2
votes
1answer
55 views

Large wavelength limit of gluons

Does there exist a classical limit of QCD? I mean in the sense of wave particle duality of eg photons. Is there any similar thing for gluons?
4
votes
1answer
80 views

If virtual particles have negative mass why do they contribute positive mass to atoms?

According to Lawrence Krauss, atoms containing in our body consists of merely 10% (if I remember correctly) of our total mass. The rest come from virtual particles popping in and out of existence from ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Is this a photograph of Surface Plasmon Resonance?

Does this photograph depict surface plasmon resonance? PHOTO 1 - Ellipsometric style photograph produces blue-green and purple resonance waves from nanogold-like tubule. PHOTO 1 was cropped from ...
4
votes
1answer
103 views

The relation between classical and quantum vacua

First let me clarify what I mean by vacuum. Suppose we are concerned with a theory of fields $\phi ^i$ defined on a stationary globally hyperbolic spacetime $M$ (I want the spacetime to be stationary ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Quantum fluctuations in the non-relativistic limit

Is there any way to describe quantum fluctuations in ordinary quantum mechanics? For instance, a proton fluctuating into a proton-$\pi^0$ state and then back to a proton? What are the relevant ...
6
votes
2answers
176 views

No non-trivial UV asymptotically free and IR free

How it could be proven that a non-trivial theory cannot be both asymptotically free and IR free (g=0 both in the UV and IR with some interpolating function in between)? This is of course contrary to ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

What is quark transverse momentum?

When you google my question you get something on the order of 400 000 results but none of them explains how it is defined (No I didn't check them all). I know what the words quarks, transverse and ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

What is the nucleon axial charge?

Can someone point me to a short definition of what the nucleon axial charge is?
5
votes
2answers
112 views

Neutral pions and chromodynamics

$\pi^0$ particles are either up-antiup or down-antidown (or strange-antistrange?) They must be opposite colors to preserve neutrality. Why don't the opposite quarks annihilate?
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Charge in terms of wavefunctions

For a charged quantum particle, say, an electron or a quark, how in the particle's wavefunction is the electric charge represented? Is it truly possible to represent electric charge using the wave ...
3
votes
2answers
157 views

Simulating a proton

How much computing power would it take to simulate a single proton from the bottom up, without taking any shortcuts whatsoever? My current understanding is that: A proton is basically a seething ...