Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

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Sum of Green's functions in Condensed Matter

I am working on the Ginzburg-Landau model for Charge density waves, and I am carrying out the sum of Green's functions to calculate the terms in the GL model. I have the following question: Is the ...
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Interacting Lagrangian - Coupling constant and cutoff factor

I have a general question concerning a given interacting Lagrangian: $$\mathfrak{L}_I = \frac{g}{\Lambda^2} \bar{\chi} \ \gamma^\mu \gamma_5 \ \chi \ \partial^\nu F_{\mu\nu}$$ where $F_{\mu\nu}$ is ...
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Noether's Theorem: Foundations

I'm wondering on what principles Noether's theorem foots. More precisely: The action is a functional on the fields only. Why do we consider then variations of the space time too? In principle careful ...
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Do particles travel backward in time in a particle interpretation of field theory?

In this Phys.SE answer Ron Maimon stats: there is no relativistic particle formalism in which the particles have postive energies and casual propagation. You can either deal with fields in which ...
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Constructing Ward identity associated with conserved currents

Consider constructing the Ward identity associated with Lorentz invariance. It is possible to find a 3rd rank tensor $B^{\rho \mu \nu}$ antisymmetric in the first two indices, then the stress-energy ...
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How does Annihilation work?

How does annihilation work? I'm wondering why matter and antimatter actually annihilates if they come into contact. What exactly happens? Is that a known process? Is it just because of their different ...
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1answer
369 views

Physical reason for annihilation? [duplicate]

What is the fundamental reason as to why matter and antimatter annihilate? Is it because both particles and antiparticles are excitations of quantum fields, and the annihilation process corresponds ...
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1answer
62 views

Quantum numbers in QFT

In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics the state of a system is characterized by a vector of a Hilbert space. To characterize a state we need a complete set of commuting observables, and once we have ...
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96 views

Poincare Generators in terms of Position and Momentum

The $10$ generators of the Poincare group $P(1;3)$ are $M^{\mu\nu}$ and $P^\mu$. These generators can be determined explicitly in the matrix form. However, I have found that $M^{\mu\nu}$ and $P^\mu$ ...
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393 views

How does QFT help with entanglement?

I'm a bit confused. QFT is claimed to incorporate both Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity. Therefore it should address the problem of non-locality caused by entanglement. However when I search ...
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Stability Group of the Poincare Group

The stability group $G_\Sigma$ is a subgroup of the Poincare group $P(1;3)$. Its generators $X$ in the front form leave the hypersurface $\Sigma: x^+ = 0$ invariant. Phrased differently they satisfy ...
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197 views

Polar Decomposition of a Complex Scalar Field

People often write a complex scalar field via polar decomposition. What does this parametrization precisely mean? To be more explicit consider the following Lagrangian of a complex scalar field with ...
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1answer
84 views

Fourier expansion of the Klein-Gordon field

Is there a reason(both physical and mathematical) why the Klein-Gordon field is represented as a fourier expansion in the second quantization as opposed to other mathematical expansions? Be gentle ...
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91 views

Correlation functions and connection to ward identities

I have the following definition of a general correlation function $$ \langle \Phi(x_1)\dots \Phi(x_n)\rangle = \frac{1}{Z} \int [d\Phi] \Phi(x_1)\dots\Phi(x_n)e^{-S[\Phi]} $$ I have only just ...
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68 views

Operator Product Expansion in Massless 2D QED

In Peskin & Schroeder chapter 19 page 656, where the axial current anomaly of massless 2D QED is discussed, the authors go from: $$ ...
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210 views

Relation between symmetry factors

In $\phi^3$ theory, the generating functional for interacting field theory is given by: $$ Z_1(J) = \sum_{V=0}^{\infty} \frac{1}{V!} \Big[ \frac{iZ_g g}{6} \int \Big( \frac{1}{i}\frac{\delta}{\delta ...
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Free Particle Path Integral Matsubara Frequency

I am trying to calculate $$Z = \int\limits_{\phi(\beta) = \phi(0) =0} D \phi\ e^{-\frac{1}{2} \int_0^{\beta} d\tau \dot{\phi}^2}$$ without transforming it to the Matsubara frequency space, I can ...
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62 views

About the Hayden-Preskill circuit

Can someone summarize as to what are the problems and/or the open questions with the Hayden-Preskill circuit? (in the context of understanding black-holes or as a computer science question)It gives a ...
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What is the current state of research about the Hayden-Preskill circuit? [duplicate]

Can someone summarize as to what are the problems and/or the open questions with the Hayden-Preskill circuit? (in the context of understanding black-holes or as a computer science question)It gives a ...
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64 views

Heisenberg formalism of QFT [closed]

Has anyone tried to develop relativistic quantum theory along the lines of the Heisenberg picture and what's so difficult about promoting time to an operator??
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Spinor Commutator in Peskin and Schroeder

In (3.87, page. 53) Peskin and Schroeder write $$\psi(\vec{x}) = \int\frac{d^{3}p}{(2\pi)^{3}} \frac{1}{\sqrt{2E_{\vec{p}}}} e^{i\vec{p} \cdot \vec{x}} \sum_{s=1,2} (a_{\vec{p}}^{s}u^{s}(\vec{p}) + ...
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The interpretation of mass in quantum field theories

Consider a free theory with one real scalar field: $$ \mathcal{L}:=-\frac{1}{2}\partial _\mu \phi \partial ^\mu \phi -\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi ^2. $$ We write this positive coefficient in front of $\phi ^2$ ...
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Topologically distinct Feynman diagrams

Are these two diagrams topologically distinct? I consider $\phi^4$ theory and use MS-scheme. A vertex corresponding to counterterm $-\imath \frac{m^2 \lambda}{32 \pi^2 \epsilon}$ is denoted by ...
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8answers
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Is gravity just electromagnetic attraction?

Recently, I was pondering over the thought that is most of the elementary particles have intrinsic magnetism, then can gravity be just a weaker form of electromagnetic attraction? But decided the ...
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225 views

O(N) sigma model at large N

I would like to better understand the main principles of large-N expansion in quantum field theory. To this end I decided to consider simple toy-model with lagrangian (from Wikipedia) $ \mathcal{L} = ...
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What is the phase space for outgoing photons?

For a scattering process for which $n$ fermions are scattered, (by some conventions) the cross section acquires a phase space factor of: $$d\sigma \sim \prod_{i=1}^n\frac{d^3p_i}{(2\pi)^3 2E_i}$$ ...
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Derivation of (2.45) in Peskin and Schroeder

I'm having trouble understanding the step $$\left[\pi (\vec{x},t),\int d^{3}y ~(\frac{1}{2} \pi (\vec{y},t)^{2}+\frac{1}{2}\phi (\vec{y},t)(-\nabla^{2} +m^{2})\phi (\vec{y},t)) \right]$$ $$ =\int ...
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433 views

What are the limitations of the superspace formalism?

Just from reading this slightly technical introduction to supersymmetry and watching these Lenny Susskind lectures, I thought that the Lagrangian of any "reasonable" supersymmetric theory can always ...
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2answers
126 views

Functional Derivative in the Linear Sigma Model

In the linear sigma model, the Lagrangian is given by $$ \mathcal{L} = \frac{1}{2}\sum_{i=1}^{N} \left(\partial_\mu\phi^i\right)\left(\partial^\mu\phi^i\right) ...
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A question on the Bousso-Polchinski paper

In this famous paper by Bousso and Polchinski, Quantization of Four-form Fluxes and Dynamical Neutralization of the Cosmological Constant an example in M-theory compactification is given in section ...
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57 views

What is a superfluid in field theoretic terms?

I'm wondering how one precisely defines a superfluid in terms of the effective field theory description. In Nicolis's paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1108.2513 there seems to be an extremely simple ...
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How exact is the analogy between statistical mechanics and quantum field theory?

Famously, the path integral of quantum field theory is related to the partition function of statistical mechanics via a Wick rotation and there is therefore a formal analogy between the two. I have a ...
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Protection of the electron mass by chiral symmetry

In many textbooks it is said that mass renormalization of the electron mass is only logarithmic $\delta m \sim m\, log(\Lambda/m)$ because it is protected by the chiral symmetry. I understand that in ...
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Massless $\phi^3$ theory in $d=6$ dimensions

I am asked to calculate renormalization for a massless $\phi^3$ theory in $d=6$ dimensional space using dimensional regularization. I'm having trouble finding the three-point vertex correction as one ...
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86 views

Kallen–Lehmann spectral representation for an arbitrary spin

Let's have Kallen–Lehmann spectral representation for the scalar theory: $$ \tag 1 D(p) = \int \limits_{0}^{\infty} d(\mu^{2})\frac{\rho (\mu^{2})}{p^{2} - \mu^{2} + i\varepsilon}. $$ We can represent ...
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The ridge at LHC

One of the results obtained by LHC is the following diagram for p-Pb collisions: I would like to understand what is actually depicted in the figure, what should we expect based on theoretical ...
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30 views

Another Power Counting/ mass dimension question

Are the mass dimension of the Dirac field different from those of the Klein-Gordon field, or is this just another issue of "cannonical normalization?" For instance if $\mathcal{L}_{KG}=\int ...
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51 views

Probability and the propagator

Due to the Wiki article, "...In quantum mechanics and quantum field theory, the propagator gives the probability amplitude for a particle to travel from one place to another in a given time, or to ...
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Theory with interaction and the birth of bound states during propagation

Suppose we want to calculate vacuum expectation $$ \tag 1 D_{lm}(x - y) = \langle \Omega | \hat {T}\left( \hat {\Psi}_{l}(x)\hat {\Psi}_{m}^{\dagger}(y)\right)| \Omega\rangle = \langle \Omega| \hat ...
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105 views

A formula in Sung-Sik Lee's paper

I want to ask if anyone has gone through the derivation of the second equality in the following formula which comes from http://journals.aps.org/prb/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevB.80.165102.
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First quantization version of quantum field theory

In quantum mechanics, we have the word second quantization for identical particles. However, when dealing with localized states, first quantization version of quantum mechanics is also very ...
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4answers
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Do all massless particles (e.g. photon, graviton, gluon) necessarily have the same speed $c$?

I suppose there was a discussion already on speed-of-gravity-and-speed-of-light. But I silly wonder whether all the massless mediators of four fundamental forces, i.e. Graviton: $g_{\mu\nu}$ ...
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392 views

Why are only linear representations of the Lorentz group considered as fundamental quantum fields?

As described in many Q&As around here, fundamental quantum fields are expressed as irreducible representations of the Lorentz group. This argument is entirely clear - we live in a ...
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1answer
81 views

Schrödinger evolution for a Klein-Gordon equation

I have a problem with the transition from quantum relativistic wave equations (specifically Klein-Gordon equation) to QFT, since a lot of assumptions seem implicit. For example I have a problem with ...
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0answers
33 views

Renormalization of diagrams in QFT [duplicate]

Can any one suggest a good reference for studying renormalization of disjoint, nested and overlapping divergences in Feynman diagrams (for example, $\Phi^4$ theory)?
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LSZ reduction theorem derivation in Weinberg QFT

When deriving LSZ reduction theorem Weinberg in his QFT book have assumed n-point generalized Green functions, $$ G(q_{1},...,q_{n}) = \int d^{4}x_{1}...d^{4}x_{n}e^{-i\prod_{i =1}^{n}q_{j}x_{j}} ...
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One more time about LSZ-theorem

This question is the continuation of this one. For simplicity, let's use $(1)$ from the linked question (it is called n-point Green function and in particle case coincides with internal diagram), $$ ...
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102 views

From Symmetry Group to Physics Equations

To the extent that I know: There are symmetry groups like the rotation groups SO(3), the Groups of Poincare Transformations,... If the physics of a system has a symmetry group G, then it can be ...
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1answer
123 views

Lagrangian depends on second derivative of field

In case of the gauge-fixed Faddeev-Popov Lagrangian: $$ \mathcal{L}=-\frac{1}{4}F_{\mu\nu}\,^{a}F^{\mu\nu ...
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3answers
149 views

Global vs. local gauge group in mathematical sense - physics examples?

Upon reading about the principal bundle picture of (quantum) field theory I encountered two different definitions of the gauge group: Local gauge group $G$. Corresponds to the fibers of the ...