Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is the theoretical framework describing the quantisation of classical fields which allows a Lorentz-invariant formulation of quantum mechanics. QFT is used both in high energy physics as well as condensed matter physics and closely related to statistical field theory. Use ...

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O(N) sigma model at large N

I would like to better understand the main principles of large-N expansion in quantum field theory. To this end I decided to consider simple toy-model with lagrangian (from Wikipedia) $ \mathcal{L} = ...
7
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2answers
181 views

How to replace $T$-product with retarded commutator in LSZ formula?

I am reading Itzykson and Zuber's Quantum Field Theory book, and am unable to understand a step that is made on page 246: Here, they consider the elastic scattering of particle $A$ off particle $B$: ...
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Theory with interaction and the birth of bound states during propagation

Suppose we want to calculate vacuum expectation $$ \tag 1 D_{lm}(x - y) = \langle \Omega | \hat {T}\left( \hat {\Psi}_{l}(x)\hat {\Psi}_{m}^{\dagger}(y)\right)| \Omega\rangle = \langle \Omega| \hat ...
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1answer
70 views

Schrödinger evolution for a Klein-Gordon equation

I have a problem with the transition from quantum relativistic wave equations (specifically Klein-Gordon equation) to QFT, since a lot of assumptions seem implicit. For example I have a problem with ...
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0answers
32 views

Renormalization of diagrams in QFT [duplicate]

Can any one suggest a good reference for studying renormalization of disjoint, nested and overlapping divergences in Feynman diagrams (for example, $\Phi^4$ theory)?
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3answers
91 views

First quantization version of quantum field theory

In quantum mechanics, we have the word second quantization for identical particles. However, when dealing with localized states, first quantization version of quantum mechanics is also very ...
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39 views

One more time about LSZ-theorem

This question is the continuation of this one. For simplicity, let's use $(1)$ from the linked question (it is called n-point Green function and in particle case coincides with internal diagram), $$ ...
3
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1answer
94 views

From Symmetry Group to Physics Equations

To the extent that I know: There are symmetry groups like the rotation groups SO(3), the Groups of Poincare Transformations,... If the physics of a system has a symmetry group G, then it can be ...
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2
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1answer
70 views

can gapped systems have gravitational anomalies?

The question is in the title. If it is possible, what are some examples of gapped systems--either quantum field theories or condensed matter systems--which exhibit some kind of anomaly when coupled ...
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78 views

LSZ reduction theorem derivation in Weinberg QFT

When deriving LSZ reduction theorem Weinberg in his QFT book have assumed n-point generalized Green functions, $$ G(q_{1},...,q_{n}) = \int d^{4}x_{1}...d^{4}x_{n}e^{-i\prod_{i =1}^{n}q_{j}x_{j}} ...
2
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1answer
113 views

Lagrangian depends on second derivative of field

In case of the gauge-fixed Faddeev-Popov Lagrangian: $$ \mathcal{L}=-\frac{1}{4}F_{\mu\nu}\,^{a}F^{\mu\nu ...
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15 views

regarding vertex function and proton scattering

I am currently going through electromagnetic form factor. I came across the fact that since the proton is not an elementary particle its scattering(elastic) with electron can be modeled using general ...
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1answer
51 views

Expressing an adjoint representation Wilson line in terms of the fundamental representation

I'm working out some calculations with Wilson lines, defined as path-ordered exponential integrals of a gauge field: $$U = \mathcal{P}\exp\biggl(ig\int_{-\infty}^{\infty}\mathrm{d}x^\mu T^c ...
3
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0answers
54 views

why the pole of scalar current correlator imply a dilaton?

In one recent paper, the author says the massless pole of fermion-antifermion scalar current correlator $< {J_0}{J_0} >$ implies a dilaton, where ${J_0} = {\psi ^ + }\psi (x)$. Above (3.18) he ...
5
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3answers
135 views

Global vs. local gauge group in mathematical sense - physics examples?

Upon reading about the principal bundle picture of (quantum) field theory I encountered two different definitions of the gauge group: Local gauge group $G$. Corresponds to the fibers of the ...
5
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1answer
61 views

Particle/Pole correspondence in QFT Green's functions

The standard lore in relativistic QFT is that poles appearing on the real-axis in momentum-space Green's functions correspond to particles, with the position of the pole yielding the invariant mass of ...
4
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1answer
75 views

Pressure and Density Using a General Lagrangian

Given a lagrangian of a form: \begin{equation}\mathcal{L}=f(\phi,\partial_{\mu}\phi\partial^{\mu}\phi)\end{equation} where $f$ is a function, I need to derive pressure and density in a FLRW universe ...
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69 views

Renormalizability of standard model

I'm wonder what precisely is meant by the renormalizability of the standard model. I can imagine two possibilities: The renormalizability of all of the interaction described by the Lagrangian before ...
2
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1answer
89 views

Massless $\lambda \phi^4$ QFT

The $\lambda \phi^4$ quantum filed theory is the textbook example (which probably cannot be constructed nonperturbatively; I'm purely interested in perturbation theory). However, usually one treats ...
2
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1answer
47 views

Conformal compatification of Minkowski and AdS

How do I show that the compactification of Minkowski is given by the quadric $$uv-\eta_{ij}x^{i}x^{j}=0$$ with an overall scale equivalence in the coordinates.I get that for $v \neq 0$, the surface ...
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4answers
2k views

Which Is More Fundamental, Fields or Particles?

I hope that I am using appropriate terminology. My confusion about Quantum Theory (beyond my obvious unfamiliarity with its terminology) is basically twofold: 1) I lack an adequate understanding of ...
6
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0answers
48 views

Ambiguity in Asymptotic Perturbative Series and Instantons

I know there are a number of questions about the asymptoticity of perturbative series and about instantons on StackExchange (e.g. Instantons and Non Perturbative Amplitudes in Gravity from user566, ...
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2answers
119 views

How do different fields interact with each other?

Recently I've seen a few talks and lectures about Quantum Field Theory. They explained what a "particle" means in a field, and that a large enough excitement in a certain field can excite another ...
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3answers
676 views

Why aren't all photons virtual particles even in the “vacuum” of empty space? [duplicate]

I'm thoroughly confused about the nature of electromagnetic radiation. Light is supposed to exhibit both wave and particle characteristics. But does that mean that it is both a wave and a particle or ...
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1answer
40 views

power counting and (superficial) non-renormalizability

Comment: This stuff is new to me so it doesn't entirely make sense (yet). Question: As I understand from Peskin and Schroeder chap 10 if you have a theory with interaction terms $\lambda \phi^n$ in ...
4
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1answer
215 views

Will we need to update Electrodynamics?

A contradiction to the Electrodynamics by the experiment. The author has said that, accordning to the experiment, photon is no more gauge invariant? Why is that? An important thing is that Although ...
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2answers
327 views

Why are only linear representations of the Lorentz group considered as fundamental quantum fields?

As described in many Q&As around here, fundamental quantum fields are expressed as irreducible representations of the Lorentz group. This argument is entirely clear - we live in a ...
5
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2answers
135 views

QFT's that have no action

What does it mean to have a QFT that can not be encoded by an action. What is by far the most powerful approach of study in such a case. What is the best studied physical theory that falls into this ...
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0answers
59 views

A question on spin algebra

In scattering theory, one can form a lorentz invariant quantity by $\epsilon_{\mu 1 2\nu}P^{\mu}_{1}P^{\nu}_{2}$ which is really $1\otimes 1$ 's spin 0 state. Is there such a kind of argument to show ...
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2answers
91 views

Can a fundamental particle black hole with conserved charge emit Hawking radiation?

Let's says there is a fundamental particle: That is so massive that it is a black hole by itself (Compton wavelength < Schwarzschild radius) That carries a conserved quantum number (e.g. charge ...
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1answer
125 views

Black hole thermodynamics in a time dependent metric

For a time dependent space time metric, to get the thermodynamics, does the standard procedure of Wick rotating the time, and then calculating the free energy, work ?
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0answers
32 views

Young Tableau Projectors: Does the order of symmetric and anti-symmetric projectors matter?

Given a Young Tableau we find the irreducible basis of an arbitrary tensor by projecting, The projectors are usually defined as first symmetrise over the row entries and then anti-symmetrise over the ...
8
votes
1answer
82 views

Would a high energy bottom quark 'decay' to a top quark?

The reason for the long life time of $B$-hadrons is that the CKM element $|V_{tb}| > 0.999$, meaning that the preferred decay of the $b$-quark is to a $t$-quark (and vice versa). However because ...
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1answer
89 views

Why is string theory a two dimensional quantum (conformal) field theory on its worldsheet?

In string theory, we quantize the two dimensional field theory on the string's worldsheet. I have a question about this kind of quantization of string theory: did we have similar theory for point-like ...
3
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0answers
55 views

Supersymmetric cancellation of loop contributions in a SUSY gauge theory

It is known that in SUSY models, loop contributions are automatically zero leading to a technically natural solution of the Higgs mass hierarchy problem. In many SUSY books/notes, it is often shown ...
5
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2answers
81 views

Protection of the electron mass by chiral symmetry

In many textbooks it is said that mass renormalization of the electron mass is only logarithmic $\delta m \sim m\, log(\Lambda/m)$ because it is protected by the chiral symmetry. I understand that in ...
2
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1answer
38 views

If non-zero cosmological constant interpreted as a repulsive filed, what would be the properties of this field's quanta?

If non-zero cosmological constant interpreted as a repulsive filed, what would be the properties of the excitation of such field, i.e. the particle which serves as the field's quantum? What would be ...
2
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1answer
54 views

How exactly to show that s-matrix elements diverges because time-ordering is not well determined?

Let's have s-matrix: $$ S_{\alpha \beta} = \langle \alpha | \hat {S} | \beta \rangle , $$ $$\hat{S} = \hat{T}e^{-i\int \hat{L}(x)d^{4}x}, \quad \hat{T} \left( \hat{\Psi}(t) \hat{\Psi}(t') \right) = ...
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votes
1answer
71 views

Naive unification of scalar QFT and GR is possible?

I am thinking on the Klein-Gordon equation with curved (non-diagonal) metrics. Is it possible? Doesn't have it some inherent contradiction? If yes, what? If no, what is this combined formula?
2
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1answer
128 views

Rigorous QFT on a Torus

The problem description for the Yang-Mills Existence and Mass Gap problem (http://www.claymath.org/sites/default/files/yangmills.pdf) says in its "Mathematical Perspective" section that Some ...
2
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1answer
37 views

total cross section and contribution

Since in electron electron scattering if initial energy is quite large then muon antimuon production process can also take place which also contributes thus increases the total cross section. What ...
6
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1answer
173 views

History of the names “Feynman-gauge” & “Landau-gauge”. How arised & how settled?

Warning: Students, stay away from antiquities. The aim to learn is to survive. Hi. Today the nomenclatures Feynman gauge and Landau gauge seem established, but could you explain the history? It's ...
11
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1answer
191 views

Conformal/trace anomaly and index theorem

I am reading the chapters on characteristic classes and the index theorems in Nakahara. It is proven in the text that any chiral or gravitational anomaly $\mathcal{A}$ is given by $$\mathcal{A}=\int ...
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2answers
139 views

Quantum field theory's completeness

I realize Quantum Field Theory doesn't include gravity at all. Other than that, does QFT completely describe all electromagnetic and nuclear interactions? In other words, does it describe (at least) ...
8
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1answer
195 views

Normal ordering in curved spacetime

In the flat spacetime, one can perform normal-ordering to set the energy of the vacuum state to zero. I read in some places that this procedure cannot be consistently performed in the curved ...
4
votes
1answer
61 views

How to cancel infinite mass corrections for quantities without counterterms?

I'm trying to understand how infinite mass corrections are cancelled for a particle that is massless at tree level. In short the problem is that we have infinite diagrams, but we don't have a ...
3
votes
1answer
88 views

Anyons: Effect of braiding on fusion multiplicities

In the theory of non-abelian anyons, essential information is stored in the fusion multiplicities or Verlinde coefficients $N_{ab}^c$. Having the Pants Decomposition in mind, it is possible to use ...
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2answers
174 views

Why isn't Quantum Yang-Mills Rigorous?

Obviously one of the major components of the Yang-Mills existence and mass gap problem of the Clay institute is the proof that 3+1d quantum yang-mills theory has rigorous foundations. This (I believe) ...
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1answer
72 views

How does determinism manifest out of QFT?

Classical electrodynamics is deterministic. QED is indeterministic, or probabilistically random. Yet they agree with each other? What am I missing?