The photon is the quantum of the electromagnetic four-potential, and therefore the massless bosonic particle associated with the electromagnetic force, commonly also called the "particle of light". Use this tag for questions about the quantum-mechanical understanding of light and/or electromagnetic ...

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How can photons cause charges to attract? [duplicate]

Photons are the force carrier of the electromagnetic force. I do not see how this could result in a transfer of momentum that attracts objects together. I am primarily interested in an intuitive ...
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1answer
103 views

If photons have mass then how can they travel at speed of light? [closed]

Anything that has mass must be slower than speed of light. If they are travelling at speed of light they must contain infinite energy which should be able to destroy everything, clearly thats not ...
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Will the flash light accelerate in space? [duplicate]

As we know from school physics course light has pressure. So my question is will flash light accelerate in space in the direction opposite to light emission? If not, then will flash light with ...
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1answer
161 views

Difference between photon upconversion and two photon absorption?

One can find in the wikipedia the following assertion: Upconversion should be distinguished from two-photon absorption However, it is difficult to tell the difference between both processes by ...
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3answers
61 views

Interference of two identical laser source

Do two identical but separate laser sources cancel out each other when point on the same spot? By the way both light will be coming from same direction. And of course, they will have a phase ...
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0answers
27 views

In a photovoltaic effect, when the electron absorbes the photon, is the electron's energy displaced?

I'm a super amateur wannabe physicist, and I'm trying to learn the fundamental workings of the photovoltaic effect. I haven't been able to understand "how" or "what" is displaced/transmitted in the ...
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1answer
79 views

Help me understand Pound and Rebka's experiment

I am a second year undergrad physics student and up until now have done some classical mechanics and some electrodynamics. For some reason I have always been really interested in light. A couple of ...
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0answers
11 views

Is it possible to select a single carrier type in a photodiode?

I have been reading about avalanche photodiodes and understand that they work via the impact ionization process to produce internal gain in the diode before the signal is read. It appears that ...
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0answers
20 views

Directional propagator for Gaussian single photon emitters

I am generating photons along a vertical line in 2D space (say along the x=0 line) at spatial coordinates $x = (x_1, x_2, ..., x_n)$ by the following means $\hat{a}^\dagger(x_1)\hat{a}^\dagger(x_2) ...
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23 views

Radiative transfer in a two dimensional slab

I am trying to implement some radiative transfer to a hydrodynamics code. However, all texts that deal with multidimensional radiative transfer assume spherical coordinates, however the hydro code is ...
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3answers
163 views

Physical reason why the wavelength defines the minimum sized opening an electromagnetic wave can pass through? [duplicate]

I'm having a hard time understanding why wavelength restricts a wave from passing through a hole smaller than that wavelength. For example on a microwave, the front grating prevents the microwaves ...
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0answers
27 views

Modeling total absorption using absorbance of multiple visual layers

I have a question involving light absorbance versus absorption. It applies to a stack of different photoreceptor types. I understand the difference between absorbance, which is basically equal to ...
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2answers
113 views

Can one photon emit two electrons?

My question refers to the photoelectric effect. I have heard that it is possible, that for one photon, two electrons leave the irradiated metal. Is this correct and by which process can this be ...
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2answers
50 views

When dihydrogen is formed, are photons being emitted?

When a hydrogen in an excited state transits back to the ground state, a photon (or series of photons) is emitted in accordance with the selection rules. When two free hydrogen atoms in the ground ...
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0answers
136 views

How do I get the amplitude for the one-loop photon self-energy?

I am studying Maggiore's book on QFT and I am stuck in the amplitudes of one-loop corrections in QED. Could someone clearly explain me how do I get the following amplitude from the respective diagram? ...
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5answers
5k views

Could gravity accelerate light? [duplicate]

Gravity causes anything with energy to accelerate toward the source. Black holes, for example, have such strong gravity that they pull in light and don't let any escape. But can acceleration still ...
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0answers
18 views

Effect of a photon on curvature of spacetime [duplicate]

Since light has no rest mass, is it reasonable to assume that the curvature of spacetime is not affected (distorted) by a single photon? Sure, a photon is attracted due to gravity. But could be ...
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3answers
173 views

Can a photon be absorbed by a proton?

When incident light passes through a hydrogen gas, for example, does it have 50% chance (since it's a 1:1 ratio of protons to electrons) of getting absorbed by the proton? Any chance at all? If no, ...
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2answers
75 views

Light wave particle duality

I have studied about the dual nature of light and all the experiments that proved light was a wave and sometimes a particle, and I am comfortable with the concept that it can be both. However, I have ...
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1answer
96 views

Angular Momentum of a Photon

Why is it that the angular momentum of a photon is $\hbar$, irrespective of its energy? I encountered such a claim in a text about Raman spectroscopy. Is there an explanation for this using basic ...
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1answer
46 views

Photon as a mediator of electric field

How can a photon (which has momentum) from one electrically charged particle to an oppositely charged particle cause these particles to be pulled toward each other - or how can a magnetic field cause ...
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2answers
82 views

How many photons does my remote control garage opener emit?

Every time I drive up to my house I imagine all the photons spitting out of the remote control garage opener when I press the button. And I imagine the door opener in the garage receiving them. There ...
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1answer
179 views

Positron-electron annihilation - can more than two photons be created?

I'm an engineer and been reading about PET scanners and how they rely on the fact that a positron-electron annihilation will cause two photons to be emitted at 180 degrees from each other. After a bit ...
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1answer
62 views

Does third law of motion apply to light or EM waves? [duplicate]

Third law of motion - "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction" I was considering the situation, where I may be motionless in space with only a flashlight and no forces acting on me. ...
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0answers
36 views

How are the photon and electron entangled in this situation? [duplicate]

If one of the photons in an entangled pair produced in parametric down conversion is absorbed by an electron or atom than this elecfron must be entangled with tge other photon. In what degree of ...
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2answers
43 views

Photons reflecting off matter

When photons reflect off matter, do they always lose momentum to the object? If they lose momentum to the object, that means they lose energy, and so their frequency should decrease. However, when we ...
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51 views

Creation of entangled electrons

If one obtains two entangled in polarization photons by parametric down conversion and one of them is accepted by and electron 1 and other by electron 2 - are this electrons now entangled in spin?
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1answer
49 views

Transformation of energy of a photon

I'm new to the forum so excuse me if I'm doing anything in a wrong format. My question is this: A photon fired from a spaceship at rest has energy $E$, if the spaceship starts moving with speed ...
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3answers
65 views

Splitting molecule

The photon reacts with the binding electrons orbiting the two atoms. The photons have the 'correct' wavelength for Bond Dissociation Energy (BDE). 'Splitting' the molecule involves applying the ...
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0answers
52 views

Do virtual photons give particle charges?

I think the electric field is due to the exchange of virtual photons constantly emitted by the point charged particle such as an electron, does this apply to proton which is consisted of quarks? does ...
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2answers
56 views

Photo Multiplier Tube Usage

How is it determined that a PMT measures only one photon ? By the energy that one photon is supposed to have ?
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1answer
137 views

Can an electron jump to a higher energy level if the energy is insufficient or exceeds the ΔE

Lets say we have an atom of hydrogen. It has one electron on E1 = -13.6 eV (E2 = -3.4 eV) energy level. I know that if we fire a photon with 10.2 eV energy the hydrogen atom will absorb it and the ...
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1answer
25 views

The wavelength of photons emitted

If for example an electron in a hydrogen atom moved from n=2 to n=1, how can you find the wavelength of the emitted photon? I know that the energy involved is E = -13.6 eV * (1/(n_1)^2 - 1/(n_2)^2) ...
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1answer
190 views

Explanation for Refraction of light (change of angle) and Reflection

Refraction: I want a qualitative Quantum Mechanical explanation of why do we see light rays -in the classical picture- bend when light goes from one medium to another. I read that it is due to ...
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2answers
48 views

Why is it that when I do some substitution, I get $p=1$ for a photon? [closed]

I know that this is wrong, but where did i make a mistake? I just use a few equations and substitutions and I get that the momentum of a photon is one. Here is my math: $p=h/λ$ $p=hf/c$ (substituted ...
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2answers
129 views

Particle anti-particle annihilation and photon production

This is just a conceptual question I guess. The annihilation of a particle with a finite mass and its anti-particle cannot lead to the emission of only one photon, and this is due to the conservation ...
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1answer
53 views

How to understand photons in terms of EM force carrier? [duplicate]

Say, there are 2 stationary electrons placed at a distance. The result of observation would be both flying apart with the same speed and the opposite direction, which would obey laws of conservation ...
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1answer
40 views

Photon polarization as a two-state system, what is the Hamiltonian?

In chapter III.11-4 of the Feynman lectures, he describes the polarization of a photon (with its momentum in the z direction) as a two-state system with the base states $\{|x\rangle,|y\rangle\}$ or ...
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1answer
72 views

Einstein equivalence principle cannot entirely predict gravitational time dilation

The Einstein equivalence principle can be used to derive the gravitational redshift of photons, but it does so in an unusual way. The derivation is as follows. Consider an source of photons on the ...
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Addition of Colors and Fluorescence

In fluorescence, you have an excited electron returning to ground state in multiple transitions, each emitting a photon of a lower frequency than the photon that excited the electron in the first ...
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1answer
38 views

How long will the light exist inside the sphere?

Ok, so let's say we have a very thick, but hollow, metal sphere. The inside of the sphere has a radius of 100 meters. The sphere also has a door that can be opened and closed and when closed makes an ...
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1answer
58 views

Single photon's gravitational field: “where” is it?

When a photon passes through a hole in a screen, the photon's energy is pretty localized, namely a the hole. Now let the photon "fly" for a minute into the open void. The field representing ...
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1answer
23 views

Direct bandgap semiconductor reaction to heat. Produce light?

In an indirect bandgap semiconductor if you apply heat the number of free electrons increases, conductivity increases, and the bandgap decreases. In a direct bandgap semiconductor is there any ...
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1answer
89 views

What is the bigger number of particles crossing an area: the number of photons or the number of neutrinos? [closed]

Take an squared area with (10²)² m² in front of the sun. What is the bigger number of particles crossing an area: the number of photons or the number of neutrinos? Just for clarification: you can ...
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1answer
42 views

Does the frequency of photons decrease at outer radii of a helical mode?

A helical mode is a mode of the electromagnetic field in which the wavefront is characterized by one or more helixes. Along the direction of travel, at the center, lies an "optical vortex." The ...
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2answers
83 views

Photoelectric effect and energy of light

I have a doubt about photoelectric effect and the nature of light in general. From what I understood, in order to ionize a piece of some material, I need an electromagnetic wave with a frequence ...
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1answer
52 views

Why is blue darker than yellow in an analog black and white photograph?

Blue is perceived darker than yellow by the human eye, because of biological principles within the eye. I can understand that therefore, when making a picture black&white in software like Adobe ...
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1answer
45 views

Quantum entanglement and Compton Effect

Suppose we generate 2 entangled photons (via a beam-splitter or similar apparatus). They have an arbitrary indeterminate initial frequency $\nu_i$. One of these photons is allowed to propagate through ...
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27 views

Do copropagating photon pairs exist?

Countepropagating photon pairs with opposing spin are well known. Are there physical phenomena that produce copropagating photon pairs with opposing spin? Wild speculation: A cooper pair of ...
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2answers
281 views

Will high amplitude, low frequency light be capable of wrapping around a macroscopic object? [duplicate]

To me, as a macroscopic observer of light, it appears that light moves in straight lines. If I shine a light at object A and object B moves between me and object A, the light hits, i.e. gets blocked ...