Polarization characterizes the oscillations in time the electromagnetic field is doing in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction of a wave

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Is it correct that the polarized scatter of a polarized light source is max. orthogonal to the light source?

First of all, is the statement above correct? And if so, is there a constant gradient, with no polarized scatter parallel to the polarized source up to fully polarized at 90 degrees?
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37 views

What happens when two polarized lights of the same wavelength interfere at 90 degrees with each other?

am I right in assuming that if I cross two polarized lights of the same wavelength the result would be destructive interference? I don't mean 90 degrees as in 'orthogonal polarization', but the two ...
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Why does some peoples' hair look blue when I look out the train window while wearing sunglasses?

Specifically, when I look through the window, black hair looks blue when people pass the window outside, and black shiny benches look like somebody painted them blue. Pretty sure my sunglasses are ...
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33 views

Amplitude of unpolarized EM wave after a polarizer

The amplitude of a linearly polarized wave after a polarizer is $$E_1 = E_0\cos(\theta)$$ and the intensity is $$I_1 = I_0\cos^2(\theta)$$ Now for unpolarized light, the time averaged amplitude is ...
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Electric field inside a material

I was thinking about the polarisation, and how the electric field behaves inside the material of permittivity greater than one. I think to have understood what happens to D and P, but is not clear ...
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70 views

Why don't E&M fields change orientation after hitting a surface?

In essentially every derivation of the Fresnel equations, the general problem of radiation hitting a surface at a certain angle is broken into two parts (out of which we hope the solution any general ...
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13 views

Easiest way to levitate a ferromagnetic material that is not a permanent magnet?

I want to levitate an iron cube that is not a polarized permanent magnet. What is the easiest way to do this?
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16 views

How do particles entangle and how does polarization work? [closed]

I am trying to learn about how particles get entangled and when I searched it up I did not understand how polarization worked. I am still in elementary school so if please make the definition simple! ...
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32 views

Application of Snell's law for an extraordinary wave?

I have read [1] that when the light enters a birefringent material with optical axis perpendicular to the plane of incidence that the angle of refraction of the extraordinary wave can be found by ...
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What is the relationship between the E mode polarisation of the CMB and the velocity of the primordial plasma precisely?

I understand that the CMB is polarised into E and B modes due to Thompson scattering in the primordial plasma of the early universe. Also, I understand that this polarisation is directly related to ...
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42 views

Is it scientifically possible to stop a screens polarization by adding a layer? [closed]

Back story: At work we deal with confidential data, however our desk layout does not allow for screen privacy. We do not a privacy screens and are not allowed to take apart our screens. In searching ...
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Polarized Coherent Beam Hits a Polarizer Off-Polarization Angle While Varying Distance?

Just wondering about an experiment that should be easy to perform on an optical bench: A coherent beam is polarized. It then hits another polarizer which is set to permit a polarization angle off ...
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30 views

Why must the plane of polarization be the same for two waves to interfere?

While solving a problem that involved both the concepts, I stumbled upon the following fact, but I cannot somehow visualize the idea. Could anyone please give me some intuition as to why the above ...
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39 views

Double slit with opposite circular polarizers

Let's say I'll send linearly polarized light onto double slit but in front of one slit I'll have quarter wave plate and before the other I'll have 3/4th wave plate (half+quarter? minus quarter?) ...
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1answer
40 views

Could you use polarization filters to make a privacy screen?

I remember seeing that brusspup video where the polarization filter on the monitor was removed and put it in his glasses, causing only the wearer to see the screen. (, and) I was thinking, would ...
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727 views

Why can a solution show optical rotation?

Why can a solution show optical rotation? A solution, as a liquid, is rotationally isotropic, right? So, even if the molecules are chiral, because of the random orientation of the molecules, shouldn't ...
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9 views

Mueller matrix and Lorentz group

I have just learned about Stokes vectors and Mueller matrices for description of polarized light. In the text I studied there is clear restriction for the Stokes vector $\vec S$ that ...
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106 views

Jones matrices of a mystery device

When considering a Jones matrix $$J=\ \left( \begin{array}{ccc} \cos\phi & -\sin\phi \\ \sin\phi & \cos\phi \\ \end{array} \right) $$ I understand that the effect of a device described by ...
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24 views

Birefringence not caused by polarization?

Is there any other way for a material to be birefringent apart from it causing double refraction based on polarization? I.e. can a material cause double refraction in a way that does not depend on the ...
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66 views

Can a beam splitter distinguish between more than two polarizations?

The following is based on a very basic understanding of lasers, that may be approximate or altogether completely erroneous. Given a (single-mode) laser beam, a beam-splitting polarizer ...
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28 views

Why does Raman activity depend on polarizability?

Raman spectroscopy essentially records photoluminescence: (source) and a molecule is considered to be Raman active when there is a change of polarizability $\alpha$ (where $\mathbf{P}=\alpha ...
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30 views

What is filtered through the linear polarization of EM light? E field, B field or both?

I know that for EM waves (i.e sunlight) for any E wave in any direction, there is B field perpendicular to it. However, when we pass that EM wave through the linear polarization filter, what actually ...
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1answer
43 views

Converting Stokes Parameters to Jones Vector

How do you convert a Stokes vector into a Jones vector? I am only concerned about fully polarised light, and I need to convert the Stokes parameters (or the azimuth and ellipticity angles) as measured ...
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59 views

Do gravitational waves have field components like electromagnetic waves?

One way I've been led to understand electromagnetic waves (and I accept that this might be a misconception I have) is that they 'self propagate' through empty space by virtue of the wave consisting of ...
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80 views

Polarization of light - Malus's law

I have recently learnt about polarization of light and Malus's Law. Also, I have learnt that a single polaroid allows half of the intensity of light incident on it to pass through (assuming that the ...
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1answer
61 views

Charged particle/cosmic ray track on sunglasses

I left my (polarized) sunglasses on car dashboard .. . Returned, and immediately noticed a strongly lightened, partially dotted streak across entire left lens, cutting diagonally from "northwest" to ...
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29 views

Polka dot beamsplitter. Is it good for gaussian beams

I am doing pump probe and I am looking for beam-splitter which will not affect beam polarization too much, as I intend to measure polarization dependencies. I have heard of polka-dot beam-splitters ...
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Why is reflected light polarised?

Why is reflected light polarised? I have learnt about Brewster's angle, and how at a particular angle all light reflected is polarised, but do not understand why. Is this something that could be ...
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63 views

Ferromagnets - Permanent?

When researching about the Curie-Temperature and magnets in general, something got me confused. What is the difference between a ferromagnet and a permanent magnet? In a ferromagnet the spins are ...
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35 views

Polarisation effect due to reflection [closed]

By Malus' law we know that when an unpolarised light falls on a thin glass sheet, the light that gets reflected is polarised light as only the s-component (only 15%) is present with very low intensity ...
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47 views

Why does quantum mechanics produce different predictions for Bell test experiments than classical mechanics?

I understand that experimental results from Bell test experiments have shown that measured correlation is a cosine function of the angle between the detectors. What I am struggling to grasp is why ...
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47 views

Is the polarization of light changed by gravity?

The Gravitational_redshift shows, that the wavelength of light gets altered in a gravitational field. But what about polarization of light? I imagine that e.g. by tidal forces circular polarized light ...
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96 views

What is polarisation, spin, helicity, chirality and parity?

Polarisation, spin, helicity, chirality and parity keep confusing me. They seem to be related, but exactly how they are related is unclear to me. Can someone maybe give a short overview about what ...
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159 views

Linear polarized 3D glasses and the physical shape of light waves

Looking into how linear polarized 3D glasses work, I keep getting explanations that boil down to this: However, I always assumed that a light wave was depicted in diagrams like this... ...to more ...
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124 views

Does unpolarized light means that photon is in superposition state?

I read that a polaroid filter is made of many long chain of molecules aligned in one direction and will only allow the vibration of light with the same alignment as the filter to be absorbed. I ...
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Why does concentrated parahydrogen in hydrogenation reaction exhibit hyperpolarized signals in proton NMR spectra?

In wikipedia it says "When an excess of parahydrogen is used during hydrogenation reactions (instead of the normal mixture of orthohydrogen to parahydrogen of 3:1), the resultant product exhibits ...
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31 views

Can polarization occur if both charges are neutral?

If I keep neutral conductive pieces of some metal close to a neutral conductive sheet, what will happen? Will any of them get polarized or nothing will happen. My guess is nothing will happen as for ...
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What do the $T, E, B$ in polarization spectra mean?

I was reading about CMB Polarization here. I know that $E$ and $B$ stand for E-mode and B-mode, but what does the $T$ mean? The author states that there are 3 observables: $T, E, B$ and six spectra: ...
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3D glasses giving the opposite effect to that expected

I have just finished watching the new Star Wars movie (The Force Awakens), and during the end credits, text is shown upon a background of stars. Wearing the 3D glasses, I noticed that the text appears ...
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37 views

Is polarization a stable state?

Do a polarized light beam stays polarized over large distance or does it kind of relax and eventually become unpolarized?
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How polarized object's polarized atoms behaves like charge?

Electrical polarization is just the shifting of the constituent atoms' protons and electrons in opposite directions. This creates a bound charge, and this bound charge creates voltage and thus an ...
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Energy absorbed in Polarization of light

A polarizer absorbs all light that vibrates in a particular direction. Where does the energy absorbed by the "chain molecules" of the polarizer go? Does it change the structure of the molecules? Is ...
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41 views

Can we consider light from the Sun during sunrise and nightfall as polarised?

On sunrise and nightfall light looks different, more orange or more dark. Some frequencies are filtered or light travels longer. The energy corresponding to this light is obviously lower than light ...
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Recognizing linear or polarized light and seeing its direction

I was watching Walter Lewin's course, and he said he learned a way to see and recognize polarized or linear light. And i wonder what it might be? What is the tricks?
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67 views

Difference between twofold infinity and simple infinity in relation to quantum mechanics

$\newcommand{\k}[1]{\left | #1 \right\rangle }$ In his "The Principles of Quantum Mechanics", Paul Dirac states: $$c_1\k A + c_2 \k B = \k R$$ Given two states corresponding to the ket vectors ...
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Why does vertical polarizer absorb the vertically polarized waves?

They explain that vertical wires serve as the secondary transmitter: the waves induce since oscillations of electrons in the wire effectively absorbing the wave. Ok, let's believe that wave is ...
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What is the relation between charge and polarization?

On one hand, in this "Measurement of polarisation" lab manual, polarization is surface charge density, $P=\frac{Q}{A}$, in other words, charge an polarization are essentially the same thing. On the ...
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56 views

angular momentum of electromagnetic wave

EM waves that are circularly or elliptically polarized have angular momentum. Is there any experiment that proves/shows this ? like shine a light on something and it rotates ? The correspondence is ...
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53 views

What is the significance of 'energy ellipsoid'?

Well, today I was reading Tensors by Feynman in his lectures, where he introduced the concept of 'energy ellipsoid'. This is the following excerpt: [...] the polarization tensor can be measured ...
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Why does work done for polarization per unit volume contain $1\over 2$as in $\frac{1}{2} \mathbf E\cdot \mathbf P?$

Work done per unit volume to change the polarization from $0$ to $\bf P$ is given as the integral of $\mathbf E\cdot d\mathbf P'$ as $$u_p= \int_0^{\bf P}\mathbf E\cdot d\mathbf P' \;$$ integrating ...