time as a quantum field, as opposed to, for ...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

Attractiveness of spin 2 gauge theories [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is gravitation force always attractive? I have heard that the attractiveness of gravitation is due to the fact that it is a spin 2 gauge theory. Why is this so? I ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

Formation of a black hole and Hawking radiation

From the perspective of an outside observer it takes infinitely long for the black hole to form. But if the black hole is no extremal black hole, it emits Hawking radiation. So the outside observer ...
2
votes
1answer
379 views

Special relativity paradox and gravitation/acceleration equivalence

One of the features of the black hole complementarity is the following : According to an external observer, the infinite time dilation at the horizon itself makes it appear as if it takes an ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Thermal gravitational radiation and its detection

To my poor knowledge on the topic, the gravitational waves that are most likely to be detected by LIGO or other experiments do not have thermal spectrum. But I'm not certain. I know that Hawking's ...
1
vote
2answers
409 views

Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?

So, we know that when two objects of normal matter get away from each other, the gravitational pull they feel from each other, decreases. I wanted to see how that would work. And in my ...
0
votes
2answers
250 views

How do we end up with a gravity-dominant macroscopic universe from a quantum world having weakest gravity?

At quantum scale, gravity is the weakest force. Its even negligible in front of weak force, electromagnetic force, strong force. At macroscopic scale, we see gravity everywhere. Its actually ruling ...
-6
votes
2answers
241 views

Why did Standard Model never sense a requirement to include gravitational quantum? [closed]

Standard Model is advanced (lorentz invariant) version of Quantum physics. It tried to include everything which came in the way while understanding quantum world. It even didn't bother to include ...
2
votes
3answers
454 views

What happens to matter in extremely high gravity?

Though I am a software engineer, I have bit interest in sciences as well. I was reading about black holes and I thought if there is any existing research results on How matter gets affected because of ...
3
votes
1answer
255 views

Gravity and Planck scale

What is the connection between Planck's constant and gravity? Why is the Planck scale the natural scale for quantum gravity? I would have though the scale would be related to G, not h.
3
votes
2answers
706 views

Why does the force of gravity get weaker as it travels through the dimensions?

Some theories predict that the graviton exists in a dimension that we of course can't see, and that is why the force of gravity is so weak. Because by the time gravity has got from the dimension in ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

How does gravity force get transmitted?

How does gravity force get transmitted? It is not transmitted by particles I guess. Because if it was, then its propagation speed would be limited by the speed of light. If it is not transmitted by ...
2
votes
4answers
751 views

Why is gravity weak at the quantum level?

Why is gravity stronger than other forces at the macroscopic level, yet weaker than other forces at the quantum level? Is there an explanation?
3
votes
1answer
332 views

Why are there Gravitons among the modes of oscillation in String Theory?

Why are gravitons present among the modes of oscillation of the 'strings' in String Theory?
2
votes
0answers
123 views

What results from particle collision would ensure the existence of the graviton?

I understand that particles are smashed together to try to enable us to detect some sort of graviton presence but we can't actually detect a graviton due to the fact that it 'exists' in some extra ...
6
votes
1answer
117 views

Quantum mechanical gravitational bound states

The quantum mechanics of Coloumb-force bound states of atomic nuclei and electrons lead to the extremely rich theory of molecules. In particular, I think the richness of the theory is related to the ...
14
votes
1answer
114 views

Instantons and Non Perturbative Amplitudes in Gravity

In perturbative QFT in flat spacetime the perturbation expansion typically does not converge, and estimates of the large order behaviour of perturbative amplitudes reveals ambiguity of the ...
6
votes
2answers
239 views

Possibility of “graviballs”?

Looking at the relevant wikipedia page, one can read that the graviton should be massless. Is it 100 % certain that it is massless or is there room in any "nonstandard" models for a tiny non-zero mass ...
1
vote
1answer
179 views

Sun-Earth Virtual Gravitons?

How many virtual gravitons do the sun and earth exchange in one year? What are their wavelengths?
6
votes
2answers
318 views

The energy of a Graviton

Maybe another stupid question, but what's the energy of a graviton? Is it $\hbar \omega$? Does it emit gravitons when an apple falls onto the ground, like photons be emitted when an electron transits ...
2
votes
2answers
489 views

Three-Dimensional Gravity

Does anyone have any references that discuss gravity in three-dimensions? I'm trying to make my way through some papers by Witten relating $SL(2,\mathbb{C})$ Chern-Simons theory and gravity in three ...
7
votes
1answer
550 views

Quantization of Gravitational Field: Quantization conditions

I'm begining to study Quantization of field with the second quantization formalism. I've studied phononic field, electromagnetic field in the vacuum and a generic relativistical scalar field. I ...
11
votes
4answers
737 views

Why is there a search for an exchange particle for gravity?

If I understand correctly, according to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, mass results in a distortion in space-time. In turn, the motion of the mass is affected by the distortion. A result of ...
5
votes
1answer
355 views

Quantum Gravity and Calculations of Mercury's Perihelion

In an astronomy forum that I frequent, I have been having a discussion where the state of quantum gravity research came up. I claimed that Loop Quantum Gravity theories couldn't prove GR in the ...