"Photon" is the name given to particles of light in the quantum mechanical understanding. In interaction where the classical and quantum mechanical understandings of light agree they are fully equivalent to electromagnetic waves.

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How do photons carry information?

In cosmology it's frequently said that photons from the early universe carry information from that time. However, wouldn't they also carry data from later interactions? How do we differentiate ...
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Isn't the Coulomb interaction a photon interaction between two charges?

Isn't the Coulomb interaction a photon interaction between two charges? if yes then what does the following text mean? (Many-particle Physics by Gerald D. Mahan.)
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How does the flow of photons (qty/s) vary across the spectrum? (In everyday life)

Humans see only a narrow band of light wavelengths. Many animals see much deeper into infrared. Maybe one clue to explain why we don't see IR naturally, has to do with the light intensity as a ...
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Is my calcualtion from the mass of a photon right? [on hold]

The Mass off a Photon The right format can be found here: Photon E = hv E = mc2 E = av (amplitude, frequency) m = hv/c2 Mass = movement of electromagnetic fields Planck’s constant = electromagnetic ...
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What exactly is a quantum of light?

I am currently trying to learn some basic quantum mechanics and I am a bit confused. Wikipedia defines a photon as a quantum of light, which it further explains as some kind of a wave-packet. What ...
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154 views

Why does light not slow down?

Clearly light bounces off of things, going really really fast. I'm curious to understand how light interacts with matter in order to bounce without: Applying force to the object Losing speed So my ...
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How are photons made?

I mean in manufacturing a bicycle we know how to "ensemble" a bicycle, what actions and "assembly of parts". So what steps are needed for make a photon? Also is there a limit on how many photons for ...
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Are electron fields and photon fields part of the same field in QED?

I know in classical field theory we have the electromagnetic field. And Maxwell's equations show how electromagnetic radiation can propagate through empty space. I also have been reading about QED ...
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How can spacetime affect massless entities? [duplicate]

Why is light affected and "bent" by spacetime if it has no mass or density?
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Why does light travel as waves? [duplicate]

Why does light travel as waves instead of say just a straight line? What are the forces that make a light photon travel in a wavelike pattern?
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Is this “classical model of the photon” real?

I do not know how to phrase the question better but this article claims to have a classical model of the photon. Has this (rather extraordinary) claim been verified? Here is an extract from the link ...
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Does this experiment on wave-particle duality and complementarity disprove quantum mechanics and prove the EPR viewpoint on it?

I recently read Photons act like they go through two paths, even when we know which they took, at Ars Technica, which reports on the paper Wave-particle dualism and complementarity unraveled ...
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How far back can you trace a photon?

You have a photomultiplier tube pointed at a distant star, exactly 100 light years away. It's perfectly set up so that nothing can get into the tube unless it came from that star. Every hour or so, ...
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Is it possible that galaxies' redshift is caused by something else than the expansion of space?

I was thinking that maybe photons loss energy naturally when they travel great distances. Or maybe the mass of all matter is increasing over time and therefore photons emitted in the past are ...
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Why is photon annihilation associated with the POSITIVE frequency component of the electric field?

I'm reading Glauber's paper "The quantum theory of optical coherence". In his work he does not introduce the annihilation and creation operators, but he refers instead to the positive and negative ...
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Question about electron-hole pair generation in depletion layer for a p-n junction photodiode

At the heart of operation of p-n (or p-i-n) junction photodiodes is the absorption of photons leading to generation of electron-hole pairs. If the diode is, e.g., reverse biased, then the motion of ...
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Why would a photon striking an electron “make both recoil”? [duplicate]

Why would a photon striking an electron "make both recoil" as I read in an answer to another question. If the photon is massless, how can it make an electron change momentum?
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Holding a photolithography mask (EUV litography) with magnets, to minimize deformation on the photomask?

Some background: what is this question about? On 20/11/2014, I visited the ASML Holding in the Netherlands, which is according to them, and according to Wikipedia: the largest supplier in the ...
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What is a photon? [duplicate]

I'm trying to get a definitive and clear answer to the question of what a photon actually is. Textbooks seem to give quite vague explanations, all starting with Einstein's idea that a quanta is a form ...
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How many x-ray photons would penetrate an aluminum sheet of 2 cm thickness? [closed]

1000 x-ray photons of energy 200 keV strike a sheet of aluminum 1 cm thick. 718 of the photons penetrate it. How many (of 1000 incident photons) would penetrate an aluminum sheet of 2 cm ...
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Describing a single photon with creation and annihilation operators

Since I am not fully aware of the creation and annihilation operator formalism for single photons, I want to ask, if the following is correct: I am considering a photon in the vacuum which travel ...
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43 views

Photons and gravity [duplicate]

A very powerful laser pointing to the empty space next to small object in space. The photons in the laser beam does not hit the object. Will the small object be gravitationally affected by that laser ...
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How can absorption spectra form if atoms can't remain in an excited state?

I have been tasked to write a research paper on stars. However, I know very little about physics in general. I am learning about how we can glean information about stars by analyzing the light that ...
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relation between photon number and energy

Suppose there are two light beams. One is red while the other is violet. The energy of both is the same. Which one of these beams has a larger number of photons, or is the number of photons relevant? ...
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At what angle does a single atom “reflect” a single photon?

Does this question make sense in the quantum world? Imagining a single photon (wave packet?) interacting with a single atom (its electrons etc) how do we currently describe/define the emitted photon ...
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Would this Produce Thrust? (Photon Momentum, Speed of a Pressure Wave)

This thought occurred to me after I began reading about the EM drive, and I know there are a lot of theories out there on how that works/doesn't work, I'm wondering why this solution wouldn't make ...
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What do ants see?

After watching some ants in my garden today, and then looking at this very illuminating demonstration, I got to wondering, about what they would see. Not specifically ants (I understand their ...
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Is a photon technically a set of two particles?

When looking at the classification of massless particles, one finds that there is the (half-integer) quantum number "helicity" $h$. For every possible $h$ there is a certain particle kind. In the case ...
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Number of different wavelengths in the visible spectrum reaching Earth

I recognize the visible wavelengths of light extend from approximately 400 - 700 nm. But how many different wavelengths exist in that range? 300 ? 30,000 ? (400.01 - 699.99) If it's completely ...
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Relation between number of photons and energy?

Please can anyone explain it. If number of photons are increased will it increase the providing energy. Suppose, we are sending a limited number of photons each carrying energy. We have a energy ...
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Does light have a gravitational pull? [duplicate]

I understand that everything with mass does have a gravitational pull no matter how small the object, which means even a grain of sand has a gravitational pull. But light is something that exists, ...
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Can a photon get emitted without a receiver?

It is generally agreed upon that electromagnetic waves from an emitter does not have to connect to a receiver, but how can we be sure this is a fact? The problem is that we can never observe non ...
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Quantum Eraser thought experiment with light photons of distinct color

I tried to recreate the Quantum Eraser experiment into a thought experiment with a few changes. It left me a little perplexed as to what outcomes I should expect. Any help would be appreciated. Lets ...
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Photoelectric Effect - How are the electrons regained?

When the photons with enough energy impinge on a photocathode, it emits electrons. Does this mean that the solid will lose all its electron at one point? If not, how are electrons restored?
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What is the speed of a Photon? [duplicate]

How fast does a Photon travel through space? And is gravity able to influence a Photon's path?
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where does the kinetic energy of electron revolving in nucleus go when photoelectric effect takes place?

we all have been studying that when photon is incident on alkali metal surface, photo currents are created due to ejection of electron after exceeding the work function.but the electron do have ...
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How can a photon have a frequency but not a phase?

When a single photon is emitted as a result of relaxation of an electronic energy level, it (the field) is clearly in a Fock state because it has a well-defined number of quanta. By the uncertainty ...
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Calculation of energy deposit of photon beam

Let's say I shoot a 1 MeV photon beam onto a volume. I want to know the ratio of deposited dose per path length for different materials (water and air) at a certain position (e.g. x=0) in the volume. ...
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Local EPR-experiments with photons in vacuum?

The principle of non-locality states "that an object is influenced directly only by its immediate surroundings." (Wikipedia) When two entangled particles are measured in an EPR experiment, we ...
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Laser beam sensed by scattering

Can a laser beam, whether it is a IR laser or of the visible to human eye spectrum, be seen/sensed by an electronic eye like a photosensor/photodetector, not human eye, if the beam is just in air? For ...
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How hot is your photon?

This question comes from my answer to the question Can a cubic meter of space at absolute zero have any object with mass inside? and the related discussion under it. To summarize, I stated that the ...
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Why is the $S_{z} =0$ state forbidden for photons?

If photons are spin-1 bosons, then doesn't quantum mechanics imply that the allowed values for the z-component of spin (in units of $\hbar$) are -1, 0, and 1? Why then in practice do we only use the ...
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Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?

Lamb 1969 states, A misconception which most physicists acquire in their formative years is that the photoelectric effect requires the quantization of the electromagnetic field for its ...
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Gamma photon excitation of electron

Can a single high energy photon excite more than one electron in an atom?
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Laser beam photon counting

I'd like to know if devices exist that are able to detect the single photon missing out of a normal laser beam. I am aware of the fact that single photon counters do exist, but I'd like to ask some ...
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Can someone reconcile the Boltzmann transport equation with the Maxwell equations for photons/light?

Having taking courses in both physics and nuclear engineering, I've noticed that the two fields tend to describe photons/light in two different settings. In nuclear engineering, the radiative ...
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Output of a beamsplitter with photon number (Fock) state inputs

Given a beamsplitter drawn below, where $\hat{a}$ and $\hat{b}$ are input modal annihilation operators, transmissivity is $\tau\in[0,1]$, and output modal annihilation operators are ...
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Do Photons Move in a Wave Like Pattern [duplicate]

In many pieces of literature, light is said to travel like a "wave". Does this mean the light literally propagates through space like a wave as in up and down and so on or does light move linearly ...
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Photon propagation direction prediction possible after interacting with neutral hydrogen?

My current line of research deals a lot with hydrogen's Lyman-alpha emission and subsequent interactions of the Lyman-alpha photons with the surrounding hydrogen gas. My question is whether ...
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The path that light travels [duplicate]

This is a question that has puzzled me for some time. As a star emits light, the light travels away from the star. If you were to pick any spot on the star and draw a line extending outwards and then ...