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2
votes
2answers
67 views

Why is the speed of light exactly $299,792.458$ m/s and not faster or slower? [duplicate]

Why is the speed of light $299,792,458$ metres per second, and not faster or slower. Why not $500$ trillion kilometers per second or $120$ miles per hour? This has been 'bothering' me for a while. ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Why are physical “constants” constant?

I am really sorry if this question is inappropriate or wrong. But this is something that I can never perfectly agree with, it just keeps on striking my mind when I am studying something new in ...
14
votes
5answers
427 views

Is the Boltzmann constant really that important?

I read a book in which one chapter gave a speech about the fundamental constants of the Universe, and I remember it stated this: If the mass of an electron, the Planck constant, the speed of ...
-2
votes
1answer
65 views

Constancy of speed of light in vacuum? [closed]

Have scientists tried their best to calculate speed of light in vacuum? It seems very absurd to me that light of all frequencies have same velocity in space. Can someone find in future if this speed ...
0
votes
2answers
837 views

How can gravity truly be infinite?

From my knowledge, gravity is infinite and extends throughout all of space. It diminishes as distance increases but is still present everywhere. So given enough time, no matter where something is in ...
2
votes
1answer
184 views

Physical Significance of the Planck Density

The Planck density is the Planck mass devided by the Planck volume, approximately 1093 g/cm3. Does this quantity have any known physical relevance? The Planck mass is believed to be the smallest ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

What's the unit of fine-structure constant? [closed]

What's the unit of fine-structure constant? I mean in SI units.
2
votes
0answers
41 views

Can we alter/engineer natural “constants”? [closed]

There are numerous constants that define the physical universe, from the fine structure constant to Planck to the speed of light etc. Can any of these be altered locally? For example, it seems that ...
1
vote
2answers
113 views

Is there an equivalent of the Planck length for time?

Is there an equivalent of the Planck length for time? I'd just like a term I may use (high-level) for a similar "unit of time"? I am not looking for a debate on how discrete time might be, but if ...
1
vote
2answers
188 views

Why is the Fermi coupling constant always expressed in units of $(\hbar c)^3$?

Everywhere I've looked so far (such as NIST) the Fermi coupling constant $G_F$ is always expressed as $$\frac{G_F}{(\hbar c)^3} = 1.166 364(5) \times 10^{-5} \textrm{ GeV}^{-2}$$ never as just ...
6
votes
3answers
182 views

Can all laws of physics derived by a single or lists of more general laws?

(This is actually my first question - please understand my lack of knowledge and bad English..) I have always been curious about deriving thousands of laws from more general ones.. Can general laws ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

if there is Ideal Gas constant, then do we have real gas constant?

We have Ideal gas constant for ideal gases. But ideal gas is very hard to make or to be found. So we have real gases in nature. Now there is 'real gas equation' (also called 'Van Der Waal's equation') ...
20
votes
5answers
6k views

How to get Planck length

I know that what Planck length equals to. The first question is, how do you get the formula $$\ell_P~=~\sqrt\frac{\hbar G}{c^3}$$ that describes the Planck length? The second question is, will any ...
1
vote
3answers
269 views

Why do we obtain classical physics by taking the limit of Planck's constant to zero?

Why if we specifically set Planck's constant equal to zero (the limit of it) do we sometimes get classical physics? I mean, what does it mean physically to set the constant equal to zero? Or to say it ...
20
votes
4answers
4k views

What is so special about speed of light in vacuum?

I will try to be as explanatory as possible with my question. Please also note that I have done my share of googling and I am looking for simple language preferable with some example so that I can get ...
1
vote
5answers
112 views

What in nature causes Newton's gravitation constant to have it's given value?

Does the value of Newton's universal gravitational constant $G$ remain a mystery? Why does it have the value that it has?
-3
votes
1answer
180 views

Gravitational constant, $G$, What if it is not Constant?

The question is on title; What if Gravitational Constant, $G$, is not constant? Let's skip all the local consequences if it would suddenly change, like asked here; Can gravitational constant be ...
0
votes
0answers
70 views

Does rest mass increase in the FRW metric?

The flat FRW metric can be written in conformal co-ordinates: $$ds^2=a^2(\eta)(d\eta^2-dx^2-dy^2-dz^2)$$ where $\eta$ is conformal time. Let us assume that $a(\eta_0)=1$ when $\eta_0$ is the present ...
2
votes
1answer
323 views

Is there a relationship between the Cosmological constant and the Hubble constant?

I looked around to see if this precise question was asked before and it appears not to be. So is it just me or has anyone else noticed that, no matter what consistent set of units you use, $$ ...
0
votes
4answers
175 views

Why is the speed of light in vacuum what it is?

Three-pronged question on the speed of light. One: simply, do we know why the speed of light in a vacuum is what it is and why nothing is allowed to go faster? Two: if we knew why the speed of ...
8
votes
3answers
390 views

Why is Planck's constant the same for all particles?

This question came to me while reading Where does de Broglie wavelength $\lambda=h/p$ for massive particles come from? This question has a nice answer that explains that wave number has be ...
44
votes
3answers
6k views

Why should the Planck constant be a constant throughout all space?

Our value for the Planck constant $h$ can be found on experiments on Earth, but how do we know that the Planck constant doesn't change throughout space, for instance it depends weakly upon the ...
3
votes
5answers
738 views

The vacuum light speed: Is it really constant, i.e., independent of location in space-time?

I am by no means an expert in this field, however something puzzles me about the speed of light and the relativity of time and space (space-time). Is is universally acknowledged that the speed of ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Why are the classical electron radius, the Bohr radius and the Compton wavelength of an electron related to each other?

Using the definition of the fine-structure constant $\alpha = \frac{4 \pi \epsilon_0 \hbar c}{e^2}$ and the Compton wavelength of an electron $\lambda_c = \frac{h}{m_e c}$ the classical electron ...
15
votes
7answers
5k views

Why does the speed of light $c$ have the value it does? [duplicate]

Why does light have the speed it does? why is it not considerably faster or slower than it is? I can't imagine science, being what it is, not pursuing a rational scientific explanation for the speed ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What do physicists mean when they say “speed of light”?

Does it make sense to say, "The speed of light varies?" Some may say right off the bat "Yes, it changes as a wave passes through a different medium." However, I'd like to say no, because when I hear ...
9
votes
17answers
3k views

The origin of the value of speed of light in vacuum

Meaning, why is it the exact number that it is? Why not 2x10^8 m/s instead of 3? Does it have something to do with the mass, size or behavior of a photon? To be clear, I'm not asking "how we ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views
0
votes
2answers
38 views

What are the roles of physical constants in a relation expression?

To describe the properties of a system for which we have designed mathematical symbols and in relating these properties in an expression, we often introduce some proportionality constant. What is the ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Speed of light in vacuum - definition and Constancy [duplicate]

This question has been nagging me for sometimes now, and even after studying all those relativity still cannot find an appreciable answer. The speed of light is $c$ defined and measured as constant ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Gravity Relative to Mass?

Why is it that, in basic physics, it is taught that the acceleration of gravity is the same for objects of any mass (at a constant distance from earth)? Why then is the acceleration of gravity ...
6
votes
1answer
223 views

From which dimensionful constants does proton mass arise?

It is well known that the most of the proton (or any other hadron with light quarks) mass is not made up from quark masses, but it is dynamically generated by QCD mess inside. I've also heard that, ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Have I discovered how to calculate the proton's mass using only integers?

Could it be possible that the mass of the proton can be calculated by a series of integer sequences? Or is this just a curiosity? $$\sum_{m=1}^{\infty } \frac{1}{10^{26}(m^2+1)_{2m}}=$$ ...
48
votes
5answers
8k views

Dimensionless Constants in Physics

Forgive me if this topic is too much in the realm of philosophy. John Baez has an interesting perspective on the relative importance of dimensionless constants, which he calls fundamental like alpha, ...
-1
votes
2answers
572 views

Dimensional or dimensionless constant

While deriving new equations , how do theoretical physicists know whether the proportionality constant in their equation will be dimensional or dimensionless? I mean, say for example, we consider ...
-2
votes
1answer
65 views

What does the kilogram-hertz relationship stand for?

The value of the kilogram-hertz relationship [$(1kg)c^2/h]$ physics constant is 1.356 392 608 $\times 10^{50}\,\mathrm{Hz}$. What does this constant stand for?
17
votes
8answers
3k views

What is the proof that the universal constants ($G$, $\hbar$, $\ldots$) are really constant in time and space?

Cavendish measured the gravitation constant $G$, but actually he measured that constant on the Earth. What’s the proof that the value of the gravitation constant if measured on Neptune would remain ...
4
votes
1answer
285 views

How is “little $h$” measured in cosmology? The dimensionless parameter from the Hubble constant, $H_0$

Hubble's law has been well-know for close to a century now. It is written as $v = H_0 d$ where the Hubble constant $H_0$ is the constant of proportionality between recession speed $v$ and distance ...
-3
votes
3answers
176 views

Given the Newton constant $G$, the speed of light $c$ and the Planck constant $h$, construct an energy of the system [closed]

How do I use dimensional analysis to construct an energy for the system given the Newton constant $G$, the speed of light $c$ and the Planck constant $h$? I don't know of any energy formulas ...
3
votes
0answers
54 views

Experiment measuring vacuum permittivity and permeability in high speed

Suppose that we do NOT know anything of constancy of speed of light, to say nothing of special relativity. It is that we acquired a constant speed of light from Maxwell's Equations that we finally ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Would a Theory of Everything allow us to calculate the constants of physics?

I have heard several times in the past that a Theory of Everything would allow us to calculate (as opposed to measure) the fundamental dimensionless physical constants. What I mean is, e.g., the fine ...
-1
votes
2answers
108 views

Can anyone tell me the name of this constant?

I was watching a TV program about cosmology (I can't remember which or how old it was). In it, it mentioned a fundamental number (which I'm assuming is a constant, but that's not necessarily true). ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

What are some ways to measure variations in the speed of light in vacuum?

To avoid confusion, I am not talking about measuring differences in the speed of light in vacuum as a result of a particular Lorentz boost. What I mean is, suppose the "constant speed of light" were ...
-2
votes
2answers
437 views

Why is the speed of light limited to (only) 299.792.458 m/s? [closed]

The speed of light (in a vacuum) is limited to 299.792.458 m/s. This sounds very fast, and it is on a global scale. But if you look at the Universe on a larger scale than it sounds quite slow, For ...
2
votes
3answers
107 views

Does the accelerated rate of expansion of the Universe have any effect on the speed of light in vacuum?

So I was just wondering about this as I finished reading about Michelson-Morley's experiment which disproved the ether theory. My question is since the Universe is constantly expanding and that too ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Do we regularly measure and update our physical constants (By using the LHC)?

This question is motivated by sheer curiosity. I certainly do not expect that the free parameters we use in the standard model have changed in value since we started measuring them with a "modern" ...
8
votes
5answers
2k views

Is the speed of light in vacuum always the same value?

The escape velocity of different planets and stars vary. If they vary, the velocities of bodies escaping from the respective stars or planets should also vary. Like, if I want a ball to reach 10 ...
2
votes
2answers
460 views

Free parameters in the Standard Model

From my understanding of the standard model, I understand that there are 19 or 20 free parameters that we need to put in by hand as, and I'm guessing here, there is as yet no theoretical basis for ...