2
votes
1answer
69 views

Why do we say that the electric forces are stronger than gravitational forces? [duplicate]

May be I am asking a stupid question but I am very confused...I understand both forces are inversely proportional to the distances squared, and that the gravitational constant is roughly $10^{-20}$ ...
9
votes
1answer
339 views

Gravitational Constant in Newtonian Gravity vs. General Relativity

From my understanding, the gravitational constant $G$ is a proportionality constant used by Newton in his law of universal gravitation (which was based around Kepler's Laws), namely in the equation $F ...
7
votes
1answer
94 views

Is $4 \pi G$ the true most fundamental gravitational constant? [closed]

Newton's law of gravitation is: $$F = G m_1 m_2 \frac{1}{r^2}$$ It looks simple and natural. But that's only in 3 dimensions. Let's look what happens in $n$ dimensions: $$n=2 : F = 2 G m_1 m_2 ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

The physical interpretation of Newton's constant $G$

It is well known that the speed of light $c$ can be interpreted as the speed limit for information propagation. Similarly, the Planck's constant $h$ is interpreted as the minimum quantum package of ...
8
votes
1answer
436 views

Gravitational constant in higher dimensions?

From Newton's law of gravitation we know that $$F=G\frac{m_1m_2}{r^2}$$ where $G$ is gravitational constant. We can also see that it has dimensions $$[G]=\frac{[L]^3}{[M][T]^2}$$ and we have a ...
3
votes
5answers
297 views

Is the gravitational constant $G$ a fundamental universal constant?

Is the gravitational constant $G$ a fundamental universal constant like Planck constant $h$ and the speed of light $c$?
7
votes
3answers
315 views

why there is no accuracy of the measured value of $G$?

With the advancement of Modern Technology still there is no accuracy of the measured value of $G$ Gravitational Constant, why!?
10
votes
7answers
1k views

What is the proof that the universal constants ($G$, $\hbar$, $\ldots$) are really constant in time and space?

Cavendish measured the gravitation constant $G$, but actually he measured that constant on the Earth. What’s the proof that the value of the gravitation constant if measured on Neptune would remain ...
6
votes
1answer
607 views

Why can you remove the gravitational constant from a computer game simulation?

I've seen in a few gravity simulation games (ie. bouncing balls) the equation: force = G * m1 * m2 / distance^2 shortened to this by removing the gravitational ...