"Photon" is the name given to particles of light in the quantum mechanical understanding. In interaction where the classical and quantum mechanical understandings of light agree they are fully equivalent to electromagnetic waves.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
0answers
51 views

In the Pound-Rebka experiment, does light lose energy?

In the Pound–Rebka experiment the redshift / blueshift of photons is measured in small distances. This experiment one explain by the influence of gravitational field on the photon: "When the photon ...
0
votes
4answers
315 views

Faster-than-$c$ photons

As far as I know, according to quantum field theory, there are some photons that go faster than c, which is the speed of light in vacuum. However, there seems to be a paper and a corresponding ...
2
votes
4answers
302 views

Local EPR-experiments with photons in vacuum?

The principle of non-locality states "that an object is influenced directly only by its immediate surroundings." (Wikipedia) When two entangled particles are measured in an EPR experiment, we ...
6
votes
4answers
167 views

Difference between spin and polarization of a photon

I understand how one associates the spin of a quantum particle, e.g. of a photon, with intrinsic angular momentum. And in electromagnetism I have always understood the polarization of an EM wave as ...
2
votes
3answers
43 views

Is photon direction affected by a strong electric field?

Is photon direction affected by a strong electric field? Just like gravity pulls light?.
4
votes
2answers
110 views

What's the connection between the spin of the photon and the polarisation of light?

In view of wave-particle duality, the spin of the photon must have a counterpart in the wave picture: is this polarisation?
0
votes
1answer
34 views

In which direction due to a polarizing grid the photon's electric field is oriented?

After a photon passes the slit, is it's electric field oriented perpendicular or parallel to the slit and why this is so?
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Mass of photon, is it possible? [duplicate]

$P=E/C$ In relativistic mechanics a Photon is defined as. $P=hf/C$ Replacing "P" $ mc=hf/C$ $M=h/CT$ What does it mean, did they have mass?
2
votes
3answers
1k views

How is electromagnetic wave variation distributed in space?

Imagine an electromagnetic wave (a monochromatic one for example). The electric field amplitude and its variations travel in the propagation direction. So, if there really exists a propagation ...
1
vote
5answers
1k views

Why can't “missing mass” (=dark matter) be photons?

After a star lives and dies, I assume virtually all of its mass would be photons. If enough stars have already lived and died, couldn’t there be enough photon energy out there to account for all ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Photon walk in stars with convection

I'm having trouble figuring this out. I've read, that when photons are created via nuclear processes inside a star, it can take about 1 million years for photons to actually reach the surface of a ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Non-polarised light

We know the beam of light oscillates in electric field and magnetic field, both perpendicular to both the wave of propagation and each other. What does, however, a non-polarised beam of light look ...
0
votes
2answers
43 views

Linear polarization measurement - what QM observable is measured?

My understanding is that photon can have spin +-1 along propagation direction, corresponding to two circular polarizations. Linear polarization is superposition of two. Since one can measure linear ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Describing a single photon with creation and annihilation operators

Since I am not fully aware of the creation and annihilation operator formalism for single photons, I want to ask, if the following is correct: I am considering a photon in the vacuum which travel ...
9
votes
3answers
814 views

How can we interpret polarization and frequency when we are dealing with one single photon?

If polarization is interpreted as a pattern/direction of the electric-field in an electromagnetic wave and the frequency as the frequency of oscillation, how can we interpret polarization and ...
2
votes
2answers
772 views

What is the real interpretation of Planck's constant and what are its origins?

In the physics texts I have read and from other online information, I gather that Planck's constant is the quantum of action or that it is a constant specifying the ratio of the energy of a particle ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

What does a completely negative Greens function in frequency mean?

What can a Greens function of frequency mean when it is always negative? The Greens function is for the photons as the following: (It's derived by Matsubara method to enter the thermal effects and the ...
1
vote
2answers
91 views

can we detect the photons in the interaction of two charged bodies?

if the interaction of two charged bodies is through the photon exchange: 1) how much is the energy of these photons and how do we calculate their energies? 2) can these photons be detected by a photon ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

Isn't the Coulomb interaction a photon interaction between two charges?

Isn't the Coulomb interaction a photon interaction between two charges? if yes then what does the following text mean? (Many-particle Physics by Gerald D. Mahan.)
4
votes
2answers
95 views

Do virtual photons have a frequency?

Real photons do have frequencies, which is directly related to its energy. So, can virtual photons that take part in EM interactions have frequencies too? When my hand is pressed up against a glass ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

High photon flux for ultrashort photons?

What is currently the highest photon flux one can achieve for single photons with a coherence length of femtoseconds? Does some know roughly know the order of magnitude? Unfortunately I was not very ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Transfer of electron energy to atoms (heating up of matter by absorption of photons)

If an electron absorbs a photon to get exited to a higher energy level, it should either come back to same state or any other lower state by emitting the required photon. How then can there be a net ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

How can the 'choice' of a photon said to be delayed?

My question arises from two ideas that seem to be contradictory. Idea One: Wheeler's Delayed Choice experiment is an interesting variation of the double slit experiment. Idea Two: In the "reference ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Do twice more atoms absorb twice more photons?

Let's assume you have a photon detector that detect individual photons striking it when exposed to a weak light source. Now let's assume you somehow managed to make a denser detector from the same ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Spin statistic in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

In a spontaneous parametric down-conversion a photon will be converted into two photons with half energy and correlated polarization. How the spin from the ingoing photon will be transfered to the ...
3
votes
2answers
68 views

Is $\phi_n =\left\langle \vec r | n \right\rangle $ the photon wave function?

I am a bit confused about this issue and I am still not clear whether is there is a photon wave function or not. Since we use Fock states $| n \rangle$ to represent the state of a quantized ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Photoelectric Effect - How are the electrons regained?

When the photons with enough energy impinge on a photocathode, it emits electrons. Does this mean that the solid will lose all its electron at one point? If not, how are electrons restored?
0
votes
3answers
111 views

Would this Produce Thrust? (Photon Momentum, Speed of a Pressure Wave)

This thought occurred to me after I began reading about the EM drive, and I know there are a lot of theories out there on how that works/doesn't work, I'm wondering why this solution wouldn't make ...
0
votes
2answers
70 views

How far back can you trace a photon?

You have a photomultiplier tube pointed at a distant star, exactly 100 light years away. It's perfectly set up so that nothing can get into the tube unless it came from that star. Every hour or so, ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

What is the principle behind the use of one LASER for optical pumping of Rubidium in presence of magnetic field?

How can we use a single LASER for optical pumping of rubidium in the presence of magnetic field as the zeeman levels are degenerate in the presence of magnetic field and how to decide upon the ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Mechanism of pair production and annihilation of matter

Pair production is where an energetic photon on its interaction with strong electric field surrounding a nucleus produces an electron-positron pair. Annihilation is its converse where an ...
4
votes
1answer
560 views

How does a particle of light reach the max speed of light? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can a photon have no mass and still travel at the speed of light? First of all I am not a professional physicist. I was curious as to how a particle of light can ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Is my representation of $\varphi$ Work function correct?

I am a middle-school so my understanding of physics may not be as solid as you professional physicists but never the less thought its worth a try to learn more. I read about photo-electric effect by ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

photon absorption and emission

I was reading a book (Sears Zemansky) about this subject but I didn't understand something of an example, and this is that according to me there should be a process of emission for each of absorption ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

If photons don't have charge, why are they deflected by charged black holes?

If photons don't have charge, why are they deflected by charged black holes? According to quantum electrodynamics, photons don't have electric or magnetic fields either.
0
votes
2answers
23 views

Red shifted photons lost energy in which form?

Red shifted photons lost energy in which form? Photons which have experienced a change in frequency (red shift) due to gravity(or other red shifting affects), have necessarily lost energy, total ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Do like charges separating by a small distance release a photon?

I believe from earlier physics that an electron moving from higher to a lower potential (e.g. higher energy state to a lower) can release a photon. Given two like charges -- two electrons for example ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Does the absence of a sound particle indicate that there are no photons?

Sound is usually referred to as just "sound waves" - we do not talk about a "sound particle" and only as a wave or "matter wave." Could something similar apply to light i.e. that there really is no ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Differential cross section for photon scattering on fixed magnetic dipole

Photon with energy $\hbar\omega$ scattering on a fixed particle with magnetic momentum $\vec{\mu} = \mu \vec s$. How to calculate a differential and total cross section for the photon. I've found in ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

How does gravity bend light [duplicate]

Assuming photons have no mass, as I believe they don't, how does gravity affect photons in order to bend them?
0
votes
2answers
39 views

Can a two-levels photon pair be created either entangled or not entangled? [closed]

I am learning about experiments on Quantum Optics and Quantum Tomography in order to understand how to measure two qubits with an arbitrary quantum state of their polarization degrees of freedom. ...
2
votes
3answers
153 views

How do two electrical charged particles know to repel or attract each other?

Now per QED, electrical charges interactions are effected by photons. Suppose you are one of the two charges. How do you know to attract or repel the other charge? In other words, how do you know if ...
1
vote
3answers
162 views

Photons straight into black hole

What happens to a photon shot straight into a black hole? Does it gain infinite momentum before it crosses the horizon? If it has a finite momentum going in, then it would seem that a photon of the ...
5
votes
2answers
804 views

Is the de Broglie wavelength of a photon equal to the EM wavelength of the radiation?

Is the de Broglie (matter) wavelength $\lambda=\frac{h}{p}$ of a photon equal to the electromagnetic wavelength of the radiation? I guess yes, but how come that photons have both a matter wave and an ...
3
votes
2answers
420 views

Difference between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and Electromagnetic Field?

I'm a freshly graduated electrical engineer. One course that I really struggled with was Field Theory, because it was a lovely assortment of vector calculus and things that were explained to me well ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Recoil from a photon gun

Suppose you have a laser gun or a gun that shoots high frequency photons. Now according to Newton's laws there should be an equal and opposite reaction. So the question is - Will there be a recoil ...
1
vote
2answers
94 views

Quantum Eraser thought experiment with light photons of distinct color

I tried to recreate the Quantum Eraser experiment into a thought experiment with a few changes. It left me a little perplexed as to what outcomes I should expect. Any help would be appreciated. Lets ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Smallest Wavelength of light possible? [duplicate]

I was thinking about blue-shifting of light and I couldn't help my self but think about the limits of blue shifting mechanism and since we know energy of a photon is directly proportional to the ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

Does the work function of metal depend upon the intensity of light?

does work function of metal depend upon the intensity of light?or does it depend upon the nature of metal?And according to my perception its depend upon both intensity and nature of light.
2
votes
3answers
275 views

How noisy are photon detectors?

I have a single photon detector and $N$ photons per second arrive at the detector. Then something happens and the number of incoming photons per second changes by the factor of $\alpha$. So now ...