Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

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Life time of a wave

Let us consider, we have guessed a potential for a wave like non linear, which is propagating through space. We guess a Lagrangian for the wave $$L= \int r^{d-1} dr \left[\frac{1}{2}\dot \phi^2 ...
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3answers
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faster-than-c photons

As far as I know, according to quantum field theory, there are some photons that go faster than c, which is the speed of light in vacuum. However, there seems to be a paper and a corresponding ...
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198 views

Charge Renormalization and Photon Propagator

I'm trying to understand charge renormalization in QED. I know that one can write the full photon propagator as $$\frac{-i\eta_{\mu\nu}}{q^2(1-\Pi(q^2))}$$ where $\Pi$ is regular at $0$. Obviously ...
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203 views

How do fermion and scalar masses run with energy? Is the difference in their running the core of the hierarchy problem?

Do fermion and scalar running masses run in the same way? Specifically, what are the qualitative differences in the mass beta functions for, say, scalar $\lambda\phi^4$ field theory and the fermion ...
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122 views

Why doesn't one-photon-irreducible function have any pole at $q^2=0$?

I'm reading the QFT textbook by Weinberg. In volume one chapter 10 page 451, at the lower part of the page he says, Now, because $\Pi^*_{\mu\nu}(q)$ receives contributions only from ...
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139 views

Adiabatic quantum evolution of single photon or biphoton system

The prerequisite for adiabatic quantum evolution of single photon or biphoton system is as follows. We have to prepare a single photon or biphoton quantum system which has a ground and a higher level ...
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QM and Renormalization (layman)

I was reading Michio Kaku's Beyond Einstein. In it, I think, he explains that when physicsts treat a particle as a geometric point they end up with infinity when calculating the strength of the ...
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372 views

Calculating conductivity from Green's functions

I am trying to calculate the conductivity in the linear response regime of a disordered electron gas. (or eventually of a mean field Heavy fermion system with known one particle green's functions). I ...
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136 views

Field Strength Renormalisation in Peskin and Schroeder

In chapter 7 of Peskin and Schroeder they define the field strength renormalisation $Z$ for a quantum field to be the residue of the Fourier transform of the correlation function $$\langle \Omega | ...
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438 views

What goes wrong when one tries to quantize a scalar field with Fermi statistics?

At the end of section 9 on page 49 of Dirac's 1966 "Lectures on Quantum Field Theory" he says that if we quantize a real scalar field according to Fermi statistics [i.e., if we impose Canonical ...
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223 views

How are low energy effective actions derived in string theory?

For example the eq 2.1 here with regards to Type IIB. Unless I am terribly missing/misreading something Polchinski doesn't ever seem to derive these low energy supergravity actions. I would like to ...
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112 views

Are scalar fields invariant under unitary operators?

Is this correct? Are scalar fields defined as being invariant under $U^{\dagger}U$ transformations? If so, is this transformation also called the trivial transformation? Thanks for any help or ...
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195 views

What led to the electroweak and strong forces splitting?

Is the reason for the split believed to be spontaneous symmetry breaking? If so, did SSB occur because the Universe was cooling rapidly from extremely high temperatures?
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3d Ising Fixed point on general space manifold?

The headline question: Is it known how to construct an equivalent of the 3-D Ising Fixed point theory on an arbitrary 3-D manifold? Or any non-trivial d > 2 fixed point? The answer is maybe as simple ...
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878 views

Time ordering and time derivative in path integral formalism and operator formalism

In operator formalism, for example a 2-point time-ordered Green's function is defined as ...
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154 views

Is color confinement detected?

I'm a graduate student studying QFT. I'm quite interested that is color confinement detected or proved? (both directly and indirectly) Or it is just an assumption?
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Can an observer be the observed?

As a supplement to this question as to whether particles can be observers, supposing that the answer is yes. One could suppose a setup where particle A is observing particle B, but what to stop us ...
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314 views

energy momentum tensor and covariant derivative

In field theory, the energy momentum defined as the functional derivative wrt the metric $T_{\mu\nu}=\frac{2}{\sqrt{-g}}\frac{\delta S}{\delta g^{\mu\nu}}$ (up to a sign depending on ...
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Do commutation relations exist between superfields?

To quantize a theory, Klein gordon field for example, commutation relations are stablished. Or anticommuting ones in the fermionic case. If I have the Wess.Zumino model or the free model: ...
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198 views

What is non-Abelian about non-Abelian Chern-Simons' theory?

One is aware that in the axial gauge (say the light-cone gauge $A_{-}=0$) non-supersymmetric Chern-Simons' theory is a quadratic theory. Hence in this gauge there are no gauge-gauge interactions. Then ...
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105 views

Good introductory books on AdS/CFT correspondence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Introduction to AdS/CFT Since my question in a similar topic was deleted, I'll ask away and hope ppl won't come here telling me: this was already asked! :\ I have a ...
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121 views

Renormalization, symmetries and freedom to choose counterterms

I am considering the perturbative renormalization of a simple non-phenomenological QFT with Lagrangian ${\cal L}$ (for scalar fields with multiple generations). I understand that I can renormalize it, ...
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237 views

What is on the AdS side in AdS/CFT supergravity or string theory?

What really is on the AdS side in AdS/CFT, does it always have to be string theory or is sometimes supergravity "enough" or better suited to do calculations? From the answers to my earlier question, ...
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Connection between $\Delta x \Delta p \geq \frac{\hbar}{2}$ and $\Delta E \Delta t \geq \frac{\hbar}{2}$

Is there a way to derive second equation from the first one? I mean is there a connection between those two uncertainty relations? \begin{align} \Delta x \Delta p &\geq \frac{\hbar}{2}\\ \Delta ...
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374 views

What are the limitations of the superspace formalism?

Just from reading this slightly technical introduction to supersymmetry and watching these Lenny Susskind lectures, I thought that the Lagrangean of any "reasonable" supersymmetric theory can always ...
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2answers
121 views

Lorentz homogeneous group and observables

For generators of the Lorentz group we have the following algebra: $$ [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {R}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat {R}_{k}, \quad [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {L}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat ...
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Gauge fixing and degrees of freedom

Today, my friend (@Will) posed a very intriguing question - Consider a complex scalar field theory with a $U(1)$ gauge field $(A_\mu, \phi, \phi^*)$. The idea of gauge freedom is that two solutions ...
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What exactly is the connection between gauge transformations and symmetry groups?

For a given gauge transformation, say, the electromagnetic field, where observable quantities aren't affected by transformations of the form $$\mathbf{A}' = \mathbf{A} + \nabla \chi,$$ $$\phi' = \phi ...
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268 views

Solving Klein-Gordon equation in the Rindler coordinates - the Unruh effect

I am reading 't Hooft's notes on Black Holes. I want to find the solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation $(\tilde{x},\tilde{y}, \rho, \tau)$ in the Rindler coordinates which are $$x=\tilde{x}\,\,\,\,\ ...
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43 views

chirality oscillations in weak interaction

As far as I have understood, the mass $m$ of a fermion causes a coupling of the both chiralities $\psi_L$ and $\psi_R$. This coupling would induce an oscillation of the chirality within a time scale ...
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249 views

Why do we only have complete particle generations?

There are 3 generations of fermions in the standard model. I know that there is a theorem that states, that only complete generations are allowed. This means that there have to be quarks with three ...
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Baryogenesis - P and CP Violation

There are 4 requirements for baryogenesis to happen: 1. A process that violates baryonnumber conservation 2. The universe has to be out of equilibrium 3. P has to be violated 4. CP has to be violated ...
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107 views

Mathematical explanation of why Higgs has a vev

If Higgs ($\phi$) is a complex doublet: $ \phi_{1}+i\phi_{2}$ $\phi_{3}+i\phi_{4}$ how do I show that $\phi_3$ has a vev but the others do not? ...
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Descent equation and anomaly polynomial

I am just reading Ryu, Moore and Ludwig's paper on classifications of topological insulators and quantum anomaly. They are trying to relate the quantum anomaly as a signal of the presence of a ...
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259 views

Etymology of “Renormalisation”

Just out of curiosity, does anyone know why "renormalisation" is so named? Who first came up with the term, and why was it used? I did a mathematics undergraduate so to me "normalisation" means ...
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745 views

What is a general definition of the spin of a particle?

In quantum field theory, one defines a particle as a unitary irreducible representations of the Poincaré group. The study of these representations allows to define the mass and the spin of the ...
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204 views

How does spin appear in QFT?

In QFT, as I read, it appears naturally. It is connected with Poincare algebra, doesn't it? __ As explanation of the main part of the question. Operator of relativistic orbital angular momentum ...
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250 views

What is the formal definition of spin-independent vs. spin-dependent scattering?

In the search for WIMPs as the dark matter particle, there is an important distinction between spin-independent and spin-dependent scattering. Roughly, WIMPs scattering from nucleons through a ...
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351 views

Contact Term and Schwinger Term

In field theory, when 4-divergences of time-ordered Green's functions are computed, there are extra terms known as 'Schwinger terms'. When deriving the quantum equations of motion for time-ordered ...
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1answer
128 views

Poles bit in a propagator

Hi I am trying to derive the K-G propagator and am stuck on the bit where Cauchy's Integral formula is needed i.e evaluating from $$\int ...
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988 views
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337 views

Renormalization Group for non-equilibrium

For equilibrium/ground state systems, a (Wilson) renormalization group transformation produces a series of systems (flow of Hamiltonians/couplings $H_{\Lambda}$ where $\Lambda$ is the cut-off) such ...
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80 views

Path integral measure and symmetry

For a generic field theory the path integral measure is defined as, \begin{equation} \mathcal{D}\Phi = \prod_i d\Phi(x_i), \end{equation} where $\Phi$ is a generic field (i.e. it may be scalar, ...
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1answer
234 views

What determines the spin of fields in gauge field theories?

I understand that gauge bosons transform as the adjoint of their respective symmetry groups, but what determines the spin of the field? Can you have some gauge group where the adjoint is spin zero?
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2answers
261 views

Imposing anti-commutation relations on fermionic quasi-particles

In many theories of CMT, we assume the nature of quasi-particles (without giving proper justifications). For example, we assume nature of quasi-particles to be fermionic in case of a interacting ...
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153 views

Higgs boson sources

Every fundamental interaction in Physics comes from "some bosonic field" or "force carrier", according to QFT. We have 4 fundamental interactions(force carriers): Gravity (Gravitons) ...
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132 views

Proof of rotational and translational invariance?

If $ϕ^† ϕ$ is invariant under $SU(2) \times U(1)$, a Phys.SE question I recently posted, then does that mean $ϕ^† ϕ$ is invariant under rotations and translations?
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1answer
99 views

Can we obtain non-Lorentzian metric from Lorentzian metric, through renormalization methods?

Since low-energy, non-relativistic thermal field theories are defined in Euclidean spacetime, while high-energy relativistic theories are define in Minkowski spacetime, I was wondering if there are ...
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198 views

Zeta regularization gone bad

This may sound as a mathematical question, but it should be very familiar to physicists. I am trying to perform an expansion of the function $$f(x) = \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \frac{K_2(nx)}{n^2 x^2},$$ for ...
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Exact summation of a sub-class of diagram: do we know the exact solved problem?

In quantum field theories (to be relativistic, (non-)relativistic statistical or whatever), we have the powerful diagrammatic approach at our disposal. Most of the time we can not sum up all the ...