Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

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SUSY and the Large hadron collider

Did the LHC rule out SUSY as a solution to the hierarchy problem ? What's the common belief among theorists regarding the possibility of discovering SUSY in the 2015 run of the LHC ? Did the absence ...
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1answer
78 views

Life time of a wave

Let us consider, we have guessed a potential for a wave like non linear, which is propagating through space. We guess a Lagrangian for the wave $$L= \int r^{d-1} dr \left[\frac{1}{2}\dot \phi^2 ...
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603 views

Unitary spacetime translation operator

Srednicki writes: We can make this a little fancier by defining the unitary spacetime translation operator $$ T(a) \equiv \exp(-iP^\mu a_\mu/ \hbar) $$ Then we have $$ T(a)^{-1} \phi(x) T(a) = ...
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1answer
132 views

Formulation of the uncertainty principle for a system?

There is a biological system that I can indeed describe by a simple quantum Hamiltonian $H$ having eigenstates $|q\rangle$ labelled by the numbers $q$, and having energies proportional to $f(q)$ - ...
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157 views

What is the physical meaning of equivalence of 1st and 2nd quantization formalism?

Ref (Superstring theory (Green, Schwarz, Witten)) Take an $n$ dimensional euclidean space-time $x_0,x_1...x_{n -1}$, a relativist real scalar field, with a propagator $G_E(x,y)$. The propagator ...
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123 views

Can a hierarchy of fixed points potentially be used to describe a kinetic energy spectrum which is composed of multiple scale invariant subranges?

Making use of a nonequilibrium functional renormalization group (Berges and Mesterhazy, 2012) are able to investigate a whole hierarchy of fixed points that explain the successive evolution of a ...
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596 views

Renormalization is a Tool for Removing Infinities or a Tool for Obtaining Physical Results?

Quoting Wikipedia: renormalization is any of a collection of techniques used to treat infinities arising in calculated quantities. Is that true? to me, it seems better to define ...
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1answer
165 views

Finding out Energy value

A Lagrangian is given by, $$L= \left(\frac{\pi}{2}\right)^2 R^d \left[\frac{1}{2}\dot A^2 - V(A_{max})\right]$$ $$E=\left(\frac{\pi}{2}\right)^2R^d V(A_{max}) $$ where V (A) now includes nonlinear ...
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622 views

Quantum to classical mapping: quantum criticality and path integral Monte Carlo

I'm trying to understand the connections between quantum models in d dimensions and classical models in (d+1) dimensions within two, possibly related, contexts: (i) in path integral monte carlo, the ...
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3answers
1k views

Spontaneous symmetry breaking in classical mechanics, quantum mechanics and quantum field theory

I wondered if someone could help me understand spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) in classical mechanics, quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. Consider a Higgs-like potential, with a local ...
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1answer
308 views

How can “quantum particles have positive masses, even though the classical waves travel at the speed of light”?

Clay Mathematics Institute writes about the Yang-Mills and mass gap problem on this page http://www.claymath.org/millennium/Yang-Mills_Theory/: The successful use of Yang-Mills theory to describe ...
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148 views

The interaction picture doesn't exist? [duplicate]

I have recently encountered Haag's theorem and according to Wikipedia: Rudolf Haag postulated [1] that the interaction picture does not exist in an interacting, relativistic quantum field theory ...
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1answer
194 views

How to justify matter-field interaction for non-gauge-invariant Hamiltonian?

I'm wondering how can one formally justify the electromagnetic response of a system which does not verify local U(1) gauge invariance. A good example of what I would like to consider is given by the ...
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1answer
275 views

The unitary time-evolution in the interation picture

I'm currently consuming a course on QFT where we need to define the unitary time-evolution to get the time evolution of the wave function in the interaction picture: $\hat{U}(t_1,t_0) = ...
4
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1answer
437 views

What is on the AdS side in AdS/CFT supergravity or string theory?

What really is on the AdS side in AdS/CFT, does it always have to be string theory or is sometimes supergravity "enough" or better suited to do calculations? From the answers to my earlier question, ...
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3answers
431 views

Fundamentals of Quantum Electrodynamics

In quantum electrodynamics, the classical Hamiltonian is obtained from the classical electromagnetic Lagrangian. Then the classical electric and magnetic fields are promoted to operators, as is the ...
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2answers
4k views

Virtual photons, what makes them virtual?

The wikipedia page "Force Carrier" says: The electromagnetic force can be described by the exchange of virtual photons. The virtual photon thing baffles me a little. I get that virtual particles ...
4
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1answer
302 views

Does the Renormalization of QFT Contradict Canonical Quantization?

Does the renormalization of QFT contradict canonical quantization? In canonical quantization, you take the classical fields and canonical momenta and turn them into operators, and you require that ...
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0answers
191 views

IR divergence and renormalization scale in dimensional regularization (part 2)

This is in continuation of my previous question, IR divergence and renormalization scale in dimensional regularization. Lubos gave a nice answer there but I want to get to a very specific example ...
5
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1answer
437 views

Forbidden trajectories in path integrals

In Feynman's path integral formulation we add all the possible trajectories of a particle to get the probability amplitude. What are forbidden trajectories? Not differentiable? Is this related to ...
2
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2answers
193 views

Uncertainty in path integral formulation

In Feynman's path integral formulation, in order to calculate the probability amplitude, we sum up all the possible trajectories of the particle between the points $A$ and $B$. Since we know ...
11
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2answers
1k views

Why do neutrinos propagate in a mass eigenstate?

I am aware that flavor $\neq$ mass eigenstate, which is how mixing happens, but whenever someone talks about neutrino oscillations they tend to state without motivation that when neutrinos are ...
4
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1answer
956 views

What is the formal definition of spin-independent vs. spin-dependent scattering?

In the search for WIMPs as the dark matter particle, there is an important distinction between spin-independent and spin-dependent scattering. Roughly, WIMPs scattering from nucleons through a ...
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1answer
331 views

Can massive fermions have zero modes?

I'm confused about fermion zero modes in relation to instantons. I understand that instantons can create fermion zero modes, but it's not clear to me when a fermion has a zero mode. For example, ...
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1answer
1k views

Dimensional regularization: removing more than just logarithmic divergencies?

I have followed two courses on QFT, which both involved renormalization by dimensional regularization. My confusion is that one of the professors claimed that dimensional regularization can only be ...
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0answers
179 views

Holographic Field Theory

I am trying to read this paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1780 and I don't understand how to get from eqn 91 which is, $$S_{2} = N^{2} \{V[P^{(1)}_{m}] + (J^{(1)m} - \mathcal{J}^{m})P_{m}^{(1)}\} ...
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1answer
98 views

Must string models that describe 4d effective field theories always have D-branes that extend in the 4 non-compact spacetime dimensions?

In string theory the D-branes give those directions that the strings are allowed to move along. The string excitations give the fields that we detect. Is it correct to think of a particle propagating ...
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2answers
729 views

Imposing anti-commutation relations on fermionic quasi-particles

In many theories of CMT, we assume the nature of quasi-particles (without giving proper justifications). For example, we assume nature of quasi-particles to be fermionic in case of a interacting ...
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1answer
491 views

Solving Klein-Gordon equation in the Rindler coordinates - the Unruh effect

I am reading 't Hooft's notes on Black Holes. I want to find the solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation $(\tilde{x},\tilde{y}, \rho, \tau)$ in the Rindler coordinates which are $$x=\tilde{x}\,\,\,\,\ ...
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2answers
406 views

Diffeomorphism invariant Quantum field theories

In QFT , The action should be invariant under poincare symmetry $g_{\mu\rho}(x)=g_{\mu\rho}^{\prime}(x^\prime)$ . We can generalize this by considering theories invariant under conformal symmetry ...
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1answer
247 views

QFT in curvilinear coordinates

I have a question that I believe is confusing me more than it should. We all know the path integral in the usual $(t,\vec{x})$ coordinates. For example, consider a simple $U(1)$ gauge theory. The ...
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1answer
705 views

Conservation of Energy and Quantum Fluctuations

Regarding conservation of mass-energy Wikipedia says: "this is an exact law, or more precisely, has never been shown to be violated." However, regarding quantum fluctuations, Wikipedia says here: ...
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1answer
2k views

IR divergence and renormalization scale in dimensional regularization

Is it possible that if a certain (loop) integral is IR divergent then that will have effect on the dimensionally regularized answer for that? (..does the epsilon expansion see the IR divergence in ...
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0answers
415 views

Toward the establishment of non-equilibrium (quasi-equilibrium) magnon BEC theory

In 2006, Demokritov et al have reported that they have achieved the observation of quasi-equilibrium magnon Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in YIG at finite (room) temperature by using the method ...
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6answers
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Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?

Lamb 1969 states, A misconception which most physicists acquire in their formative years is that the photoelectric effect requires the quantization of the electromagnetic field for its ...
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1answer
961 views

Formula for Symmetry Factor

In $\phi^3$ theory, are there any formula for determining the Symmetry factor as that is found for the $\phi^4$ theory in any standard book of Quantum Field Theory?
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2answers
474 views

On the Axial Anomaly

I know that if we start with a massive theory, the chiral states $L$ and $R$ remain coupled to each other in the massless limit. Because a charged Dirac particle of a given helicity can make a ...
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1answer
423 views

N=1 v N=2 supermultiplets

I read that the chiral nature of SM fields is an indication that they must be realized in a N=1 supermultiplet (and not N=2). I don't quite understand how so. Please enlighten.
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1answer
395 views

Gauge symmetries and elementary particles

The Weinberg-Witten theorem (disclaimer: I don't know this wikipedia entry) is usually mentioned as the reason why gravitons may not be composite particles. I do understand the proof of the theorem, ...
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1answer
120 views

partition function for Wightman and Haag-Kastler QFT

From what I hear, some modern mathematical approach quantum field theory uses the following definition "A $d$-dimensional $S$-structured quantum field theory $Q$ is a mathematical object, ...
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1answer
251 views

Relation between symmetry factors

In $\phi^3$ theory, the generating functional for interacting field theory is given by: $$ Z_1(J) = \sum_{V=0}^{\infty} \frac{1}{V!} \Big[ \frac{iZ_g g}{6} \int \Big( \frac{1}{i}\frac{\delta}{\delta ...
4
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1answer
743 views

Is the number-phase uncertainty relation classical?

For a harmonic oscillator in one dimension, there is an uncertainty relation between the number of quanta $n$ and the phase of the oscillation $\phi$. There are all kinds of technical complications ...
7
votes
1answer
554 views

What does it mean to renormalize an effective field theory?

This is in reference to slide 19 of this talk "As always in Effective Field Theory, the theory becomes predictive when there are more observables than parameters" Can one explain what this exactly ...
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2answers
2k views

Gauge fields — why are they traceless hermitian?

A gauge field is introduced in the theory to preserve local gauge invariance. And this field (matrix) is expanded in terms of the generators, which is possible because the gauge field is traceless ...
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4answers
628 views

Terms allowed in Lagrangian density [duplicate]

I never fully understood why the Lagrangian density (let's say for a scalar field) was restricted to have only first order derivatives of the field in time and space in QFT. One reason I can think of ...
12
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2answers
1k views

Spin - where does it come from?

I study physics and am attending a course on quantum field theory. It is hard for me to draw connections from there to the old conventional theories. In quantum field theory spin originates from the ...
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1answer
265 views

Is broken supersymmetry compatible with a small cosmological constant?

I understand that we can find the energy of a bosonic field in its vacuum state via $E_{vac}^{(B)} = \sum_{\vec{k},s} \frac{1}{2}\hbar\omega_{\vec{k},s}^{(B)}$ and a fermionic one similarly, ...
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1answer
613 views

Most general Feynman diagram

What is the most general Feynman diagram? Srednicki, in his QFT book, says: The most general diagram consists of a product of several connected diagrams. Let $C_I$ stand for a particular connected ...
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5answers
4k views

Nothing vs. empty space

This question quotes Hawking saying: [...] you enter a world where conjuring something out of nothing is possible (at least, for a short while). That's because at this scale particles, such as ...
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Are quantum fluctuations completely uncaused events?

I read here that particles/antiparticles appear and annihilate each other spontaneously in empty space. Since particles appear and disappear in empty space, it would seem that empty space has some ...