Proton decay is a hypothetical form of radioactive decay in which the proton decays into lighter subatomic particles. There is currently no experimental evidence that proton decay.

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Can photons decay without interaction?

Can photons decay like other particles without interacting with other particles or fields, i.e. by just "being"? In case the answer is "no" - does this have anything to do with them travelling at c, ...
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What happens to the nucleus energy when it decays?

When an atom decays into another atom, what happens to the potential energy of the nucleus ? I think it will get more negative because, in general, through fission and fusion an atom tries to get a ...
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Why is energy released during decay?

Why is energy released when an atom decays into another atom, even though no energy is added? What does the mass defect mean? Is it because a nucleus which decays is unstable (proton/neutron = 1)? ...
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are protons in proton decay allowing theories stable inside nuclei?

It is known that isolated neutrons are unstable, but that neutrons inside nuclei can be stable. I know there are candidate theories that allow proton decay but I wonder whether in these theories ...
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If neutron would be lighter by 1 MeV, how stability of Hydrogen could be changed?

In current Universe proton is stable and the following reaction does not go $ p + e \rightarrow n + \overline{\nu_e}$ Currently proton is lighter than neutron by 1.293 MeV. If neutron would be ...
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199 views

Charge on the remaining atom after Alpha decay

In radioactive alpha decay, a helium atom is shown to be released. However, I was told that only thing released is a helium nucleus. If so, then it should leave two of its electrons in the atom ...
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Why do gauge bosons/leptoquarks not mediate proton decay in the Pati-Salam model?

In the Pati-Salam $\mathrm{SU}(4)_c\times\mathrm{SU}(2)_L\times\mathrm{SU}(2)_R$ model, I see Wikipedia and some slides mention this model doesn't predict gauge mediated proton decay without giving ...
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Can we observe proton decay?

I know that the half life of a proton is more than $6.6\cdot 10^{33}$ years (antimuon decay). I have found this data on Wikipedia proton decay but I do not know the probability distribution that leads ...
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Color-charge conservation in proton decay

In some extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics (Supersymmetry with R-parity violation being a prominent example), the proton is allowed to decay, e.g. via $p\to e^+\pi^0$: While this ...
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Questions on beta-decay

According to my textbook, for all the beta decays, it is required that the mass of the original atom to be heavier than the mass of the final atom. Is this due to the fact that all the beta decays ...
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It's possible to create a proton colliding a positron with enough energetic photons?

If a proton is supposed to decay in a positron and gamma ray photons is possible to obtain the opposite process colliding enough energetic photons with a positron and create a proton ?
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The life of proton

I have two questions regarding protons 1) Wikipedia says Mean lifetime of a proton $>2.1×10^{29}$ years (stable) Obviously this means practically nothing happens to a proton, but what does ...
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Dark matter and SO(10) grand unification

$SO(10)$ grand unified theories nicely accommodate a massive $\sim 10^{14-15}\; GeV$ sterile neutrino. Would this be a viable dark matter candidate? I haven't found any specific material regarding ...
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Relation between decay probability and the energy of particle

Is there any way to find the energy of a particle through its decay probability?
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Does the strong (nuclear) force ever contribute to decay?

Does the strong (nuclear) force ever contribute to decay ? Or is the weak nuclear force the only decaying force ?
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Can colliders detect B violation?

I think there is some theoretical uncertainty whether high-energy collisions can violate B. It is known that at high temperature (higher than the Higgs scale) you violate B by SU(2) instantons. But in ...