Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it possible that the Big Bang was caused by virtual particle creation?

As far as I understand, it is understood that throughout the universe there exists, what is known as, a quantum field from which, due to its fluctuations, temporary (pairs of) virtual particles ...
0
votes
2answers
340 views

Harmonic oscillator and Lorentz symmetry

There is a analog between harmonic oscillator $x=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2\omega}}(a+a^\dagger)$ and quantum field $\phi=\int dp^3\frac{1}{(2\pi)^3}\frac{1}{\sqrt{2\omega_p}}(a_p e^{ipx}+a^\dagger e^{-ipx})$, ...
1
vote
0answers
120 views

Does the attached “poster” work as a hook into the arXiv paper cited, “Nonlinear Wightman fields”? [closed]

"Nonlinear Wightman fields" are my current response to a wish to do interacting quantum field theory differently, no matter how successful what we currently do may be. The following image of a single ...
5
votes
1answer
697 views

Spontaneous symmetry breaking in SU(5) GUT?

At the end of this video lecture about grand unified theories, Prof. Susskind explains that there should be some kind of an additional Higgs mechanism at work, to break the symmetry between the ...
5
votes
0answers
431 views

Gaussian Integrals : Functional determinant expressed as a trace

Be $A_{ij}$ a symmetric matrix. Then I can easily write $$ \int \exp\left(-\frac{1}{2}\sum_{i,j}x_i A_{ij} x_j+\sum_{i} B_i x_i\right)\; d^nx= \sqrt{(2\pi)^n}\exp\left\{-\frac{1}{2}\mathrm{Tr}\log ...
27
votes
8answers
4k views

Is the wave-particle duality a real duality?

I often hear about the wave-particle duality, and how particles exhibit properties of both particles and waves. I most recently heard this in this video. However, I wonder; is this actually a duality? ...
5
votes
1answer
390 views

Higher dimension operator in free Dirac Lagrangian

When discussing higher dimensional operators in a theory with fermions, why do I never see anyone ever talk about the dimension five operator $\partial_\mu\bar\psi\partial^\mu\psi$? How does the ...
8
votes
2answers
504 views

Wavefunction collapse and gravity

If gravity can be thought of as both a wave (the gravitational wave, as predicted to exist by Albert Einstein and certain calculations) and a particle (the graviton), would it make sense to apply ...
2
votes
1answer
260 views

Tachyon vertex operator (Polchinski's book)

I would like to know how does Polchinski in his book "derive" what is the "tachyon vertex operator" (..as say stated in equation 3.6.25, 6.2.11..) I can't locate a "derivation" of the fact that ...
6
votes
1answer
289 views

Are the Møller wave operators $\Omega_\pm$ related to $\lim_{t\rightarrow\infty}U(t)$ from field theory?

When we want to compute correlation functions $\langle\Omega|\,T\hat{\phi}(x_1)\ldots|\Omega\rangle$ in an interacting quantum field theory, we relate it to the free-field objects $|0\rangle$ and ...
11
votes
3answers
1k views

Evaluating propagator without the epsilon trick

Consider the Klein–Gordon equation and its propagator: $$G(x,y) = \frac{1}{(2\pi)^4}\int d^4 p \frac{e^{-i p.(x-y)}}{p^2 - m^2} \; .$$ I'd like to see a method of evaluating explicit form of $G$ ...
2
votes
4answers
682 views

Why the Hamiltonian and the Lagrangian are used interchangeably in QFT perturbation calculations

Whenever one needs to calculate correlation functions in QFT using perturbations one encounters the following expression: $\langle 0| some\ operators \times \exp(iS_{(t)}) |0\rangle$ where, ...
2
votes
1answer
179 views

Other Gross-Neveu like theories?

By "Gross-Neveu like" I mean non-supersymmetric QFTs whose partition function/beta-function (or any n-point function) is somehow exactly solvable in the large $N_c$ or $N_f$ or 't Hooft limit. ...
11
votes
4answers
648 views

Why do we study the scalar field in QFT when there is no such thing in nature?

The Klein-Gordan equation describing a spinless scalar field is one of the first things one studies in a QFT course, but there are no elementary spin-0 fields in nature. Is the scalar field to QFT ...
2
votes
1answer
349 views

Is proper time renormalization gauge invariant?

Proper Time Renormalization is achieved by putting: $$ \int_0^\infty e^{iat} dt = {1\over ia} $$ Is it true that this is the only kind of normalization that is gauge invariant? If so, why do famous ...
14
votes
1answer
704 views

Multi-loop beta function of gauge theory (*without* Feynman diagrams)

I would like to point to the beautiful section 4.3 (page 42) of these lecture notes. I think this is the most educative exposition I have ever seen anywhere about Yang-Mill's beta function. What I ...
2
votes
0answers
268 views

Question on the Gell-Mann Low equation

Question on the Gell-Mann Low Equation. In this paper, http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3365, page 21, the author argues that if: t →∞(1-iϵ), all the terms in equation (193) goes to zero, except the first ...
2
votes
3answers
769 views

Scalar Field Redefinition and Scattering Amplitude

Consider a field redefinition $$ \phi \rightarrow \phi' = \phi+\lambda \phi^2 $$ Find the Feynman rules for this theory and work out the $2\rightarrow 2$ scattering amplitude at tree level (The result ...
2
votes
1answer
210 views

Relationship between local and global scaling (Weyl) symmetry

Theorem 5.1 on page 80 of this paper says that Assuming that the matter fields satisfy their equations of motion, the matter field action is locally Weyl invariant if and only if the corresponding ...
1
vote
2answers
651 views

What is the expectation value of the number operator when the vacuum has a VEV?

The number operator N applied to a field whose vacuum has zero VEV gives $N|0>=0$. What if we apply it to the Higgs field? The background of this question is that in popular scientific accounts, ...
6
votes
0answers
147 views

Gauge-invariance of pole mass using Ward Identity

I am able to explicitly verify to one-loop order that pole masses are independent of the choice of gauge paramter. But how do I use the Ward-Identity/Taylor-Slavnov identity show that the position of ...
2
votes
1answer
112 views

A problem with supersymmetry transformation invariance

Consider the following transformation of the integration measure $dX d\psi_1 d\psi_2$: where $\psi_1$ $\psi_2$,$\varepsilon^1$, and $\varepsilon^2$ are Grassman variables. $\delta_\varepsilon X= ...
14
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the physical interpretation of the S-matrix in QFT?

A few closely related questions regarding the physical interpretation of the S-matrix in QFT: I am interested in both heuristic and mathematically precise answers. Given a quantum field theory when ...
11
votes
1answer
301 views

Hawking Radiation as Tunneling

Firstly, I'm aware that Hawking radiation can be derived in the "normal" way using the Bogoliubov transformation. However, I was intrigued by the heuristic explanation in terms of tunneling. The ...
1
vote
2answers
259 views

A step in the derivation of the magnetic moment of the electron in Zee's QFT book

In chapter III.6 of his Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell, A. Zee sets out to derive the magnetic moment of an electron in quantum electrodynamics. He starts by replacing in the Dirac equation the ...
0
votes
1answer
206 views

About interchange phase of identical particles in Weinberg's QFT book

In Weinberg's textbook on QFT(google book preview), he discussed the phase acquired after interchanging particle labels in the last paragraph of page 171 and the footnote of page 172. It seems he's ...
1
vote
2answers
497 views

Proca equation question

i'm having trouble understanding the Proca equation $$(g_{\mu\nu}(\Box+\mu^2)-\partial_{\mu}\partial_{\nu})\varphi^{\nu}=0$$ where $g_{\mu\nu}$ is the metric and $\mu$ is a parameter. Where is the ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

What does Friedrichs mean by “Myriotic fields”?

I came across K. O. Friedrichs' very old book (1953) "Mathematical Apsects of the Quantum Theory of Fields", and hardly any of it makes sense to me. One of the strange things that he refers to are ...
3
votes
0answers
130 views

Regulating the sum in Casimir Force

I am trying to evaluate the Casimir force using a Gaussian regulator (I know there are other much easier ways to do this, but I want to try this!) We then are reduced to evaluating the sum $$ ...
1
vote
0answers
95 views

Translate a two dimensional classical Dirac theory to a (1+1)-dim quantum theory

Suppose I have a two dimensional classical Dirac Hamiltonian with $\Psi=(\psi_1,\psi_2)^T$: $$ H=\int \mathrm{d}x \mathrm{d}y \Psi^\dagger(\sigma^x i\partial_x+\sigma^y i\partial_y+m\sigma^z)\Psi. $$ ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

The analogy between temperature and imaginary time

There are many statements about the relation between time and temperature in statistical physics and quantum field theory, the basic idea is to interpret (inverse) temperature in statistics as "time" ...
2
votes
1answer
199 views

Glueball mass in non-abelian Yang Mills theory

How can the glueball mass be calculated in Yang Mills theory?
4
votes
1answer
179 views

Why Must Conserved Currents of Lorentz Symmetry Satisfy the Lorentz Algebra

I've seen it written many times that the commutation relation $[M^{I-},M^{J-}]=0$ is required for Lorentz invariance in the light cone gauge quantisation of the bosonic string. This follows ...
3
votes
1answer
221 views

Inner product of particle-anti-particle spinor components

Suppose I have four-component spinors $\Psi$ and $\bar \Psi$ satisfying the Dirac equation with $$\Psi(\vec x) = \int \frac{\textrm{d}^3 p}{(2\pi)^3} \frac{1}{\sqrt{2 E_{\vec p}}} \sum_{s = \pm ...
4
votes
2answers
431 views

How do I define time-ordering for Wightman functions?

This is a follow-up question to What are Wightman fields/functions Ok, so based on my reading, the field operators of a theory are understood to be operator-valued distributions, that is, to be ...
6
votes
2answers
228 views

Interacting representation of the Poincaré group

In his QFT book, Weinberg claims what follows (Vol I, pag. 144-145): given a (free) representation of the Poincaré group with generators $\bf P$ (spatial translations), $H_0$ (time translations), $\bf ...
4
votes
1answer
280 views

Unstable particles and quantum field theory

I am searching for not too old literature on the quantum description of unstable particles. I am referring to something beyond the ad-hoc S-matrix description based on the optical theorem common to ...
0
votes
2answers
713 views

Applications of QFT in theoretical physics

I would like to know which fields in physics have seen growth or benefited by applying QFT? I know that approaches to quantum gravity such as string theory use QFT, HEP and also some branches of ...
3
votes
2answers
174 views

How does relativity lead to multi particles in Dirac and QFT, exactly

I have asked this question before on other forums, but only got the classical answer of the impossibility of the probability interpretation for single particle in QFT. Now, there seems to be also ...
7
votes
1answer
259 views

alternatives to supersymmetry and Coleman-Mandule theorem

Humour me for a minute here and let's imagine that all interesting and plausible supersymmetry models have been "cornered" out by the experimental data; what sort of alternatives are there for having ...
6
votes
1answer
657 views

Faddeev-Popov ghost propagator in canonical quantization

Obtaining the propagator for the Faddeev-Popov (FP) ghosts from the path integral language is straightforward. It is simply $$\langle T(c(x) \bar c(y))\rangle~=~\int\frac{d^4 p}{(2\pi)^4}\frac{i ...
3
votes
1answer
172 views

Poincaré group on quantum Klein-Gordon field (C*-algebraic scenario)

on the same topic as this question, I have been trying to fool around with the free real K-G field in flat spacetime on the C*-algebraic scenario (Haag-Kastler axioms, Weyl quantization, etc). Since ...
1
vote
0answers
623 views

Why is the axial current said to create particles?

In Peskin and Schroeder p. 669 it is argued that the axial current can be parametrized between the vacuum and an on-shell pion state as: $$<0|j^{\mu 5}(x)|\pi^b(p)>=-ip^\mu f_\pi ...
15
votes
1answer
1k views

Interpretation of derivative interaction term in QFT

I am trying to understand what a term like $$ \mathcal{L}_{int} = (\partial^{\mu}A )^2 B^2 $$ with $A$ and $B$ being scalar fields for instance means. I understand how to draw an interaction term in ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the relativistic particle in a box?

I know people try to solve Dirac equation in a box. Some claim it cannot be done. Some claim that they had found the solution, I have seen three and they are all different and bizarre. But my main ...
3
votes
2answers
205 views

Many faces of linear response theory

I have seen two forms of linear response: One is in the calculation of susceptibilities using Green functions. The other is in the evaluation of response currents, say, London current of a ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What are Wightman fields/functions

Simple question: What are Wightman fields? What are Wightman functions? What are their uses? For example can I use them in operator product expansions? How about in scattering theory?
4
votes
2answers
401 views

What is the exact relationship between scale invariance and renormalizability of a theory?

I have often read that renormalizability and scale invariance are somehow related. For example in this tutorial on page 12 in the first sentence of point (7), self similarity (= scale invariance ?) is ...
4
votes
2answers
542 views

How do I derive the transformation law of a Weyl spinor under a Lorentz transformation?

Let $\xi$ be a spinor. If $(\theta ,\phi)$ are the parameters of a rotation and pure Lorentz transformation, then how can we prove that the transformation rule for $\xi$ can be written as $$\xi ...
2
votes
1answer
272 views

Geometric interpretation of perturbation theory in quantum field theory

I am studying GR right now, and one interesting thing I learned about vectors is that they are defined to have the same properties as derivatives. With this in mind, can I make a differential ...