The photon is the quantum of the electromagnetic four-potential, and therefore the massless bosonic particle associated with the electromagnetic force, commonly also called the "particle of light". Use this tag for questions about the quantum-mechanical understanding of light and/or electromagnetic ...

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66 views

Do light particle/waves have a frequency? [duplicate]

I sought the answer to the question about amplitude of light waves first, but I was actually thinking about whether the wavelength is the only property of a single quanta of light. I suppose direction ...
6
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0answers
275 views

Have they really photographed light behaving both as a particle and a wave?

I just came across this article where they are claiming that they have photographed light behaving both as a wave and a particle! The paper has been published in Nature Communications and I read the ...
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2answers
385 views

Compton scattering multiple wavelengths?

The formula given for compton scattering shows that when x-ray of one specific wavelength hits carbon or some materials, emitted x-ray will be of one new specific wavelength. However, according to ...
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0answers
34 views

Why does the 'many paths' of a photon theory work? [duplicate]

Posted this on reddit a day ago, and I'm still struggling to grasp the concept explained to me in physics class:/ Following the explanation from this link: ...
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5answers
1k views

Why can't “missing mass” (=dark matter) be photons?

After a star lives and dies, I assume virtually all of its mass would be photons. If enough stars have already lived and died, couldn’t there be enough photon energy out there to account for all ...
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2answers
101 views

Explain the notion of light/electromagnetic waves/photons to a non-physicist

A non-physicist asked me about special relativity. My explanations naturally were based on gedankenexperiments involving light. This forced the question: "What is light? It is particles, isn't? Or is ...
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1answer
67 views

If photon-photon interactions are impossible, how are higher harmonics generated?

In nonlinear optics, it is a rather common process to use nonlinear materials to produce higher harmonics of an incident wave. About the mechanism of the generation of such higher harmonics, it is ...
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1answer
26 views

Can an electron which is a bound in an atom absorb more than one photon at the same time? [duplicate]

Can an electron which is a bound in an atom absorb more than one photon at the same time ? In specific during photo-electric emission can an electron take in more than one photon if one photon doesn't ...
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2answers
66 views

What happens to photons that get trapped in a black holes event horizon?

So, I know that photons do not travel fast enough to escape a black hole once it passes the event horizon. Also, I know that the photons themselves aren't affected by the gravity, but rather their ...
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0answers
26 views

Entangled Photon (laser pointer)

From a laser pointer emission; is it creating entangled pairs of photon? is it possible to get more than "pair" entangled, like group of photons all entangled?
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0answers
31 views

Is this fine to think of light as the following? [on hold]

Is light quantums (increments [photons]) of the electromagnetic waves which are synchronized by oscillations of electromagnetic fields
2
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1answer
17 views

Can a fluorophore emit a higher energy photon than it absorbed

It is unclear for me what processes are exactly in place during the absorption-reemission process of a fluorescing photon. I am thinking about the case when the absorption and emission spectrum ...
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1answer
60 views

Is it possible to give photons an electric charge?

I know that photons have no electric charge and that they are stable, but is it possible to give them a positive or negative charge? If so how?
3
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1answer
77 views

How do photons carry information?

In cosmology it's frequently said that photons from the early universe carry information from that time. However, wouldn't they also carry data from later interactions? How do we differentiate ...
2
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1answer
120 views

Isn't the Coulomb interaction a photon interaction between two charges?

Isn't the Coulomb interaction a photon interaction between two charges? if yes then what does the following text mean? (Many-particle Physics by Gerald D. Mahan.)
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1answer
19 views

How does the flow of photons (qty/s) vary across the spectrum? (In everyday life)

Humans see only a narrow band of light wavelengths. Many animals see much deeper into infrared. Maybe one clue to explain why we don't see IR naturally, has to do with the light intensity as a ...
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1answer
41 views

Is my calcualtion from the mass of a photon right? [closed]

The Mass off a Photon The right format can be found here: Photon E = hv E = mc2 E = av (amplitude, frequency) m = hv/c2 Mass = movement of electromagnetic fields Planck’s constant = electromagnetic ...
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3answers
10k views

What exactly is a quantum of light?

I am currently trying to learn some basic quantum mechanics and I am a bit confused. Wikipedia defines a photon as a quantum of light, which it further explains as some kind of a wave-packet. What ...
2
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1answer
157 views

Why does light not slow down?

Clearly light bounces off of things, going really really fast. I'm curious to understand how light interacts with matter in order to bounce without: Applying force to the object Losing speed So my ...
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3answers
111 views

How are photons made?

I mean in manufacturing a bicycle we know how to "ensemble" a bicycle, what actions and "assembly of parts". So what steps are needed for make a photon? Also is there a limit on how many photons for ...
2
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2answers
126 views

Are electron fields and photon fields part of the same field in QED?

I know in classical field theory we have the electromagnetic field. And Maxwell's equations show how electromagnetic radiation can propagate through empty space. I also have been reading about QED ...
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0answers
46 views

How can spacetime affect massless entities? [duplicate]

Why is light affected and "bent" by spacetime if it has no mass or density?
0
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2answers
81 views

Why does light travel as waves? [duplicate]

Why does light travel as waves instead of say just a straight line? What are the forces that make a light photon travel in a wavelike pattern?
3
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0answers
86 views

Is this “classical model of the photon” real?

I do not know how to phrase the question better but this article claims to have a classical model of the photon. Has this (rather extraordinary) claim been verified? Here is an extract from the link ...
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1answer
638 views

Does this experiment on wave-particle duality and complementarity disprove quantum mechanics and prove the EPR viewpoint on it?

I recently read Photons act like they go through two paths, even when we know which they took, at Ars Technica, which reports on the paper Wave-particle dualism and complementarity unraveled ...
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3answers
110 views

How far back can you trace a photon?

You have a photomultiplier tube pointed at a distant star, exactly 100 light years away. It's perfectly set up so that nothing can get into the tube unless it came from that star. Every hour or so, ...
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5answers
167 views

Is it possible that galaxies' redshift is caused by something else than the expansion of space?

I was thinking that maybe photons loss energy naturally when they travel great distances. Or maybe the mass of all matter is increasing over time and therefore photons emitted in the past are ...
2
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1answer
150 views

Why is photon annihilation associated with the POSITIVE frequency component of the electric field?

I'm reading Glauber's paper "The quantum theory of optical coherence". In his work he does not introduce the annihilation and creation operators, but he refers instead to the positive and negative ...
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1answer
19 views

Question about electron-hole pair generation in depletion layer for a p-n junction photodiode

At the heart of operation of p-n (or p-i-n) junction photodiodes is the absorption of photons leading to generation of electron-hole pairs. If the diode is, e.g., reverse biased, then the motion of ...
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1answer
19 views

Why would a photon striking an electron “make both recoil”? [duplicate]

Why would a photon striking an electron "make both recoil" as I read in an answer to another question. If the photon is massless, how can it make an electron change momentum?
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0answers
14 views

Holding a photolithography mask (EUV litography) with magnets, to minimize deformation on the photomask?

Some background: what is this question about? On 20/11/2014, I visited the ASML Holding in the Netherlands, which is according to them, and according to Wikipedia: the largest supplier in the ...
2
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3answers
95 views

What is a photon? [duplicate]

I'm trying to get a definitive and clear answer to the question of what a photon actually is. Textbooks seem to give quite vague explanations, all starting with Einstein's idea that a quanta is a form ...
2
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2answers
97 views

Describing a single photon with creation and annihilation operators

Since I am not fully aware of the creation and annihilation operator formalism for single photons, I want to ask, if the following is correct: I am considering a photon in the vacuum which travel ...
0
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0answers
43 views

Photons and gravity [duplicate]

A very powerful laser pointing to the empty space next to small object in space. The photons in the laser beam does not hit the object. Will the small object be gravitationally affected by that laser ...
4
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1answer
47 views

How can absorption spectra form if atoms can't remain in an excited state?

I have been tasked to write a research paper on stars. However, I know very little about physics in general. I am learning about how we can glean information about stars by analyzing the light that ...
0
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1answer
75 views

relation between photon number and energy

Suppose there are two light beams. One is red while the other is violet. The energy of both is the same. Which one of these beams has a larger number of photons, or is the number of photons relevant? ...
3
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1answer
499 views

At what angle does a single atom “reflect” a single photon?

Does this question make sense in the quantum world? Imagining a single photon (wave packet?) interacting with a single atom (its electrons etc) how do we currently describe/define the emitted photon ...
0
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3answers
146 views

Would this Produce Thrust? (Photon Momentum, Speed of a Pressure Wave)

This thought occurred to me after I began reading about the EM drive, and I know there are a lot of theories out there on how that works/doesn't work, I'm wondering why this solution wouldn't make ...
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4answers
30k views

What do ants see?

After watching some ants in my garden today, and then looking at this very illuminating demonstration, I got to wondering, about what they would see. Not specifically ants (I understand their ...
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1answer
957 views

Is a photon technically a set of two particles?

When looking at the classification of massless particles, one finds that there is the (half-integer) quantum number "helicity" $h$. For every possible $h$ there is a certain particle kind. In the case ...
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2answers
36 views

Number of different wavelengths in the visible spectrum reaching Earth

I recognize the visible wavelengths of light extend from approximately 400 - 700 nm. But how many different wavelengths exist in that range? 300 ? 30,000 ? (400.01 - 699.99) If it's completely ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Relation between number of photons and energy?

Please can anyone explain it. If number of photons are increased will it increase the providing energy. Suppose, we are sending a limited number of photons each carrying energy. We have a energy ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Does light have a gravitational pull? [duplicate]

I understand that everything with mass does have a gravitational pull no matter how small the object, which means even a grain of sand has a gravitational pull. But light is something that exists, ...
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5answers
1k views

Can a photon get emitted without a receiver?

It is generally agreed upon that electromagnetic waves from an emitter does not have to connect to a receiver, but how can we be sure this is a fact? The problem is that we can never observe non ...
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1answer
111 views

Quantum Eraser thought experiment with light photons of distinct color

I tried to recreate the Quantum Eraser experiment into a thought experiment with a few changes. It left me a little perplexed as to what outcomes I should expect. Any help would be appreciated. Lets ...
0
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1answer
102 views

Photoelectric Effect - How are the electrons regained?

When the photons with enough energy impinge on a photocathode, it emits electrons. Does this mean that the solid will lose all its electron at one point? If not, how are electrons restored?
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1answer
63 views

What is the speed of a Photon? [duplicate]

How fast does a Photon travel through space? And is gravity able to influence a Photon's path?
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1answer
26 views

where does the kinetic energy of electron revolving in nucleus go when photoelectric effect takes place?

we all have been studying that when photon is incident on alkali metal surface, photo currents are created due to ejection of electron after exceeding the work function.but the electron do have ...
3
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1answer
80 views

How can a photon have a frequency but not a phase?

When a single photon is emitted as a result of relaxation of an electronic energy level, it (the field) is clearly in a Fock state because it has a well-defined number of quanta. By the uncertainty ...
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0answers
16 views

Calculation of energy deposit of photon beam

Let's say I shoot a 1 MeV photon beam onto a volume. I want to know the ratio of deposited dose per path length for different materials (water and air) at a certain position (e.g. x=0) in the volume. ...