Polarization characterizes the oscillations in time the electromagnetic field is doing in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction of a wave

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Why is reflected light polarised?

Why is reflected light polarised? I have learnt about Brewster's angle, and how at a particular angle all light reflected is polarised, but do not understand why. Is this something that could be ...
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Ferromagnets - Permanent?

When researching about the Curie-Temperature and magnets in general, something got me confused. What is the difference between a ferromagnet and a permanent magnet? In a ferromagnet the spins are ...
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Polarisation effect due to reflection [closed]

By Malus' law we know that when an unpolarised light falls on a thin glass sheet, the light that gets reflected is polarised light as only the s-component (only 15%) is present with very low intensity ...
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Why does quantum mechanics produce different predictions for Bell test experiments than classical mechanics?

I understand that experimental results from Bell test experiments have shown that measured correlation is a cosine function of the angle between the detectors. What I am struggling to grasp is why ...
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Is the polarization of light changed by gravity?

The Gravitational_redshift shows, that the wavelength of light gets altered in a gravitational field. But what about polarization of light? I imagine that e.g. by tidal forces circular polarized light ...
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What is polarisation, spin, helicity, chirality and parity?

Polarisation, spin, helicity, chirality and parity keep confusing me. They seem to be related, but exactly how they are related is unclear to me. Can someone maybe give a short overview about what ...
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Linear polarized 3D glasses and the physical shape of light waves

Looking into how linear polarized 3D glasses work, I keep getting explanations that boil down to this: However, I always assumed that a light wave was depicted in diagrams like this... ...to more ...
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Does unpolarized light means that photon is in superposition state?

I read that a polaroid filter is made of many long chain of molecules aligned in one direction and will only allow the vibration of light with the same alignment as the filter to be absorbed. I ...
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Why does concentrated parahydrogen in hydrogenation reaction exhibit hyperpolarized signals in proton NMR spectra?

In wikipedia it says "When an excess of parahydrogen is used during hydrogenation reactions (instead of the normal mixture of orthohydrogen to parahydrogen of 3:1), the resultant product exhibits ...
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Can polarization occur if both charges are neutral?

If I keep neutral conductive pieces of some metal close to a neutral conductive sheet, what will happen? Will any of them get polarized or nothing will happen. My guess is nothing will happen as for ...
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What do the $T, E, B$ in polarization spectra mean?

I was reading about CMB Polarization here. I know that $E$ and $B$ stand for E-mode and B-mode, but what does the $T$ mean? The author states that there are 3 observables: $T, E, B$ and six spectra: ...
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3D glasses giving the opposite effect to that expected

I have just finished watching the new Star Wars movie (The Force Awakens), and during the end credits, text is shown upon a background of stars. Wearing the 3D glasses, I noticed that the text appears ...
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Is polarization a stable state?

Do a polarized light beam stays polarized over large distance or does it kind of relax and eventually become unpolarized?
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How polarized object's polarized atoms behaves like charge?

Electrical polarization is just the shifting of the constituent atoms' protons and electrons in opposite directions. This creates a bound charge, and this bound charge creates voltage and thus an ...
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Energy absorbed in Polarization of light

A polarizer absorbs all light that vibrates in a particular direction. Where does the energy absorbed by the "chain molecules" of the polarizer go? Does it change the structure of the molecules? Is ...
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Can we consider light from the Sun during sunrise and nightfall as polarised?

On sunrise and nightfall light looks different, more orange or more dark. Some frequencies are filtered or light travels longer. The energy corresponding to this light is obviously lower than light ...
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Recognizing linear or polarized light and seeing its direction

I was watching Walter Lewin's course, and he said he learned a way to see and recognize polarized or linear light. And i wonder what it might be? What is the tricks?
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Difference between twofold infinity and simple infinity in relation to quantum mechanics

$\newcommand{\k}[1]{\left | #1 \right\rangle }$ In his "The Principles of Quantum Mechanics", Paul Dirac states: $$c_1\k A + c_2 \k B = \k R$$ Given two states corresponding to the ket vectors ...
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Why does vertical polarizer absorb the vertically polarized waves?

They explain that vertical wires serve as the secondary transmitter: the waves induce since oscillations of electrons in the wire effectively absorbing the wave. Ok, let's believe that wave is ...
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What is the relation between charge and polarization?

On one hand, in this "Measurement of polarisation" lab manual, polarization is surface charge density, $P=\frac{Q}{A}$, in other words, charge an polarization are essentially the same thing. On the ...
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angular momentum of electromagnetic wave

EM waves that are circularly or elliptically polarized have angular momentum. Is there any experiment that proves/shows this ? like shine a light on something and it rotates ? The correspondence is ...
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What is the significance of 'energy ellipsoid'?

Well, today I was reading Tensors by Feynman in his lectures, where he introduced the concept of 'energy ellipsoid'. This is the following excerpt: [...] the polarization tensor can be measured ...
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Why does work done for polarization per unit volume contain $1\over 2$as in $\frac{1}{2} \mathbf E\cdot \mathbf P?$

Work done per unit volume to change the polarization from $0$ to $\bf P$ is given as the integral of $\mathbf E\cdot d\mathbf P'$ as $$u_p= \int_0^{\bf P}\mathbf E\cdot d\mathbf P' \;$$ integrating ...
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Nature of Particle waves [closed]

My question relates to the properties of a single particle (for example purposes lets use a photon) Forgive me if this subject has already been answered by science, i am not aware that it has been ...
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Stokes Polarimetric Measurements

In Stokes polarimetry, a method is presented in "The Handbook of Optics", Chp 22 by Chipman under light measuring polarimetry that presents a data reduction equation for finding the 4 Stokes ...
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Polarized light in single mode fiber

In single mode fiber the light propagates in two orthogonal planes. Input will be linearly polarized light, which state of polarization will be on output and why? And if there will be some different ...
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Where does $\tan 2a = \frac{B}{A - C}$ come from? [closed]

I was reading about elliptical polarisation and stumbled across an equation involving the rotation angle of the ellipse. It has the form $$\tan(2a) = \frac{B}{A - C}$$ where $B$, $A$ and $C$ are the ...
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Effect of polarizer on light's intensity

If you take unpolarized light and pass it through a polarizer, it's intensity will be half of what it was (ideally). Following Malus' Law I'd issume that if I pass this now polarized light through ...
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Polarization Of Light From A Calculator Display

Okay so I couldn't see anything that matched this, partially because I do not know what aspect of polarization it fits into, but in Physics class we did a practical and as part of an extra bit of it ...
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Two spheres (one positive, one negative) - electric field

I posted yesterday about a problem I had and I have managed to solve one of the two I think (Here is the original post: Dielectric field in a homogenous electric field ). I didn't want to edit the ...
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Dielectric field in a homogenous electric field

I'm working through my workbook right now and currently am stuck on the chapter about dielectrics. The term $\vec{E}=\frac{3}{\epsilon_r +2}\vec{E_0}$ was introduced without a proper proof. Instead ...
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Are solar cells designed to be isotropic to polarization?

The typical performance charts I see report efficiency (IPCE) as a function of wavelength. Since the light coming from the sun has random polarization, wouldn't a solar cell with anisotropic ...
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What is the exact meaning (distribution) of unpolarized light?

Are there statistical properties to unpolarized light? For example, is the polarization of individual particles in an unpolarized beam has a normal distribution or a uniform distribution etc. of ...
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Can someone help me with this polarized elements problem? [closed]

We have 3 polarized elements P1, P2, P3. P1 and P3, with the polarization axes perpendicular, are place in front of a light fascicle with the intensity I. P2 is placed between the other two makend ...
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How are the photon and electron entangled in this situation? [duplicate]

If one of the photons in an entangled pair produced in parametric down conversion is absorbed by an electron or atom than this elecfron must be entangled with tge other photon. In what degree of ...
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which is correct way to find error in degree of linear polarization?

I have a set of "degree of polarization (DOP)" values for a star. Assume there are 10 DOP values in the set. DOP is defined as square root of sum of squares of fractional Stokes parameters, namely q ...
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70 views

Why do 3d movies have a red and blue “double image”? [closed]

My question is why do 3d movies have a red and blue"double image" that is basically just a few inches to the right and left of the real image. And how does this help us see the image as "3d". Does it ...
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Polarized light microscopy

Why is polarized light used in microscopy for the analysis of rocks(for example)? Why not use unpolarized light? What is it with polarized light that makes the analysis of rocks better? Edit: please ...
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Electric field vector in visualization of polarization of EM wave

When we were taught polarization at the high school level, we were told that during polarization, we should consider the EM wave being axially or planarly filtered (e.g. by a polarizing sheet with ...
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Spin and polarization, QM vs QFT

On page 34 of A. Zee's book QFT in a Nutshell, he states: I expect you to remember the concept of polarization from your course on electromagnetism. A massive spin 1 particle has three degrees of ...
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$\pi$, $\sigma$ - atomic transitions with respect to the magnetic field axis

I am confused about the atomic transition with different polarized lights. I post the pictures as follows. There are four cases. In case 1, the right-handed circular polarized light ...
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Is a single photon always circularly polarized?

While trying to understand polarization in quantum field theory, I wondered how a single photon could go through a linear polarizer. I found a paper which asked "Is a single photon always circularly ...
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Does measurement really affect polarization?

The answer must be yes but I have trouble dealing with the explanation given here. As you can see the light is polarized at an angle theta to x axis. After it passes the polarizer A which is along x ...
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What are some of the empirical proofs of electromagnetic polarization? [closed]

I am aware of how polarization follows from Maxwell's equations, and how it is possible in transverse waves in general. I also know that Huygens, in his great Treatise on Light, first discovered and ...
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How can slightly elliptically polarized light pass through a polarizer set to pass linearly polarized light?

How can slightly elliptically polarized light pass through a polarizer set to pass linearly polarized light? And what will be the corresponding change in intensity?
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Does orbital angular mometum has no meaning for single photons?

In the quantization of free electromagnetic field, it is found that the left-circularly polarised photons corrsponds to helicity $\vec{S}\cdot\hat p=+\hbar$ and right-circularly polarised photons ...
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Rotation of polarization through optical activity

When a vertically polarized beam of light is incident on an optically active substance and rotated through some angle $\theta$, how is the degree of rotation related to the length of the path through ...
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286 views

Why do charged objects attract pieces of paper, but not pieces of metal?

I do not understand one concept in Physics: why charged objects (eg. a charged rod or comb) attract pieces of paper when brought close to them, but do not attract pieces of metal. I know that the ...
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Which photons pass through a circular annulus?

Passing light through a circular sieve: Well, actually, let’s think about radar or microwaves with a wavelength of order a centimeter or two, so you can tailor your aperture, say by etching a silver ...
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Why isn't sunlight polarized?

My guess: Because polarization happens only when amplitude exists and because the sun is so big that the light rays arriving on earth literally come in all direction, their amplitude is then ...