The photon is the quantum of the electromagnetic four-potential, and therefore the massless bosonic particle associated with the electromagnetic force, commonly also called the "particle of light". Use this tag for questions about the quantum-mechanical understanding of light and/or electromagnetic ...

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Pair Production in Entangled Photons

Two high-energy photons are entangled and go their separate ways. One of them undergoes pair production by interacting with an atomic nucleus, and this is observed. Does the other photon also undergo ...
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How do we see? Where do the photons disappear?

I know that the light is reflected from a object to my eyes, but I don't understand exactly how. The photons appear from the light source and disappear in my eye! Can someone explain the phenomenon of ...
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67 views

How to turn the light stronger than your strength in start

Imagine the following scenario: I have one lamp, and I would like to turn it stronger, like a strength of 2 lamps. Can I do it, passing the light (for example) through one crystal or a special ...
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2answers
174 views

Matter to energy conversion

Okay so I have a question, during a nuclear explosion or particle/antiparticle annihilation, matter is converted into energy. How do I determine if a from a explosion will come lets say a small ...
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2answers
216 views

What is the significance of wavelength when referring to light (in layman's terms)?

Without any equations or complex terminology, I simply want to understand in complete layman's terms what the significance of a single photon's wavelength is. People say that microwave radiation's ...
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2answers
59 views

Which photons pass through a circular annulus?

Passing light through a circular sieve: Well, actually, let’s think about radar or microwaves with a wavelength of order a centimeter or two, so you can tailor your aperture, say by etching a silver ...
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51 views

Is possible to use optical fiber to transmit light to streetlights? [closed]

I was thinking about this idea: Only one lamp, inside a optical fiber structure, transmitting all the light through a lot of optical fiber cables direct to streetlights. (I guess that the cables ...
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1answer
101 views

$U(1)$ local gauge invariance in QED [duplicate]

While constructing Lagrangian of QED, we don't add the mass term for photon $\dfrac{1}{2} m^{2}A_{\mu}A^{\mu}$ because gauge invariance does not allow. I want to ask, whether "$\bf{Theoretically}$", ...
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59 views

The Thomson scattering optical depth for a photon ar radius r

I am looking to understand some more about the physics of gamma ray bursts. In particular I am looking at the origin of the "prompt emission". Some of the energy associated with this prompt emission ...
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2answers
811 views

What the lifetime of a massless black hole of photons?

Let a bundle of photons very concentrated in a very small area so that the space-time is curved as a black hole, and the photons can't escape: this is what I call a massless black hole of photons. ...
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3answers
78 views

Observing a photon during flight

When I was reading about the double-slit experiment in quantum mechanics, everything seems to make sense in terms of the waves and the interference pattern, but if thinking more about this ...
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1answer
98 views

What's the difference between vacuum particle-antiparticle annhiliation and regular annihilation?

Why does vacuum particle-antiparticle creation and annihilation result in nothing rather than photons? What is the difference between that and regular annihilation that does result in photons.
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101 views

Thought experiment on light accumulation

Consider an object which is a spherical one-way mirror, and let's call it the "Sphere". For the needs of the thought experiment, suppose that: the Sphere is perfectly spherical the mirror is ...
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1answer
118 views

Do photons have six degrees of freedom?

Calculations involving pressure and volume relationships of photon gas during the cosmologic expansion of the universe posit an adiabatic cooling process with a heat capacity ration of 4/3. This ratio ...
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1answer
29 views

Why is radiation under Poynting-Robertson drag anisotropic?

According to the Wikipedia article on Poynting-Robertson drag, the reason solar radiation slows an orbiting object is because the re-radiation of photons by the object is anisotropic in the frame of ...
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2answers
67 views

Do photons experience every moment in time and position in space simultaneously? [duplicate]

Would it be more correct to say that a photon, traveling at the speed of light, would experience all points in time simultaneously, and therefore be everywhere at once? It might be just our ...
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1answer
198 views

Physical meaning of wavelength of an EM wave

What is the physical meaning of the wavelength of light? This question has been asked before but I cannot find a satisfactory answer. Some respondents have said that the question is vague, I don't ...
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3answers
151 views

Are there more photons than nuclei within the Sun?

Are there more photons than nuclei within the Sun? Is there a good way to estimate what the ratio would be?
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2answers
102 views

When a charged particle absorbs a photon, does the particle get 'pulled' or 'pushed'?

When a charged particle absorbs a photon, does the particle accelerate towards where the photon was coming from or where the photon was going
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2answers
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Is the change in orbital of an electron the only way a photon is created

I would like to know if there are any other ways in which photon's are being emitted other than in the case an electron's orbital around a nucleus changes.
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0answers
100 views

UV absorption decrease with an increase in concentration

I am working on a project measuring the absorbance of a solution which contains surfactant and hard brine. The solution has a constant concentration of surfactant and varying concentration of hard ...
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2answers
107 views

Video of light passing through water

How is this possible? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtsXgODHMWk Video shows beam of light travelling through water. I was under impression that Einstein's equations showed that light speed is ...
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1answer
35 views

Material that changes transparency when lased from side?

I am into photonics research, and have been searching about this topic in vain, but almost nothing from Google shows up. So i turned here for some light. Do you guys know any material that changes ...
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1answer
73 views

Can we detect a photon's direction?

The question of if a photon even has a direction may be up for interpretation, but I wanted to know if it's possible for a device to absorb most light from every which direction and only detect light ...
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248 views

Faster-Than-Light Communication using Entangled Photons

Based on my understanding of the “Double-Slit Quantum Eraser Experiment”, documented here: http://grad.physics.sunysb.edu/~amarch/, it seems that Faster-Than-Light communication is possible. Of ...
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2answers
53 views

Would an ordinary or fluorescent lightbulb generate electricity when exposed to light?

I was wondering whether the physic laws or the nature in which lightbulbs are constructed would allow for lightbulb to generate electricity when subjected to strong (intensive and concentrated) ...
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4answers
208 views

Do photons affect one another

This question can have many answers. For one, I would be enlightened to understand whether two photons can truly create an electron-positron pair, as well I would like to know if a photon is able to ...
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2answers
229 views

What is the most common photon wavelength in our observable universe (not including the Sun)?

Ignoring the Sun, what is the most common wavelength of a photon that is received by us on average? (I am not asking what is the average wavelength, but rather what is the most common wavelength ...
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0answers
23 views

Would it be ok to say that not all light travels at the same speed when you consider its own perspective? [duplicate]

The reason I am asking is because higher energy would cause greater gravitational time dilation. Therefore I would expect, from the perspective of a radio wave, a gamma ray having more energy would ...
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1answer
56 views

Rate of interaction of free electron with photons from sunlight

How many photons does a free electron (in sunlight say) interact with per second? I did a rough calculation assuming the electron interacts with any photon that enters through an area the size of ...
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1answer
81 views

Can photons accelerate? [duplicate]

I was just wondering if there's a (hypothetical) situation where a photon could accelerate and what the consequences of this might be?
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1answer
52 views

Why photons don't have or match the energy difference of atom in order to pass thought that material?

Rule I learned: only photons with quanta of energy match matching the exact difference between energy levels can be absorbed/ reemitted. But to me optical density works opposite to this rule. ...
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1answer
49 views

What degrees of freedom (other than polarization) of a photon can be used to store quantum information? [duplicate]

Usually in quantum optics, one uses the polarization degree of freedom of the photon to create and manipulate photonic qubits. This, using various linear optics devices, can be coupled with the 'path ...
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1answer
46 views

Can high energy electrons slow down by emitting photons?

When a charged particle is moving with large kinetic energy in the Earth's reference frame, can it emit a photon effectively slowing it down in this frame?
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1answer
57 views

Will I sunburn faster when driving compared to being parked?

I'm not sure if the same logic applies to light and rain when comparing running/driving with a stagnant situation. See, e.g. Why does driving faster make my windshield catch more rain? Suppose I have ...
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80 views

Will objects heat up and become hidden at relativistic speed?

Let us assume there is a mirror travelling at extremely relativistic speeds, perhaps few picometers away from speed of light, and let us assume we have a very thin detector which is very small perhaps ...
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5answers
874 views

What happens when two photons collide with one another, head on, dead center? [duplicate]

If two photons were to collide directly, head on, and are of the same energy, what happens? Are new particles created, is energy released? Or do they just pass through one another?
6
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1answer
515 views

Can two colliding photons create a Higgs Boson?

The LHC discovered the Higgs using the following decay mode: $$ H^0 \rightarrow \gamma \gamma $$ This got me thinking: if we reverse this mode, will it be valid? In some annihilation/decay pairs, ...
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19 views

Why does time stand still for light? [duplicate]

The source for this is the book "Einstein for Dummies", page 330, chapter 10.
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2answers
55 views

Does light ever experiences acceleration? [duplicate]

Till now I have learned that light has fastest speed. But I have also noticed that wherever it travels it only experiences retardation. So I wanted to know if light ever felt acceleration naturally in ...
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1answer
37 views

Recreating an image from a photometer or similar light-detecting device?

I'm thinking if it is possible to recreate an image from data from this kind of device. It is known analog signals theoretically have infinite resolution, but since we use them in discrete systems ...
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2answers
174 views

Why are electrons alike but photons not?

Perhaps this is a misconception, but why are electrons alike and photons not? Given two photons, they may differ by having different frequencies (energies). Given two electrons, there are just two ...
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0answers
98 views

Can pair production be used to explain the EM Drive? [closed]

My understanding of the EM Drive: LOTS of energy and a little light is input into the system. A tiny amount of force is then exerted out of the system. Can this system be explained simply through ...
34
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8answers
9k views

Why can't we see light travelling from point A to B?

Let's say we have a cloud of dust which is a lightyear across and someone shoots a beam of light from point A to B , why it is not possible for an observer far far away to see the light while it ...
5
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2answers
144 views

Quantum electron and field interactions

What is the proper way to consider the electric field generated by an electron wavefunction governed by the Schrodinger equation? Can you get a result that would match observation, or is this a ...
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2answers
167 views

Magnetism and Photons

Knowing that magnetic field is made from photons. Where does a magnet gets it's photons from to create a magnetic field. Are the photons created within the magnet, or does the magnet capture photons ...
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1answer
68 views

Light changes wavelength in the presence of gravity, can the quantum theory of gravity explain this?

If light changes wavelength in the presence of a gravitational field, how can this be described by the quantum theory of gravity?
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2answers
138 views

will osmium or lead stop all high-energy photons in a shorter distance?

I remember seeing a similar question to this one on Physics StackExchange once. Most of the answers were to the effect of "I don't like the way this question is phrased, so I will insult your ...
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1answer
70 views

Can a photon excite an electron via the uncertainty principle?

An electron is trapped in an infinite well potential with a width of $\Delta x$. A photon of wavelength $\lambda $ < $\Delta x$ is fired at the electron and misses or rather they don't interact. ...
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1answer
77 views

How are photons effected by gravity? [duplicate]

If we use E²=m²c⁴+p²c², and we know mass of photon is zero, and they have momentum but why aren't they affected by gravity.