The photon is the quantum of the electromagnetic four-potential, and therefore the massless bosonic particle associated with the electromagnetic force, commonly also called the "particle of light". Use this tag for questions about the quantum-mechanical understanding of light and/or electromagnetic ...

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How does an Inductor “store” energy?

It seems to me that an electromagnetic field is nothing more than a collection of photons, which as I've heard, extends through space infinitely. Why is it, then, that an inductor such as simple ...
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2answers
82 views

Models of light

As far as I'm aware, there are two different (and almost contradictory) models that describe the behavior of light: light as a wave (EM), and light as a particle (QM). From what I've heard, depending ...
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0answers
39 views

Does photon polarization take place without scattering processes?

Behind two perpendicular crossed polarisation filters (for visible light) the intensity of light will be zero. After installing a third filter between the two others non parallel to each of them some ...
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1answer
56 views

Quantum mechanics between proton & electron but not electron and positron

An electron approaching a proton gives off the hydrogen spectra. An electron approaching a positron does not give off the spectrum of hydrogen. Why? Both scenarios are -1 charge approach a +1 charge. ...
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1answer
119 views

Can I use the grand canonical ensemble for a photon gas?

I have been reading about photon gases at https://www2.chem.utah.edu/steele/doc/chem7040/chandlerch4.pdf. They do the analysis using a canonical ensemble. Since photon numbers are not conserved, I ...
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3answers
193 views

Why most of physics is somehow related to light? [closed]

It seems that for the past 200 years, every physicist is concerned about light. For example : Newton's particle model, Young experiment, Photo-Electrict effect and Einstein's formula, Special ...
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3answers
821 views

Is Maxwell's field the wave function of the photon?

In his ArXiv paper What is Quantum Field Theory, and What Did We Think It Is? Weinberg states on page 2: In fact, it was quite soon after the Born–Heisenberg–Jordan paper of 1926 that the idea ...
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1answer
331 views

Is Magnetic Field is made of Photon? Is there any frequency of Magnetic Field waves? [duplicate]

(Considering the What is a magnetic field question which is asked on just 8th march, by @DragonSlayer3 and my own question which is left with negative points and closed, Photon Energies in sunlight, ...
2
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2answers
107 views

Why does the photon propagator contain the metric tensor?

The Klein Gordon propagator is (Peskin p-30) $$ D_F(x-y)=\frac{i}{p^2-m^2} $$ which is actually the Green's function of the KG field. But a photon contains additionally $g_{\mu\nu}$ in the numerator. ...
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2answers
24 views

X-ray radiation - What does h * fmax = e * U mean?

I'm trying to figure out this formula for X-ray radiation $$h \times f_{max} = e \times U$$ $h$ = Planck's constant $f_{max}$ = maximum frequency, in hertz (?), that the photons can have because ...
3
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2answers
124 views

Dose-depth curve of photons vs. protons

The dose-depth curve of protons and photons can be seen in the image below: Now, what I've heard is, that in some cases, proton therapy is advantageous compared to photons, and of course the other ...
2
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3answers
131 views

Is it possible to create a beam of light with frequency of 0?

Is it possible to create a beam of light with frequency of 0? So this would involve photon(s) that move forward without fluctuating with any frequency. If yes, how could this be done? Also, ...
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1answer
11 views

Saturation point of incident Light on an object

Since the color of objects depends on the parts of the visible spectrum reflected out and the remaining is absorbed; is there any maximum limit to which the absorption can take place? In other words, ...
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2answers
129 views

Does each photon have a unique wavelength?

Since the frequencies (or inversely, wavelengths) of photons are part of a continuous realm, doesn't this mean that no photon has exactly the same frequency? Two photons might have the same apparent ...
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0answers
20 views

Do photons exert gravity? [duplicate]

I read about GR today and came across the Bonnor beam. As I understand it, two parallel light beams (in a flat space) will in fact creep – slowly – towards each other. As Wikipedia puts it: On the ...
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1answer
50 views

Do photons have a spectrum like light when they are treated as waves?

If light can be treated as both a particle and a wave, are there things called infrared photons, or ultraviolet photons etc, as there are infrared waves, or ultraviolet waves? Or are photons just ...
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6answers
4k views

Where do photons go when they are absorbed?

The answer I usually get (and I'm paraphrasing here) is that they disappear and are instead absorbed as heat energy. But I find it hard to believe that the photon simply "disappears." Common sense ...
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1answer
62 views

Spectral lines and QM

In the various presentations I've seen so far in atomic physics of series such as the Balmer series, the wavelength of each spectral line is definite - but in QM, free particles have no definite ...
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4answers
443 views

Can we change a photon's frequency in mid-air?

Can we have a light source emitting photons in the infrared range and after, lets say, 5 meters, these photons become a photon in the x-ray range? The only way I know we can change a photon's ...
3
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2answers
129 views

Do light particle/waves have a frequency? [duplicate]

I sought the answer to the question about amplitude of light waves first, but I was actually thinking about whether the wavelength is the only property of a single quanta of light. I suppose direction ...
1
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1answer
63 views

Can an electron which is a bound in an atom absorb more than one photon at the same time? [duplicate]

Can an electron which is a bound in an atom absorb more than one photon at the same time ? In specific during photo-electric emission can an electron take in more than one photon if one photon doesn't ...
4
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2answers
129 views

What happens to photons that get trapped in a black holes event horizon?

So, I know that photons do not travel fast enough to escape a black hole once it passes the event horizon. Also, I know that the photons themselves aren't affected by the gravity, but rather their ...
4
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2answers
112 views

If photon-photon interactions are impossible, how are higher harmonics generated?

In nonlinear optics, it is a rather common process to use nonlinear materials to produce higher harmonics of an incident wave. About the mechanism of the generation of such higher harmonics, it is ...
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1answer
48 views

Entangled Photon (laser pointer)

From a laser pointer emission; is it creating entangled pairs of photon? is it possible to get more than "pair" entangled, like group of photons all entangled?
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0answers
37 views

Is this fine to think of light as the following? [closed]

Is light quantums (increments [photons]) of the electromagnetic waves which are synchronized by oscillations of electromagnetic fields
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2answers
517 views

Have they really photographed light behaving both as a particle and a wave?

I just came across this article where they are claiming that they have photographed light behaving both as a wave and a particle! The paper has been published in Nature Communications and I read the ...
2
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1answer
28 views

Can a fluorophore emit a higher energy photon than it absorbed

It is unclear for me what processes are exactly in place during the absorption-reemission process of a fluorescing photon. I am thinking about the case when the absorption and emission spectrum ...
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1answer
75 views

Is it possible to give photons an electric charge?

I know that photons have no electric charge and that they are stable, but is it possible to give them a positive or negative charge? If so how?
3
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1answer
140 views

How do photons carry information?

In cosmology it's frequently said that photons from the early universe carry information from that time. However, wouldn't they also carry data from later interactions? How do we differentiate ...
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1answer
26 views

How does the flow of photons (qty/s) vary across the spectrum? (In everyday life)

Humans see only a narrow band of light wavelengths. Many animals see much deeper into infrared. Maybe one clue to explain why we don't see IR naturally, has to do with the light intensity as a ...
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1answer
68 views

Is my calcualtion from the mass of a photon right? [closed]

The Mass off a Photon The right format can be found here: Photon E = hv E = mc2 E = av (amplitude, frequency) m = hv/c2 Mass = movement of electromagnetic fields Planck’s constant = electromagnetic ...
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3answers
130 views

How are photons made?

I mean in manufacturing a bicycle we know how to "ensemble" a bicycle, what actions and "assembly of parts". So what steps are needed for make a photon? Also is there a limit on how many photons for ...
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0answers
47 views

How can spacetime affect massless entities? [duplicate]

Why is light affected and "bent" by spacetime if it has no mass or density?
0
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2answers
141 views

Why does light travel as waves? [duplicate]

Why does light travel as waves instead of say just a straight line? What are the forces that make a light photon travel in a wavelike pattern?
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0answers
111 views

Is this “classical model of the photon” real?

I do not know how to phrase the question better but this article claims to have a classical model of the photon. Has this (rather extraordinary) claim been verified? Here is an extract from the link ...
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2answers
249 views

Are electron fields and photon fields part of the same field in QED?

I know in classical field theory we have the electromagnetic field. And Maxwell's equations show how electromagnetic radiation can propagate through empty space. I also have been reading about QED ...
0
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1answer
80 views

Question about electron-hole pair generation in depletion layer for a p-n junction photodiode

At the heart of operation of p-n (or p-i-n) junction photodiodes is the absorption of photons leading to generation of electron-hole pairs. If the diode is, e.g., reverse biased, then the motion of ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Why would a photon striking an electron “make both recoil”? [duplicate]

Why would a photon striking an electron "make both recoil" as I read in an answer to another question. If the photon is massless, how can it make an electron change momentum?
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0answers
21 views

Holding a photolithography mask (EUV litography) with magnets, to minimize deformation on the photomask?

Some background: what is this question about? On 20/11/2014, I visited the ASML Holding in the Netherlands, which is according to them, and according to Wikipedia: the largest supplier in the ...
2
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3answers
148 views

What is a photon? [duplicate]

I'm trying to get a definitive and clear answer to the question of what a photon actually is. Textbooks seem to give quite vague explanations, all starting with Einstein's idea that a quanta is a form ...
0
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0answers
45 views

Photons and gravity [duplicate]

A very powerful laser pointing to the empty space next to small object in space. The photons in the laser beam does not hit the object. Will the small object be gravitationally affected by that laser ...
4
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1answer
66 views

How can absorption spectra form if atoms can't remain in an excited state?

I have been tasked to write a research paper on stars. However, I know very little about physics in general. I am learning about how we can glean information about stars by analyzing the light that ...
2
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1answer
211 views

Why does light not slow down?

Clearly light bounces off of things, going really really fast. I'm curious to understand how light interacts with matter in order to bounce without: Applying force to the object Losing speed So my ...
5
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1answer
998 views

Is a photon technically a set of two particles?

When looking at the classification of massless particles, one finds that there is the (half-integer) quantum number "helicity" $h$. For every possible $h$ there is a certain particle kind. In the case ...
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2answers
56 views

Number of different wavelengths in the visible spectrum reaching Earth

I recognize the visible wavelengths of light extend from approximately 400 - 700 nm. But how many different wavelengths exist in that range? 300 ? 30,000 ? (400.01 - 699.99) If it's completely ...
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1answer
150 views

Relation between number of photons and energy?

Please can anyone explain it. If number of photons are increased will it increase the providing energy. Suppose, we are sending a limited number of photons each carrying energy. We have a energy ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Does light have a gravitational pull? [duplicate]

I understand that everything with mass does have a gravitational pull no matter how small the object, which means even a grain of sand has a gravitational pull. But light is something that exists, ...
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1answer
115 views

What is the speed of a Photon? [duplicate]

How fast does a Photon travel through space? And is gravity able to influence a Photon's path?
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1answer
39 views

where does the kinetic energy of electron revolving in nucleus go when photoelectric effect takes place?

we all have been studying that when photon is incident on alkali metal surface, photo currents are created due to ejection of electron after exceeding the work function.but the electron do have ...
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3answers
124 views

How can a photon have a frequency but not a phase?

When a single photon is emitted as a result of relaxation of an electronic energy level, it (the field) is clearly in a Fock state because it has a well-defined number of quanta. By the uncertainty ...