Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

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$U(1)$ beta function of low energy effective Seiberg-Witten theory

My question is about figure3 (page 8) of this paper hep-th/9705131. Start from Seiberg-Witten theory, integrate out the charged high energy modes down to Higgs scale and we get a $U(1)$ gauge theory ...
10
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1answer
427 views

Auxiliary fields in supersymmetry

I know that auxiliary fields can be used to close the supersymmetry algebra in case the bosonic and fermionic on-shell degrees of freedom do not match. Could somebody please elaborate on this concept ...
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1answer
2k views

Pair production in complete vacuum

I want to prove that pair production (electron-positron) cannot happen in complete vacuum. This is why I obeyed conservation of energy and got equation: $$h \nu = m_e c^2 \Bigl[ \gamma(v_1) + ...
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2answers
173 views

re-defining the question, field quanta size in field theory? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: confusion on quantum field theory I asked are field quanta infinite in extent and I keep getting back that its the probabibility distribution. But this is a normal ...
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1answer
111 views

Field quanta- infinite in extent? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: confusion on quantum field theory Are field quanta infinite in extent as stated in Art Hobsons paper? What does this even mean? I've not seen any electrons or atoms that ...
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2answers
273 views

Number of gravitons launched by a proton

The wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauge_bosons describes how in QM exchanges of gauge bosons carry force, and describes how the graviton may also be a gauge boson. If the observable ...
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0answers
105 views

Finding symmetry of a part of an equation, given the group transformation property of another part

I am reading this paper on Dyons and Duality in $\mathcal{N}=4$ super-symmetric gauge theory. The author finds the zero modes or a dirac equation obtained by considering first order perturbations to ...
3
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1answer
91 views

Isometry group from information about the center of the group

I am reading this paper on Dyons and Duality in $\mathcal{N}=4$ super-symmetric gauge theory. The author finds the zero modes or a dirac equation obtained by considering first order perturbations to ...
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5answers
1k views

Elegant approaches to quantum field theory

I have been reading Quantum Mechanics: A Modern Development by L. Ballentine. I like the way everything is deduced starting from symmetry principles. I was wondering if anyone familiar with the book ...
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3answers
407 views

Question on inflation

I have two particular questions regarding the inflationary scenario. They are: 1.) What is the physical origin of the inflaton field? 2.) Why has the potential of the inflation field its particular ...
5
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1answer
420 views

“Hard wall”/ “soft wall”

I have encountered those terms in various places. As I understand it, "soft wall" can correspond to a smooth cutoff of some spacetime, while "hard wall" can be a sharp one, which can be described in ...
7
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1answer
670 views

Frasca's mapping of classical Yang-Mills to $\phi^4$ theory

I recently came across an article on the arXiv 0709.2042 written by Marco Frasca, where he provides a mapping between classical Yang-Mills theory to $\phi^4$ theory. Has his idea been fruitful in ...
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2answers
411 views

Understanding Cherns-Simons-Witten Theory

I want to read about Wittens work, on Cherns-Simons theory, and relations to knots and jones polynomials. I am extremely motivated to read his paper: Quantum Field Theory and Jones polynomial. What ...
7
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1answer
793 views

Change of variables in path integrals

I need to evaluate a path integral which involves a set of fields $X=\left\{ \psi_i \right\}$: $$ I = \int \prod_i \mathcal{D} \psi_i e^{-S \left[ \left\{ \psi_i \right\} \right] } $$ In order to ...
5
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2answers
404 views

Can scattering amplitudes be simplified with 1PI diagrams?

I have been teaching myself quantum field theory, and need a little help connecting different pieces together. Specifically, I'm rather unsure how to tie in renormalization, functional methods, and ...
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0answers
224 views

Matrix manipulation for Dirac matrices

From the Dirac equation in gamma matrices, we know that $$\gamma^i=\begin{pmatrix} 0 & \sigma^i \\ -\sigma^i & 0 \end{pmatrix}$$ and $$\gamma^0=\begin{pmatrix} I & 0 \\ 0 & -I ...
5
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3answers
734 views

Intuition for Path Integrals and How to Evaluate Them

I'm just starting to come across path integrals in quantum field theory, and want to get the right intuition for the them from the start. The amplitude for propagation from $x_a$ to $x_b$ is typically ...
6
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2answers
839 views

Eigenvalues of a quantum field?

Fields in classical mechanics are observables. For example, I can measure the value of the electric field at some (x,t). In quantum field theory, the classical field is promoted to an operator-valued ...
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2answers
393 views

The physicality of the photon propagator

The equation for the photon propagator is straightforward $$ D_{ij} = \langle 0 |T \{ A_{i}(x')A_{j}(x) \}|0 \rangle $$ However, $A_{i}(x)$ is gauge-dependent and therefore unphysical (in the arguable ...
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1answer
350 views

Integral in Peskin and Schroeder

I'm having a bit of a slow day, and can't see how to do the following integral in Peskin and Schroeder (page 107 for anyone with the book). We've derived in the centre of mass frame the integral over ...
11
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2answers
3k views

Charge conjugation in Dirac equation

According to Dirac equation we can write, \begin{equation} \left(i\gamma^\mu( \partial_\mu +ie A_\mu)- m \right)\psi(x,t) = 0 \end{equation} We seek an equation where $e\rightarrow -e $ and which ...
0
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0answers
51 views

Good Books on Gauge Theory [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Comprehensive book on group theory for physicists? I'm having a hard time trying to get my head around the fundamentals of gauge theory. I've taken classes in QFT and ...
4
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1answer
1k views

Local and Global Symmetries

Could somebody point me in the direction of a mathematically rigorous definition local symmetries and global symmetries for a given (classical) field theory? Heuristically I know that global ...
16
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1answer
592 views

If the ground states of interacting QFTs are so complicated, how did Nature find them?

My question was inspired by trying to understand the paper Quantum Algorithms for Quantum Field Theories, by Jordan, Lee, and Preskill. The main result of that paper is that scattering experiments in ...
4
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1answer
739 views

Scattering Processes in Scalar Yukawa Theory

I'm trying to compute nucleon-nucleon scattering in scalar Yukawa theory. Here we view a nucleon as a complex scalar field $\psi$ and a meson as a real scalar field $\phi$. They interact through ...
3
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1answer
163 views

Inclusion of information about external particles to calculate scattering amplitudes

In this (schematic) equation to calculate the scattering amplitude A by integrating over all possible world sheets and lifetimes of the bound states $$ A = \int\limits_{\rm{life time}} d\tau ...
5
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1answer
435 views

Labelling representations using isospin and hypercharge

Can someone explain how isospin and hypercharge can be used to label representations? What is the meaning of the term singlet, doublet etc in this context? In particular how can I use it to label ...
3
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0answers
125 views

Isospin and Hypercharge of the SU(2) bps monopole embedding

I am reading the paper Fundamental monopoles and multimonopole solutions for arbitrary simple gauge groups - Weinberg, Erick J . In appendix C of this paper the author states, that the solution ...
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1answer
523 views

Is it possible to take a QFT class knowing only basic quantum mechanics?

I'm in grad school and notice there are no prerequisites required for QFT in the physics department. In fact, the system allows me to sign up for the course just fine as a technical elective. But... ...
3
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2answers
389 views

Matrix operation in dirac matrices

If we define $\alpha_i$ and $\beta$ as Dirac matrices which satisfy all of the conditions of spin 1/2 particles , p defines the momentum of the particle, then how can we get the matrix form ? ...
7
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1answer
531 views

Residues in QFT propagator

It is a well known fact that the location of the pole of a propagator (in QFT) can be interpreted as the physical mass. Is there an interpretation for the residue of the propagator? Note: I´m ...
8
votes
1answer
469 views

What is the value of a quantum field?

As far as I'm aware (please correct me if I'm wrong) quantum fields are simply operators, constructed from a linear combination of creation and annihilation operators, which are defined at every point ...
2
votes
1answer
452 views

Curiosity episode with Stephen Hawking. The Big-Bang

In an episode of Discovery's Curiosity with host Stephen Hawking, he claims the Big Bang event can be explained from physics alone, and does not require the intervention of a creator. 1) His ...
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1answer
366 views

What are “hidden valley sectors”?

In this end of the year article, Prof. Strassler mentioned that hidden valley sectors could lead to some still open loopholes concerning the experimental discovery of supersymmetry and other BSM ...
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2answers
151 views

Stephen Hawking's theory of future backreaction

Several years ago, New Scientist featured an article on a new theory by Stephen Hawking that involved the future having some effect or "backreaction" on the present. As it would be very tedious and ...
1
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1answer
163 views

Action of the Lorentz group on scalar fields

The Lorentz groups act on the scalar fields as: $\phi'(x)=\phi(\Lambda^{-1} x)$ The conditions for an action of a group on a set are that the identity does nothing and that $(g_1g_2)s=g_1(g_2s)$. ...
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0answers
159 views

Yang-Mills Coulomb Gauge

My Question is how to explicitly move into the "Coulomb gauge" in Yang-Mills theory. Using the answer provided by QMechanic, one can move into the "temporal gauge" for Yang-Mills fields: Gauge fixing ...
2
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1answer
815 views

Feynman Rules for massive vector boson interactions

I am stuck at the beginning of a problem where I am given an interaction term that modifies the regular QED Lagrangian. It involves the interaction between a photon field and a massive vector boson: ...
0
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1answer
176 views

Scattering Amplitudes in Centre of Mass Frame

I'm reviewing page 59 of the QFT notes here and am a little confused by a reference frame argument. You can compute the second order probability amplitude term for nucleon-nucleon scattering to be ...
8
votes
1answer
525 views

Dispersion of ferromagnetic ($E\propto k^2$) and antiferromagnetic ($E\propto k$) spin wave

The dispersion of ferromagnetic spin wave at low energy is $E\propto k^2$, while $E\propto k$ for antiferromagnetic case. Is there a simple/physical argument (such as symmetry) for these results? ...
7
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2answers
622 views

Geometrical interpretation of the Dirac equation

Is there an intuitive geometrical picture behind the Dirac equation, and the gamma matrices that it uses? I know the geometric algebra is a Clifford algebra. Can the properties of geometric algebra, ...
5
votes
1answer
401 views

Path integral with zero energy modes

Consider the field integral for the partition function of a free non-relativistic electron in a condensed matter setting, i.e. $$ Z = ∫D\bar\psi D\psi \exp\left(-\sum_{k,ω} \bar\psi_{k,ω} (-iω + ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Lorentz invariance of the integration measure

This is regards to the lorentz invariance of a classical scalar field theory. We assume that the action which is $S= \int d^4 x \mathcal{L}$, is invariant under a Lorentz transformation. How do you ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Why do many people say vector fields describe spin-1 particle but omit the spin-0 part?

We know a vector field is a $(\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$ representation of Lorentz group, which should describe both spin-1 and spin-0 particles. However many of the articles(mostly lecture notes) I've ...
6
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1answer
256 views

Equivalent Representations of Clifford Algebra

I'm reviewing David Tong's excellent QFT lecture notes here and am a little confused by something he writes on page 94. We've considered the standard chiral representation of the Clifford Algebra, ...
3
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0answers
51 views

Linear combination of anomalous dimensions in effective potential on pseudomoduli space

In the paper of Intriligator, Seiberg, and Shih from 2007, they give an expression for the effective potential on the pseudo-moduli space $X$, estimated at large $X$ (equation 1.3). In this equation, ...
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0answers
102 views

The asymptotic behavior of the propagator of a field

In Steven Weinberg's book "The Quantum Theory of Fields" vol. I, Section 12.1, page 500, it writes: "We will write the asymptotic behavior of the propagator $\Delta_f(k)$ of a field of type $f$ in ...
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1answer
70 views

How does quantum entropy scales with the size of the sample?

Suppose i have a 3D bulk of physical matter with no black holes enclosed in a sphere of radius $R$. What is the scaling law of all quantum entropy in function of $R$? If the scaling is not $R^2$, in ...
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1answer
321 views

Lorentz Invariant Equation of Motion for Scalar Field

I'm trying to understand why you can't write down a first order equation of motion for a scalar field in special relativity. Suppose $\phi(x)$ a scalar field, $v^{\mu}$ a 4-vector. According to my ...
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1answer
161 views

QED Commutation Relations Implications

In Brian Hatfield's book on QFT and Strings there is the following quote: In particular $$ [A_i (x,t), E_j(y,t)] = -i \delta_{ij}\delta(x-y) $$ implies that $$ [A_i(x,t),\nabla \cdot E(y,t)] = ...