Any of the various explanations of gravity as a quantum theory, including string theory and loop quantum gravity.

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Black Hole singularity in Loop Quantum Gravity

How is the singularity of a Black Hole treated in Loop Quantum gravity ? Does it go away ? And if it does, what's after the event horizon ?
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Quantum Gravity Singularity Question?

I am not a expert in QG (Quantum Gravity) or GR (General Relativity) for that matter so please forgive if I make any small mistakes, its just a curious question but I know that a singularity is a ...
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29 views

Value of Planck scale

I read several times that the Planck scale is the energy scale at which the effects of gravity are comparable to the effects of the other fundamental forces. How can I show that this actually happens ...
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Would the presence of B-modes in the CMB provide evidence for quantum gravity?

Finding B-modes in the CMB (which aren't due to foreground contamination) would be evidence for gravitational waves, because they cannot be produced by density perturbations (to first order, is my ...
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Is there a 2D manifold on which the Dirac equation has a zero mode?

The two-dimensional (2D) Dirac equation $(\sigma_1iD_1+\sigma_2 iD_2)\psi=E\psi$ admits zero mode ($E=0$) solutions on a non-trivial gauge background, such as the zero mode at the core of a U(1) gauge ...
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61 views

Why is the universe 3D if the holographic principle says it's encoded in a its surface?

The way I understand the holographic principle is that everything in a 3D space can be thought of as living on the 2D boundary of that space. If that is the case, why does everything in the universe ...
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58 views

What is meant by the following divergent formula?

I have encountered the following formula a couple of times (in different physics contexts which I do not have a good understanding of) $$\int_{0}^\infty \frac{dt}{t}e^{-tx}=-\log x$$ Formally one ...
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24 views

Gravitational wave contribution of the Hawking radiation from a black hole

Black holes are expected to radiate like a perfect black radiator at the Hawking temperature, which means that they'll emit all particles according to the relevant formulas one can derive using ...
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87 views

How can gravitions exist without violating GR? [duplicate]

How can gravitions exist without violating GR, since GR says that gravity is curvature in space-time.
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37 views

Decomposition of the gravitino into helicity $\pm \frac{3}{2}$ and $\pm \frac{1}{2}$ components

I'm reading this book on string theory. When they decompose two dimensional gravitino (formula 7.16) $$ \chi_\alpha = \frac{1}{2}\rho^\beta \rho_\alpha \chi_\beta + \frac{1}{2}\rho_\alpha \rho^\gamma ...
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386 views

Are length contractions limited by Planck length?

While we are getting closer to speed of light our length in the direction of the movement is according to Lorentz transformation getting shorter. But we can not (even theoretically) consider length ...
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How does one experience single gravitons and/or Planck-force?

Moving sufficiently far away from a light source one would not be able to measure a steady stream of light, but only single photons every now an then. The experience would be a very faint blinking. ...
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Could future experiments on “Gravitational Casimir Effect” confirm the existence of gravitons?

From Casimir effect, we know that when two plates are placed very close to each other in vacuum, they attract each other because the quantum fluctuations that press on the two plates' outer surfaces ...
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Why doesn't matter clump together such that it can't be taken apart again?

Given the inverse square law force of gravity shouldn't two particles that are infinitely close to each other be infinitely attracted to one another? For example, suppose the hands of some super deity ...
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91 views

Gravity as a particle-based force vs space-time warp

I'm interested to understand the interpretation of gravity as a result of exchange of force particles (ie gravitons) vs General Relativity-based warping of space-time. Related to this is while a ...
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39 views

Would a directional “graviton” emitter violate any known laws of physics?

Setting aside that we don't known what the mediating partial in quantum gravity looks like and have no way to manipulate it, what would the implications be of a directional graviton source be? Would ...
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142 views

How does this new theory of a possible infinitely old universe not violate the second law of thermodynamics

I read the following article: http://phys.org/news/2015-02-big-quantum-equation-universe.html And followed it back to this journal reference : http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.3093 It appears to be ...
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90 views

Theories that predict the number of space-time dimensions

My impression in that most theories assume three spatial dimensions and one temporal dimension, though could in principle be formulated in others numbers of dimensions without inconsistencies. I know, ...
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60 views

What does quantum gravity look like at or beyond the Planck scale?

I am reading an article called The fundamental nature of space and time by Gerard 't Hooft. On page 3 he writes the following: Physically, however, the perturbative approach fails. The difficulty ...
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Is black hole complementarity compatible with canonical quantization?

Suppose at time $t$, Alice and Bob are hovering just outside the event horizon of a black hole, sharing the same position, velocity and acceleration. Shortly afterward, in less than the Schwarzschild ...
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Ground state energy in a simple quantum gravity situation

I found this problem in an MIT undergrad QM problem set; it is problem number 2, part a, number iv. I'll summarize everything below, but here's the link: ...
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53 views

Gravitational singularity

Is it possible that the gravitational singularity actually turns out to be a genuine singularity once we have a true theory of quantum gravity in place. There is a lot of talk about singularity but ...
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339 views

The cap on massive particles's speed is below the speed of light due to Planck length?

This answer http://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/a/8525/1991 claims that no particle can accelerate further after its de Broglie wavelength becomes Planck length. Given that speed at this point is ...
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118 views

Renormalization in Classical Field Theory

1) The statement that general relativity (GR) is not renormalizable - is it a statement only about the quantization of GR or is it non-renormalizable also as a classical field theory? 2) More ...
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Information loss from entanglement and cosmological horizons?

Suppose we have a qubit P in an unknown quantum state. Unknown as in we didn't prepare it, and don't know how it was prepared either. Without measuring the qubit in any way, we encode it into two ...
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Are there any proposed alternatives to quantum mechanics as there are alternatives to general relativity?

There are a lot of alternatives to general relativity and one of the motivations is attempting to formulate a working theory of quantum gravity. In some limit they reduce to general relativity. But ...
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Why don't we have a theory of everything?

What is currently stopping us from having a theory of everything? i.e. what mathematical barriers, or others, are stopping us from unifying GR and QM? I have read that string theory is a means to ...
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99 views

Can Einstein's 'Theory of General Relativity' exist in Harmony with 'Quantum Mechanics'? [closed]

From the Book 'In Search of Schrodinger's Cat': Coordinates in space-time represent position; causality depends on knowing precisely where things are going, essentially on knowing their momentum. ...
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How would gravitons be detected? [duplicate]

How would gravitons be detected indirectly or directly, in space or on earth? And what experiments are going on to find gravitons?
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No Hair systems and black hole entropy

To my understanding, a black hole is a no hair system. So it can be described just by its mass, spin and charge. In other words it does not differentiate where its mass comes from, so it could be made ...
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What exactly is black hole complementarity and why is it necessary for solving black hole information paradox?

What exactly is black hole complementarity and why is it necessary for solving black hole information paradox? The first question is about the story of vacuum fluctuation causing Hawking radiations. ...
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Why is the value of the action integral in general relativity the same on all regions that are homologous?

In their famous paper Action integrals and partition functions in quantum gravity, Gibbons and Hawking argue that in order to avoid the singularity of a Schwarzschild black hole you can complexify ...
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174 views

Why isn't our universe symmetric?

Why were random variations introduced in the spherically symmetric universe after Big Bang which made it non-symmetrical. Since the outcome of a coin toss depend on factors such as torque applied, air ...
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That the gravitational mass equals to inertial mass can imply that only Einstein-Hilbert action is satisfied

I read Spacetime and Geometry by Sean Carroll. In p. 166 there is a comment that GR's action is nonlinear because if it is linear like the EM field, then graviton will not interact with each other, ...
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Regarding Randall Sundrum model

In Randall Sundrum model 2, that is the one with non compact fifth dimension, there is only one brane, which is the Planck brane. The TeV brane is removed by taking the radius of the fifth dimension ...
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What are Stephen Hawking's main contributions to research-level physics?

Without a doubt, Stephen Hawking is the most famous living scientist; indeed, his public visibility in all of history seems to be rivaled only by Einstein and easily eclipses giants of physics such as ...
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Should the answer to Einstein & Quantum gravity be found in conditions of our local observable universe? [duplicate]

It seems like the discourse over a unified Einstein and Quantum Gravity disregards the phenomena encountered in our local observable universe, such as we find throughout the Intergalactic Medium. One ...
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175 views

Gravity - Force or Result?

I am no Physicist, but I enjoy reading about Physics. However reading about leading theories such as M-Theory and others they speculate about the existence of the Graviton. In my past reading of ...
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Can anyone tell me what's this equation?

Can anyone tell me what's this equation?
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CFT calculation of the Partitionfunction of $2+1$ dimensional gravity

I want to reproduce formula (4.29) in http://arxiv.org/abs/0804.1773v1 given by: $$ Z=Tr(q^{L_{0}}\bar q^{\bar L_{0}})=|q|^{-2k} \prod^{\infty}_{n=2}\frac{1}{|1-q^{n}|^{2}} $$ Where the trace is ...
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What is the status of gauged gravity [duplicate]

The Standard Model of elementary particles is a gauge theory with gauge group $SU(3)\times SU(2)\times U(1)$, which is really a successful theory. We might be able to quantize gravity similarly. ...
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Does Newton's first law apply also to non-newtonian physics?

I think I understand than an example of Newton's first law (intertial frames) would be a single asteroid in vaccum with no other bodies around, a comet in such free space or likewise. Then I think the ...
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Form of Dilaton term in polarization tensor

The vertex operator associated with massless state is $$V(k,\epsilon) = -\frac{2}{\alpha}\epsilon_{\mu\nu}(k)\bar{\partial}X^\mu(\bar{z})\partial X^\nu(z)e^{ik\cdot X(z,\bar{z})}$$ The polarization ...
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306 views

A Conceptual Problem With the Field Equations of General Relativity

I have two questions: Suppose that we have an amount of energy in the form of a perfect fluid in the right hand side of Einstein field equations (energy momentum tensor), this will lead to a ...
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What is the P-parity, T-parity and C-parity of graviton? Are these conserved in general curved space-time?

I'm curious about the P,T,C-parity of graviton? 1)Are these graviton's parities even or odd? 2)Is the C,P,T-parity alternatively conserved in Einstein gravity? And does the CPT theorem still hold ...
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Bekenstein bound for electron?

Using the Wikipedia version of the Bekenstein bound, and substituting the Wikipedia values for electron mass and radius, one obtains 0.0662 bits. Does this really mean that a system, any system, ...
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117 views

Decoherence without time?

Decoherence is a phenomenon that provides a part of the explanation of why quantum systems and classical systems behave differently. What I understood from decoherence so far is that it requires ...
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48 views

Gravity of Light [duplicate]

I'm reading Quantum field theory in a Nutshell and I find a very interesting calculation that leads to the gravitational interaction between 2 light beam. Is this kind of interaction permitted in ...
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128 views

Dirac bracket and second class constraints in first-order gravity formalism

In the first order formulation of general relativity, the frame field $e_{\mu}^a$ and $\mathrm{SO}(3,1)$ spin connection $\omega_{\mu c}^b$ are independent variables. In the Hamiltonian formulation of ...
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Toy models of asymptotic safety?

Are there some toy model QFTs where the asymptotic safety scenario is realized?