Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

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representation of conformal group in d>2

In P. Di Francesco, P. Mathieu, D. Snchal they fix the generators of the conformal group acting on a scalar field by somewhat arbitrarily defining $$\Phi'(x)=\Phi(x)-i\omega_a G_a\Phi(x)$$ and by ...
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1k views

Why helicity is proportional to the spin of particle and has two values?

How can it be shown without using the little group formalism? Let's have the Wigner's classification for the irreducible represetation of the Poincare group. For the massless case the eigenvalues of ...
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209 views

When is entanglement entropy the same as free energy?

I am given the feeling that there exists scenarios when this equality holds. Can anyone state/refer to the situations? One case that I hear of is that for $2+1$ CFTs the entanglement entropy ...
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157 views

Why is it hard to give a lattice definition of string theory?

In Polyakov's book, he explains that one possible way to compute the propagator for a point particle is to compute the lattice sum $\sum_{P_{x,x'}}\exp(-m_0L[P_{x,x'}])$, where the sum goes over all ...
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384 views

Obtaining supergravity from gauging global supersymmetry

On page 92, my still favorite supersymmetry book says, by making the global infinitisimal parameter of a SUSY tranformation spacetitime dependent (gauging) it forces one to introduce a new gauge field ...
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2k views

Graphene's Tight Binding Hamiltonian

Graphene has two atoms in its primitive unit cell. This makes it intuitive to see that the tight binding Hamiltonian can be constructed as a $ 2 \times 2 $ matrix $H$ acting on a spinor $S$ that ...
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1k views

The Chern-Simons/WZW correspondence

Can someone tell me a reference which proves this? - as to how does the bulk partition function of Chern-Simons' theory get completely determined by the WZW theory (its conformal blocks) on its ...
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237 views

States versus ensembles in quantum mechanics

In quantum mechanics, we talk about (1) vectors, (2) states, and (3) ensembles (e.g., a beam in a particle accelerator). Suppose we want to translate this into mathematical definitions. If I'd never ...
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Why do we say that irreducible representation of Poincare group represents the one-particle state?

Only because Rep is unitary, so saves positive-definite norm (for possibility density), Casimir operators of the group have eigenvalues $m^{2}$ and $m^2s(s + 1)$, so characterizes mass and spin, and ...
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445 views

Deriving entanglement entropy from Renyi entropy

My questions are based on this paper - http://arxiv.org/abs/0905.4013 Firstly I want to know as to whether some assumptions are needed about the relationship between the systems $A$ and $B$ for the ...
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1answer
835 views

Energy-Momentum Tensor in Conformal Field Theory

Basically, I would really like it if somebody just explained to me what is going on here. Please use any physics lingo you feel is necessary, but explain what you mean. I am just having trouble ...
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Why do we expect our theories to be independent of cutoffs?

Final edit: I think I pretty much understand now (touch wood)! But there's one thing I don't get. What's the physical reason for expecting the correlation functions to be independent of the cutoff? I....
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856 views

Running of gauge couplings in the Standard Model [closed]

I'm sure many of us are familiar with the following plot showing the running of the inverse of the fine-structure constants of the SM. (I got the picture from google) At one-loop, the expressions ...
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745 views

Symmetry factor of a second order four point function term of the $\phi^4$ theory

I am reading Cheng and Li. On page 9, it is written that the coefficient $\frac{1}{2 \cdot (4!)^2}$ for the second order term of the four point function becomes just $\frac{1}{2}$ for the following ...
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439 views

Lorentz group and classification of fields by their transformation under Lorentz transformations

Let's have Lorentz group with generators of 3-rotations, $\hat {R}_{i}$, and Lorentz boosts, $\hat {L}_{i}$. By introducing operators $\hat {J}_{i} = \frac{1}{2}\left(\hat {R}_{i} + i\hat {L}_{i}\...
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305 views

Photon mass and life time

In this article, the author tried to explain that, Einstein's theory may not valid because he says "photon can decay because it may have minute amount of mass". I'm totally in a conundrum state that ...
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767 views

Charge Renormalization and Photon Propagator

I'm trying to understand charge renormalization in QED. I know that one can write the full photon propagator as $$\frac{-i\eta_{\mu\nu}}{q^2(1-\Pi(q^2))}$$ where $\Pi$ is regular at $0$. Obviously ...
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365 views

Field Strength Renormalisation in Peskin and Schroeder

In chapter 7 of Peskin and Schroeder they define the field strength renormalisation $Z$ for a quantum field to be the residue of the Fourier transform of the correlation function $$\langle \Omega | \...
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507 views

How do fermion and scalar masses run with energy? Is the difference in their running the core of the hierarchy problem?

Do fermion and scalar running masses run in the same way? Specifically, what are the qualitative differences in the mass beta functions for, say, scalar $\lambda\phi^4$ field theory and the fermion ...
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155 views

Adiabatic quantum evolution of single photon or biphoton system

The prerequisite for adiabatic quantum evolution of single photon or biphoton system is as follows. We have to prepare a single photon or biphoton quantum system which has a ground and a higher level ...
5
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2answers
466 views

Higgs vs phonons

Jim Baggott's "Higgs" quotes David Millers' prize-winning one-page explanation of the Higgs mechanism (the one that evokes Margaret Thatcher crossing a room). I've heard that part many times, but not ...
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485 views

How are low energy effective actions derived in string theory?

For example the eq 2.1 here with regards to Type IIB. Unless I am terribly missing/misreading something Polchinski doesn't ever seem to derive these low energy supergravity actions. I would like to ...
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102 views

3d Ising Fixed point on general space manifold?

The headline question: Is it known how to construct an equivalent of the 3-D Ising Fixed point theory on an arbitrary 3-D manifold? Or any non-trivial d > 2 fixed point? The answer is maybe as simple ...
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705 views

What led to the electroweak and strong forces splitting?

Is the reason for the split believed to be spontaneous symmetry breaking? If so, did SSB occur because the Universe was cooling rapidly from extremely high temperatures?
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1answer
145 views

Are scalar fields invariant under unitary operators?

Is this correct? Are scalar fields defined as being invariant under $U^{\dagger}U$ transformations? If so, is this transformation also called the trivial transformation? Thanks for any help or ...
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161 views

Can an observer be the observed?

As a supplement to this question as to whether particles can be observers, supposing that the answer is yes. One could suppose a setup where particle A is observing particle B, but what to stop us ...
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Do commutation relations exist between superfields?

To quantize a theory, Klein gordon field for example, commutation relations are stablished. Or anticommuting ones in the fermionic case. If I have the Wess.Zumino model or the free model: $$S~=~\int\...
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285 views

Renormalization, symmetries and freedom to choose counterterms

I am considering the perturbative renormalization of a simple non-phenomenological QFT with Lagrangian ${\cal L}$ (for scalar fields with multiple generations). I understand that I can renormalize it, ...
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3answers
1k views

Connection between $\Delta x \Delta p \geq \frac{\hbar}{2}$ and $\Delta E \Delta t \geq \frac{\hbar}{2}$

Is there a way to derive second equation from the first one? I mean is there a connection between those two uncertainty relations? \begin{align} \Delta x \Delta p &\geq \frac{\hbar}{2}\\ \Delta ...
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325 views

Can classical systems exhibit “strong coupling”?

Does the concept of strong coupling mean anything in a classical setting? If strong coupling means just an inability to apply perturbative methods to the Hamiltonian, then obviously yes, we can ...
6
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1answer
762 views

energy momentum tensor and covariant derivative

In field theory, the energy momentum defined as the functional derivative wrt the metric $T_{\mu\nu}=\frac{2}{\sqrt{-g}}\frac{\delta S}{\delta g^{\mu\nu}}$ (up to a sign depending on conventions)...
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2answers
494 views

Second Quantization - Texts

I am trying to familiarize myself with the ideas of Second Quantization. However, the literature that I can find online seems only to outline the tools of this formalism of quantum mechanics. There ...
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168 views

Lorentz homogeneous group and observables

For generators of the Lorentz group we have the following algebra: $$ [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {R}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat {R}_{k}, \quad [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {L}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat {L}_{...
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chirality oscillations in weak interaction

As far as I have understood, the mass $m$ of a fermion causes a coupling of the both chiralities $\psi_L$ and $\psi_R$. This coupling would induce an oscillation of the chirality within a time scale ...
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95 views

Baryogenesis - P and CP Violation

There are 4 requirements for baryogenesis to happen: 1. A process that violates baryonnumber conservation 2. The universe has to be out of equilibrium 3. P has to be violated 4. CP has to be violated ...
12
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1answer
304 views

Why do we only have complete particle generations?

There are 3 generations of fermions in the standard model. I know that there is a theorem that states, that only complete generations are allowed. This means that there have to be quarks with three ...
0
votes
1answer
155 views

beta decay equation balance

Quark doesn't constitutes more fundamental particle and proton and neutron consist of quarks. Now come to beta decay. $n \rightarrow p + e^{-} + \bar{\nu}_e $ How can an electron emit from ...
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1answer
169 views

Mathematical explanation of why Higgs has a vev

If Higgs ($\phi$) is a complex doublet: $ \phi_{1}+i\phi_{2}$ $\phi_{3}+i\phi_{4}$ how do I show that $\phi_3$ has a vev but the others do not? $V(\phi)=\mu^{2}(\phi^{\dagger}\phi)+\lambda(\phi^{\...
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0answers
366 views

How does spin appear in QFT?

In QFT, as I read, it appears naturally. It is connected with Poincare algebra, doesn't it? __ As explanation of the main part of the question. Operator of relativistic orbital angular momentum 4-...
4
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1answer
256 views

Full calculation of B meson mixing amplitude

I am trying to calculate B mixing in the Standard Model (in preparation to go beyond the SM). I have no trouble doing the gamma matrix algebra etc. but the loop integral keeps tripping me up. In my ...
6
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1answer
478 views

What exactly is the connection between gauge transformations and symmetry groups?

For a given gauge transformation, say, the electromagnetic field, where observable quantities aren't affected by transformations of the form $$\mathbf{A}' = \mathbf{A} + \nabla \chi,$$ $$\phi' = \phi -...
9
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1answer
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Gauge fixing and degrees of freedom

Today, my friend (@Will) posed a very intriguing question - Consider a complex scalar field theory with a $U(1)$ gauge field $(A_\mu, \phi, \phi^*)$. The idea of gauge freedom is that two solutions ...
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444 views

Black magic “Hartree” approximation

The question is about an unusual looking version of the Hartree or mean field approximation. The context is several papers I've been reading recently about the out of equilibrium dynamics of phase ...
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1answer
193 views

minimizing the Higgs potential equivalent to finding the minimum?

When my advisor tells me to "minimize the Higgs potential", is she asking me to find the minimum (take the derivative of the potential and set it equal to zero)?
8
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1answer
274 views

What is the relation between the representation the Higgs field transforms under, the types of couplings in the theory and Higgs/Coulomb branches?

When reading about Higgs and Coulomb 'phases' I came across two separate definitions: The first tells us that the Higgs/Coulomb phases are determined by the representation that the Higgs field ...
16
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2answers
3k views

Time ordering and time derivative in path integral formalism and operator formalism

In operator formalism, for example a 2-point time-ordered Green's function is defined as $\langle\mathcal{T}\phi(x_1)\phi(x_2)\rangle_{op}=\theta(x_1-x_2)\phi(x_1)\phi(x_2)+\theta(x_2-x_1)\phi(x_2)\...
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206 views

Path integral measure and symmetry

For a generic field theory the path integral measure is defined as, \begin{equation} \mathcal{D}\Phi = \prod_i d\Phi(x_i), \end{equation} where $\Phi$ is a generic field (i.e. it may be scalar, ...
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Is the electromagnetic force responsible for contact forces? [duplicate]

It is commonly stated that there are four fundamental forces, or interactions, in nature. It is natural to consider which of those is responsible for the normal force we meet in elementary physics. ...
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400 views

Etymology of “Renormalisation”

Just out of curiosity, does anyone know why "renormalisation" is so named? Who first came up with the term, and why was it used? I did a mathematics undergraduate so to me "normalisation" means ...
4
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1answer
491 views

What determines the spin of fields in gauge field theories?

I understand that gauge bosons transform as the adjoint of their respective symmetry groups, but what determines the spin of the field? Can you have some gauge group where the adjoint is spin zero?