Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

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Can quantum vacuum carry entropy?

So, we know that the state of quantum vacuum does carry energy, as it was measured in the Casimir effect. This energy comes from particles almost instantaneous creation and annihilation. Even if they ...
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235 views

Anomalously broken conformal symmetry

I'm trying to understand an argument made by Bardeen in On Naturalness in the Standard Model. The argument is about quadratic divergences in Standard Model. My notation is that the SM Higgs potential ...
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+50

Determine if Theory is Unitary from Lagrangian

Question: Given a quantum theory specified with a Lagrangian and the degrees of freedom to be varied, what is the procedure to determine if the theory is unitary or not? Concrete example to aid ...
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Why are non-Abelian gauge theories Lorentz invariant quantum mechanically?

I seem to be missing something regarding why Yang-Mills theories are Lorentz invariant quantum mechanically. Start by considering QED. If we just study the physics of a massless $U(1)$ gauge field ...
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43 views

what physical quantity do real scalar field operators create/destroy?

A complex scalar field $\phi(\vec{x}) \neq \phi^\dagger(\vec{x})$ destroys a particle at $\vec{x}$ and/or creates an antiparticle at $\vec{x}$. I could also say that $\phi(\vec{x})$ represents the ...
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75 views

When is quantum optics “correct”?

What is the regime under which we may consider quantum optics description of light a good approximation of a more correct theory such as QED? By quantum optics I mean describing the electromagnetic ...
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45 views

Quantizing highly nonlinear field-theories?

I'm wondering how to go about quantizing a classical field theory which looks nothing like a free field theory plus a perturbation term. Suppose for concreteness I have the classical hamiltonian $ ...
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3answers
515 views

Intuition for Path Integrals and How to Evaluate Them

I'm just starting to come across path integrals in quantum field theory, and want to get the right intuition for the them from the start. The amplitude for propagation from $x_a$ to $x_b$ is typically ...
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63 views

Anomalies in QFT books

Why in most QFT books when author discusses of non-invariance of measure of path integral (massless fermions interact with gauge fields) $$ \int D\bar{\Psi} D\Psi \to |\Psi \to U\Psi , \quad ...
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How to replace $T$-product with retarded commutator in LSZ formula?

I am reading Itzykson and Zuber's Quantum Field Theory book, and am unable to understand a step that is made on page 246: Here, they consider the elastic scattering of particle $A$ off particle $B$: ...
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1answer
41 views

Typical form of the beta function of the renormalization group

Why in "typical" cases (according to some non-English text I read), does the $\beta$-function have the form $$ \beta (g) = ag^{2} + bg^{3} + O(g^{4})\ ? $$ I.e., why are there no linear or logarithmic ...
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212 views

Time-ordered operator in Srednicki

On page 51 Srednicki states, "Note that the operators are in time order...we can insert $T$ without changing anything". This I agree with. But then on the next paragraph he states "The time order ...
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Complex integration by shifting the contour [migrated]

In section 12.11 of Jackson's Classical Electrodynamics, he evaluates an integral involved in the Green function solution to the 4-potential wave equation. Here it is: $\int_{-\infty}^\infty dk_0 ...
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73 views

Level quantization of 7d $SO(N)$ Chern-Simons action

In 3d, one can write down the $SO(N)$ Chern-Simons action to be $$S(A)=\frac{k}{192\pi}\int_{M}\text{Tr}(A d A +\frac{2}{3}A^3),$$ where $A$ is an $SO(N)$ connection. The level quantization can be ...
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Invisible stars due to finite photons [duplicate]

When we study black body radiation, we often make calculations assuming a continuum of radiation with some amount of flux. In reality, there is a very very large number of photons being emit per unit ...
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32 views

Mapping Issues with Unbounded Operators

Consider the operator-valued generalized function $\phi^{(k)}_{l}:=\phi^{(k)}_{l}$ on space-time $\mathcal{M}$. Now, smooth the operator-valued generalized function with test function $f(x)$ ...
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119 views

Nature of Fields in QFT

I'm not exactly an expert in quantum physics, but this seems to be a simple question, and I can't find an answer anywhere! There are specific types of fields used in physics: scalar fields (i.e. as ...
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35 views

How to derive the scale factor for special conformal transformation? [on hold]

By definition a conformal transformation of the coordinates is an invertible mapping $x\rightarrow x'$ which leaves the metric invariant upto a scale factor: \begin{equation} g_{\mu\nu}'(x') = ...
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1answer
97 views

Graph Theory and Feynman Integrals

In Vladimir A. Smirnov's book Analytic Tools for Feynman Integrals, Section 2.3, the alpha representation of general Feynman integral takes the form $$ F_{\Gamma}(q_1,\ldots,q_n;d) = ...
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89 views

Mathematical Prerequisites for QFT [closed]

I am curious about which areas of mathematics one should be comfortable with before learning QFT. I am familiar with the "learn-it-as-you-go" approach often advocated in physics, but would like to ...
2
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1answer
94 views

In QFT, why do fermions have to anticommute in order to insure causality?

I have seen this question and I believe I understand the answer to it. However, AFAIK, only for bosons the causality condition is a vanishing commutator. For fermions we expect the anticommutator ...
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72 views

An electron is an excitation of the electron field. So when we observe a higgs boson that means we've excited the higgs field?

See this related question: If particles are excitations what are their fields? I ask this question because, according to a lecture, the higgs boson was frozen into a "matrix" at some point before ...
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Which is more fundamental, Fields or Particles?

I hope that I am using appropriate terminology. My confusion about quantum theory (beyond my obvious unfamiliarity with its terminology) is basically twofold: I lack an adequate understanding of ...
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Ambiguous points in spontaneous symmetry breaking of discrete symmetry

For a discrete symmetry: At the minimum value of the potential, $V$, in the Lagrangian density, why do we take $\phi= \langle v\rangle + \eta$? Aren't we deliberately breaking the symmetry? If we ...
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1answer
58 views

Invariance under charge conjugation… Or not?

I have read some paper which says that the electroweak Lagrangian includes these terms like $\bar{\psi} \gamma_a\gamma_5\psi$ and $\bar{\psi} \gamma_a \psi$. They violate charge conjugation symmetry. ...
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1answer
67 views

How does string theory describe classical gravity theory, and QFT? [closed]

I am learning string theory, as I understand, gravitons exist as modes in string excitations, and also other particles. It gave me this picture: a lot of strings fulling in the spacetime, excitations ...
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Is it possible to create matter from space?

Like could maybe fluctuate the space some how and make the virtual paricles turn into normal matter
2
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1answer
58 views

Group theoretic way to find charges after SSB

I was wondering what is the group theoretic way to find the resulting charges of matter fields after a scalar field is given a vev. In the case of the EW symmetry breaking, one can directly read the ...
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1answer
67 views

change of variable in a 2-loop integral

given the 2 loop integral $$ \int dq_{1} \int dq_{2}F(q1,q2) $$ (1) then in dimension D=4 our integral will be a 8-dimensional integral so why can not make a change of variable to 8-dimensional ...
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2answers
297 views

Quantum to classical mapping: quantum criticality and path integral Monte Carlo

I'm trying to understand the connections between quantum models in d dimensions and classical models in (d+1) dimensions within two, possibly related, contexts: (i) in path integral monte carlo, the ...
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49 views

What's the value of the coupling constant in interacting field theories?

Consider this Lagrangian : $L = \frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu \Phi)^2 - \frac{M^2}{2}\Phi^2 +\frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu \phi)^2 -\frac{m^2}{2} \phi^2 -\mu\Phi\phi^2$ Its interaction term is given by : ...
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What equation describes the wavefunction of a single photon?

The Schrödinger equation describes the quantum mechanics of a single massive non-relativistic particle. The Dirac equation governs a single massive relativistic spin-½ particle. The photon is a ...
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1answer
65 views

Moduli spaces in string theory vs. soliton theory

In both string theory and soliton theory, moduli spaces are frequently used. As far as I known, for soliton theory, moduli spaces are something like collective coordinates for solitons, and for ...
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93 views

Lorentz symmetry and Noether's theorem

I'm trying to overcome some misunderstanding that I have in Noether's theorem. There is formula in David Gross's Lectures on QFT for Noether's theorem: ...
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1answer
30 views

Difference between Veneziano amplitude and Virasoro shapiro amplitude

I have been study about Veneziano amplitude and Virasoro Shapiro amplitude. I want to summarize this two amplitude in the following way, please check that i am understand them properly. Veneziano ...
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2answers
86 views

Does one really need classical physics in order to understand quantum physics? [closed]

I want to start studying quantum mechanics, and then move to quantum field theory. I have a strong mathematical background, and I think this aspect of quantum physics won't be a problem to me. Though, ...
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108 views

LHC data and mathematics of QFT

I'm reading Frederic's Paugam Towards the Mathematics of Quantum Field Theory, an advanced theoretical physics book. I would like to know how I could apply the theories in this book. For example, ...
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2answers
69 views

Converting two component product to four component notation

Consider the product of two left Weyl spinors in the notation commonly found in supersymmetry, \begin{equation} \chi ^\alpha\eta_\alpha = \chi ^\alpha \epsilon _{ \alpha \beta } \eta ^\beta ...
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60 views

Understanding the effective low-energy Lagrangian for hadrons

My course in Higgs Physics is discussing a two-nucleon low-energy effective theory of hadron interaction. With $\psi=(p,n)$, the pion is defined as $\vec{\pi}= i \bar{\psi}\vec{\tau} \gamma_5 ...
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1answer
128 views

S-Matrix and normalization of states

I'm trying to understand what is the S-matrix in QFT. People say that it has to be a unitary matrix, but that I guess will change with a different normalization of the incoming and outgoing states. My ...
3
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1answer
161 views

Fundamental representation in quantum field theory

In QFT we associate to each Gauge theory a continuous group of local transformations (a Gauge group), and then we require\define fermion fields to be irreducible representations belonging to the ...
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1answer
82 views

Why doesn't the photon have mass? The Higgs mechanism and pre-electroweak epoch

1) When electroweak separation occurred, 'why' wasn't the photon 'given' mass like the W and Z bosons? i.e why don't photos interact with the higg's field? 2a) How well is the higg's mechanism ...
2
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1answer
56 views

Scalar Particles, Flavor Changing Processes and Gauge Symmetries

Let's consider an extended version of the Standard Model (SM) with a new Yukawa operator of the form $$ \sum_\ell g_\ell\bar{\ell}\ell \phi ,$$ where $\ell$ is any lepton of the SM and $\phi$ is a new ...
3
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1answer
230 views

How to derive the form of the parity operator acting on Lorentz spinors?

I'm reading Berestetskii (Volume 4 of Landau & Lifshitz) section 19 on inversion of spinors. Berestetskii says parity $P$ maps undotted spinors into dotted spinors and vice-versa as ...
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2answers
72 views

What is the reason for the $ i \tau_2 $ - factor in the higgs coupling with up-type quarks?

The quark mass term in the Standard Model Lagrangian looks like this: $$ L = - \lambda_d \bar{Q}\phi d_R - \lambda_u \bar{Q} i \tau_2 \phi^* u_R $$ What is the reason for the $ i \tau_2 $ - ...
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1answer
117 views

Free Field theory to Interacting Field theory

Free field theory: Why is it said that different Fourier modes in case of a free field (say, real Klein-Gordon field) are independent of each other? Interacting field theory: How exactly does the ...
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Atomic Brownian Motion

Since atoms 'wiggle' proportionally to their energy level, I have two questions: Does it last 'forever'? Absolute Zero question And so, is this 'flux' a fundamental force? Then as an extra ...
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218 views

Gauge fermions versus gauge bosons

Why are all the interactions particle of a gauge theory bosons. Are fermionic gauge particle fields somehow forbidden by the theory ?
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46 views

Why does the state space contain states with negative norm and what would be an example?

My lecture script of Quantum Field Theory states that " the state space contains states with negative norm ". Why does it have to be like this and what would be an example fo such a state?