The photon is the quantum of the electromagnetic four-potential, and therefore the massless bosonic particle associated with the electromagnetic force, commonly also called the "particle of light". Use this tag for questions about the quantum-mechanical understanding of light and/or electromagnetic ...

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Can Light Waves Be Irregular?

From what I understand, electromagnetic radiation produced by an antenna is of the frequency that corresponds to the motion of the electrons moving around in the antenna. And I assume that the ...
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How to evaluate possible values of spin of two photon system?

Photon hasn't well defined quantity such as spin. Instead of it, it is characterized by helicity $h$. Let's assume state of two photons in CM frame (with $\mathbf k$ being the momentum of one of ...
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If the four velocity of a photon is undefined, what can we say about the velocity of a photon? Is Brian Greene right about motion through spacetime? [on hold]

Edit: THIS QUESTION IS ASKING ABOUT THE FOUR VELOCITY OF A PHOTON. THE PREVIOUS QUESTION DOES NOT. PLEASE ANSWER THIS QUESTION, WHICH HAS NOT BEEN ASKED. If the four velocity of a photon is ...
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4answers
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If a photon has no mass why doesn't it have infinite speed? [duplicate]

Please help a naïve layperson understand -- if a photon has no mass, why is its velocity limited at all? Shouldn't a particle with no mass be able to travel at an infinite speed?
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Energy loss of photons crossing a dielectric medium

How much energy do photons lose when crossing an "isotropic" dielectric medium? What would be possible mechanisms. I assume the straight forward answer would be that the photon loses zero energy and ...
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Firing Single Photon [on hold]

We know (or pretend to know) what will happen if we fire one photon at a time and let it pass through slit/slits. But what if we don't use slit/slits and fire photons one at a time at a screen? What ...
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Why don't photons split up into multiple lower energy versions of themselves?

A photon could spontaneously split up into two or more versions of itself and all the conservation laws I'm aware of would not be violated by this process. (I think.) I've given this some thought, and ...
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If electromagnetic fields give charge to particles, do photons carry charge?

As I understand these two statements: An electromagnetic field gives particles charge A photon is a quantum of electromagnetic field It must mean that a photon carries charge. But I guess it isn't ...
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2answers
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Do protons exchange photons with electrons?

I'm sorry for this question but, I just don't get it. According to the electromagnetic field theory, electrons repel each other by exchanging photons. How do protons attract electrons, by photon ...
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Gravitational Lensing Example

Like this tomato wrapped underwater and how light is bent around it does the way a black whole bends space and light in the same way?
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1answer
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Convergence of light by light scattering amplitude

Perhaps I'm too exhausted to see the answer of why the photon-photon scattering should contain no divergences. In Peskin and Schroeder page 320 we find that because of the Ward identity the photon-...
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Solar Sail Questions

I'm just looking for a good (better) analogy. How do massless photons put pressure on a surface especially when it's a mirror? Using the analogy of the wind (atmosphere) on a sail breaks down when I ...
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Center of gravity of the photon beam

I have a conceptual question: In singular optics the orbital angular momentum (OAM) is represented by two components: intrinsic (no relation to spin!) and extrinsic. The first one is associated to ...
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1answer
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about the Pound-Rebka experiment and the answer to a second year undergrad student' s question 7 months ago [closed]

The answer tells us about a specific subtraction of the doppler shift so as to obtain the net gravitational redsift. Can anyone explain all this thing about that subtraction?
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14 views

Photon current absorption in substrate and films [closed]

How the photon current affect the film's absorbance and substrate absorbance in a solar cell?
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1answer
65 views

Concerning The Oil Drop Experiment: How does ionizing radiation create the electron(s) that the droplets of oil collect?

Concerning the Oil Drop Experiment: I read, “Ionizing radiation is used to create the electron that the droplets of oil collect. When the air in the apparatus is bombarded by this ionizing radiation ...
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0answers
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Path of photon from Sun to earth unaltered?

I got into a discussion regarding the light from the Sun that reaches the Earth and whether it maintains the same path from the moment it was emitted to the point it is processed by our eyes. My ...
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1answer
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Does the charge leakage of capacitors lead to photon emission?

Capacitors will leak charge over time. This charge is basically electrical current leaking through insulating layer of the capacitor. I am wondering, if there is some emission of photons as there is ...
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2answers
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Question about electron-hole pair generation in depletion layer for a p-n junction photodiode

At the heart of operation of p-n (or p-i-n) junction photodiodes is the absorption of photons leading to generation of electron-hole pairs. If the diode is, e.g., reverse biased, then the motion of ...
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2answers
142 views

What is entanglement really about? [closed]

I am a beginner in this field, I am trying to understand the basics of Quantum Mechanics, I want straightforward answers to few questions on entangled photon/electron: 1- What entangled photons ...
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3answers
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Is there a difference between the speed of light and that of a photon?

As in the title I am curious whether there is a difference between the speed of photon and the speed of light, and if there is what is the cause of such a difference?
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1answer
35 views

In a photovoltaic effect, when the electron absorbes the photon, is the electron's energy displaced?

I'm a super amateur wannabe physicist, and I'm trying to learn the fundamental workings of the photovoltaic effect. I haven't been able to understand "how" or "what" is displaced/transmitted in the ...
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0answers
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Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion and the direction of the electric field component

The Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion process is used to produce a pair of entangled photons. For this photons their electric field components are perfect adjusted by 90°. But the directions are ...
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How SPAD work over Break Down voltage?

SPAD (Single Photon Avalanche Detector) works beyond Breakdown Voltage which is mentioned as Geiger Mode. But how this actually working. When bias voltage aceede breakdown voltage, generally high ...
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1answer
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Is it possible to create a pair of polarized, polarization-entangled photons?

Is there a light source which emits (mostly) polarization-entangled pairs of photons that have a known polarization angle, e.g. a certain angle in relation to the orientation of the source? Applying ...
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1answer
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Aim of photon gun in a double-slit experiment

Hope someone can enlighten me on the following questions: In a double-slit experiment with photon, how is the photon gun aimed? If the photon gun is set up to aim at the barrier space between the ...
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1answer
128 views

Mathematical proof of an electron can't absorb a photon [duplicate]

How can we mathematically prove that a free electron can't absorb a photon totally?
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4answers
259 views

How do electromagnetic waves carry energy?

Its said that electromagnetic waves carry energy. Is this because these waves are made up of electric and magnetic fields which can cause changes to the stuff that falls with in their range? Is that ...
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Do excited electrons drop back to same quantum state?

I'm trying to wrap my head around spectroscopy, therefore, I am looking for as complete an answer as possible here, hence why I have broken the question into a different points. Here is what I know ...
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0answers
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Hologram: How does the interference path of reflected and reference waves change as we move?

I've seen this and this and read this. Either I got dumber in times or these are not sufficient to understand how actually hologram works. I understand how reference light and reflected light ...
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If photons can exert a change in momentum when being reflected, what leads us to conclude they have zero mass? [duplicate]

It is well known that gravity affects light. It is also known that light can impart a change in momentum to objects when being reflected. This leads me to think that photons have momentum and ...
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2answers
66 views

How can we see stars and galaxies if photons are travelling straight?

This may seem a dumb question but I can't visualize this in my mind. If photons are travelling straight then from our eyes or a telescope we should only see part of the star, for example because our ...
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5answers
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Coherence length of a single photon

If I pass individual photons through a M-Z interferometer with equal arms I will observe interference (eg only one detector will respond). As I increase the path length of one arm I will observe the ...
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3answers
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What is the amplitude of a light wave?

Referring to this question How can I measure the amplitude of a light wave? I'm curious about what is a amplitude of a light wave. Especially for light from a thermic source.
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Why are photoelectrons emitted in the direction of incident photons?

In the experiments for photoelectric emission, the light is incident on one face of the emitting plate, for example the anode, when determining the stopping potential. The electrons are emitted by ...
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Why do photons travel?

Photons travel at the speed of light. Is there a known explanation of this phenomenon, and if yes, what is it? Edit: To be clearer, my question is why do photons travel at all. Why do they have a ...
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1answer
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Is there a connection between the frequency of a photon and the oscillation frequency of the atom which absorbs it?

If a photon has energy $E$, we know it has angular frequency $\frac{E}{\hbar}$. If an atom has an energy gap $E$ between its ground and first excited state, we know that if the atom is in a ...
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Photons with half integer angular momentum - what's happening?

I have just read this article - what is happening? Analysing these beams within the theory of quantum mechanics they predicted that the angular momentum of the photon would be half-integer, and ...
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3answers
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Concequences of the speed of light beeing absolute? [duplicate]

If photons have a speed limit (speed of light), what happens when you shoot photons through a flashlight but you yourself already have some speed? Do the photons from the flashlight only travel at [...
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1answer
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Angular Momentum of a Photon

Why is it that the angular momentum of a photon is $\hbar$, irrespective of its energy? I encountered such a claim in a text about Raman spectroscopy. Is there an explanation for this using basic ...
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1answer
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How frequently do accelerating electrons emit photons?

In the quantum 2-slit experiment with light, we know that as the source intensity is turned down, individual photons arrive at the detector. I would like to know if there is a formula which tells us ...
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Does 'real' photon electromagnetically interact with matter?

Consider the standard description of Compton scattering - radiation is constituted of stream of photons (these are supposed to 'real' as contrasted to 'virutal' photons of the QED). One of these ...
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Could a photon also be a fermion? [duplicate]

Some phycisits have found photons that has a spin of 1,5. Now fermions has always a half spin and bosons like photons always with a whole spin. But if those photons really exists are they than ...
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1answer
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Gaining some intuition: Photon bunching

This is a very easy question: I'm in need of some intuition on the fact that, e.g. thermal sources, produce bunched photons. It is very easy to "undertand", without any quantum mechanics, why single ...
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3answers
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Why can't electrons absorb any energy (i.e. absorb some energy of the photons necessary and emit the residual)?

Recently I had a question in mind about the absorption of photons. Why is it that only specific energy levels can be absorbed by electrons? I mean, I get the idea that electrons in an atom have only ...
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1answer
685 views

How do photons experience time? [duplicate]

I know that as velocity approaches the speed of light the time dilation shoots to infinity as shown below. 1)So I want to know how time is perceived from the point of view of the photon? 2)Since ...
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2answers
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How does a photon experience space and time?

To an an external observer it appears that time has stopped for photon. But this relation is reflexive, so for an observer travelling with the photon it appears the universe has stopped everywhere. ...
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Does photon experience time? [duplicate]

According to the special theory of relativity, for all observers the speed of light is c. Any observer travelling at the speed of light c does not experience time. Hence even protons shouldn't ...