"Photon" is the name given to particles of light in the quantum mechanical understanding. In interaction where the classical and quantum mechanical understandings of light agree they are fully equivalent to electromagnetic waves.

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Photons arriving from the Sun

Given that the Sun is a bit less than 10 light minutes away from Earth, is it correct to assume in principle (I understand actual processes in the core of the Sun make the situation at a photon's ...
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What happens to the wavelength/frequency of a photon as it passes through an event horizon?

I've asked a similar question about photons and black holes but wanted to rephrase it more specifically, so here goes... Ever since I learned how a photon's wavelength and frequency are indivisibly ...
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Where can you get a photon detector?

Say I'm doing the double-slit experiment with photons as the particle and want to add a detector just behind each slit to eliminate the interference pattern. Where would I get a detector like that?
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Ejected Electrons with 0 KE?

So I was taught that: Kinetic Energy (of electron) = Energy (of photon) - Ionization Energy If E(photon) = IE, then KE=0 of the electron. What does this physically/theoretically mean? My current ...
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Mechanism for the gravitational field generated by photons

This question follows from a schooling I received in this thread. I figured that photons do not interact with gravity, except when they've spontaneously converted into a particle-antiparticle pair. ...
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576 views

What really is Planck's constant and what are its origins?

In the physics texts I have read and other info online, they says Planck's constant is the quantum of action or that it is a constant of the ratio of the energy of a particle to its frequency. Im ...
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Photon energy - momentum in matter

$E = h\nu$ and $P = h\nu/c$ in vacuum. If a photon enters water, it's frequency $\nu$ doesn't change. What are its energy and momentum : $h\nu$ ? and $h\nu/c$ ? Since part of it's energy and momentum ...
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Why, in EXAFS spectrum, does the absorption coefficient monotonically decrease with increasing photon energy?

In atomic physics, it is common knowledge that following the absorption edge, where the photon energy equals the binding energy of a core electron, a monotonic decrease in the absorption coefficient ...
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Does the Photino have mass or is it mass-less like the photon

Does the photino in super-symmetry have a mass, Or is this different in different super symmetric models?
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How to relate photon's higher frequency to time dilation?

The usual explanation for photon's higher frequency in lower altitudes (higher gravity), when the photon is going downward towards a massive body, is that gravitational potential energy is converted ...
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Modeling the probability of a photodiode measuring photons targets at a neighbor

In current digital cameras, sensors are arrays of photodiodes which "transform" photons energy to electrons. I am aware that the probability of a photon to generate an electron is modeled by a Poisson ...
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Why photons are emitted because of changes to electron behavior

Explanations I have read of why photons are emitted from atoms mention electrons being 'excited' to another energy level, and then returning to their base level, releasing a photon. I have also seen ...
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Black out the sun?

How many observers would it take to cancel out the number of photons produced in a medium sized star like our Sun, thus making it dark? (I want to consume more photons than the star is generating)
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What is the massless limit of massive electromagnetism?

Consider electromagnetism, an abelian gauge theory, with a massive photon. Is the massless limit equal to electromagnetism? What does it happen at the quantum level with the extra degree of freedom? ...
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Why are photons released from high-voltage electricity through a near vacuum?

I read an answer to what is inside a typical vacuum, and it suggested neutrinos from Space, and vapor from the container. So, maybe they add to this effect... But why are photons released from ...
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How many photons can an electron absorb and why?

How many photons can an electron absorb and why? Can all fundamental particles that can absorb photons absorb the same amount of photons and why? If we increase the velocity of a fundamental ...
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when photons can be trapped in a cavity and manipulated. How they can be observed without being destroyed?

An observer is anything that can cause a wave function to collapse. That is an interpretation of wave function collapse (usually referred to as the measurement problem). Now, when can photons be ...
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Is there still light in practical darkness? Do photons penetrate everywhere?

I always thought that, even in darkness, there would still be some light, making complete darkness, i.e. complete absence of photons as far as I know, just a theoretical thing. When I tried looking up ...
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Is it possible to charge photons

For example there are anti-particles to every particle we know, Similary in some sense, is there a possibility that we can charge photons..if not what are the reasons and has there been any attempt ...
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Transmission of Gaussian Beam Through Graded-Index Slab

The $ABCD$ matrix of a glass graded-index slab with refractive index $n(y)=n_0(1-\frac{1}{2}\alpha^{2}y^{2})$ and length $d$ is $A=\cos(\alpha d)$, $B=\frac{1}{\alpha}\sin(\alpha d)$, $C=-\alpha ...
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Is there any optical experiment that can not be explained by photon model defined in QED?

Some author(in the paper of Evolution of the modern photon) mentioned that photon cannot account for the zero intensity through two crossed polarizators by 90 degree. Why so?
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Non-conversion of mass & energy?

This article is certainly an interesting alternative perspective, but is it factual or does it contain fallacies? http://www.circlon-theory.com/HTML/EmcFallacies.html Are mass and energy not ...
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Can non-photon atomic particles (can/may be) stimulate photonreceptors in our eyes?

I want to ask if the human eye can see only photons particles between ultra violet and infrared wavelengths, can we see other particles (that have a wavelength between ultra violet and infrared) ...
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What is a virtual photon pair?

When describing a black hole evaporation in the hawking black body radiation it is usually said that is due to a virtual photon pair, is it this what happens? And what is virtual photon pair, does the ...
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Why is Light invisible?

Why can't we see light? The thing which makes everything visible is itself invisible. Why is it so?
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What is the difference between infrared heat and “regular” heat?

In Feynman's terms temperature is the speed at which atoms are 'jiggling'. Now, let's suppose I've just eaten a sizable dinner, and my body temperature just got a tad up. Am I emitting more photons in ...
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Photonics: Slab As a Lens [closed]

The question can be found here: http://gyazo.com/fc4d26cd35e6ce368ad2a8ed504f1dcc The refractive index it references can be found here: http://gyazo.com/94fd2f3b5ea7da9226c3acd56b0024c1 I'm not ...
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Single photon and double-slit experiment [duplicate]

Laser fires single particles of light, called photons, through the slits. Even though only single photons of light are being fired through the slits and They create three pattern again. How single ...
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Conservation Laws in Photon Parametric Down-Conversion

As Wikipedia explains, one photon passing through a crystal sometimes down-converts to two photons. Wikipedia says total energy and momentum are conserved by just considering the three photon states; ...
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How is an ideal mirrored box of photons distinguishable from massive particles?

Suppose you have an ideal mirrored box that contains enough photons as to have a relativistic mass equivalent to the [rest mass + kinetic energy] of an electron. In other words, the two systems have ...
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Why is there a photon every millimeter on earth coming from a star millions of light years away?

I've been having this confusing thought for so long now it would be amazing if someone could answer me. Imagine this asterisk * . As you see, from the center point, lines go outwards, just like a ...
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What happens when a photon hits a mirror?

When a photon of light hits a mirror does the exact same photon of light bounce back or is it absorbed then one with the same properties emitted? If the same one is bounced back does it's velocity ...
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polarization and frequency of a single photon

I believe that we can take a single photon state as a tensor product of a frequency Hilbert space (infinite dimension) and a polarization Hilbert space (dim 2). Does this mean we can measure the ...
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Does the uncertainty principle apply to photons?

Wikipedia claims the following: More generally, the normal concept of a Schrödinger probability wave function cannot be applied to photons. Being massless, they cannot be localized without being ...
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Is it possible to change the path of a single photon?

In other words, if a photon is emitted from source, is it possible to change its course en route either by introducing a gravitational lensing or some sort to change the road it travels (spacetime) ...
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Photons and uncertainty principle

Let's assume we have a perfect single-photon source: a device emitting exactly one photon at a time, with defined energy and direction. Let's shoot a photon: we know exactly the position of the photon ...
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Why do photons add mass to a black hole?

Why do photons add mass to a black hole? When photons are taken irreversibly into a black hole does the mass of the BH increase?
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Why do photons travel?

Photons travel at the speed of light. Is there a known explanation of this phenomenon, and if yes, what is it? Edit: To be clearer, my question is why do photons travel at all. Why do they have a ...
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How is light affected by gravity?

Light is clearly affected by gravity, just think about a black hole, but light supposedly has no mass and gravity only affects objects with mass. On the other hand, if light does have mass then ...
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Expression for the (relativistic) mass of the photon [closed]

I started learning a bit ahead from an old physics book, and they were discussing the photoelectric effect and after that Planck's hypotheses and energy quantas. The book said that the mass of a ...
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The electron jumps and lets loose photons

Where is the source of the photon. If the photon propagates from within the electrons transit does this point to some sort of field? Does the energy come from a boundary being broken in laymens ...
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Photoelectric effect without light rays

For electromagnetic waves we have the photon association, one imagines light as particles "flying around". What is the analogy for a constant electrical field, one which doesn't change in time ...
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Compton scattering angle

Say a photon hits a free electron at rest. I understand that there is a formula for the Compton scattering when the photon is scattered with an angle $\theta$, but I don't understand what determines ...
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Compton scattering vs. photoelectric effect

Say a photon hits some atom. What determines whether there will be a photoelectric effect (photon is absorbed, electron is released) or whether there will be a Compton scattering (the photon is ...
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If electromagnetic fields give charge to particles, do photons carry charge?

As I understand these two statements: An electromagnetic field gives particles charge A photon is a quantum of electromagnetic field It must mean that a photon carries charge. But I guess it isn't ...
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How do photons travel at a speed that should be impossible to attain?

If it requires infinite amount of energy to travel at the speed of light then how photon attains this speed? Its source is never infinitely sourced.
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PV cell for invisible spectrum only

Is it possible to make a photovoltaic cell that would only absorb the invisible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, while letting visible light pass through or bounce off its surface? I guess that ...
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Is it possible to send a single photon from a distant planet (say Mars) and detect its arrival at a site on Earth?

My question is specifically whether there exists a technique by which a single photon can be "tagged" or "encoded" in such a way that it can traverse our atmosphere and arrive at some sort of detector ...
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polarization - quantum point of view

polarization could be easily imagined in classical model: direction of E vector. is there any simple image for polarization of single photon?
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Does this photon emission problem even make sense?

I came across this question in an introductory physics course awhile back and I never got over it: "A hydrogen atom has an electron in the n=5 orbit, what is the maximum number of photons that might ...