"Photon" is the name given to particles of light in the quantum mechanical understanding. In interaction where the classical and quantum mechanical understandings of light agree they are fully equivalent to electromagnetic waves.

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Why is there a photon every millimeter on earth coming from a star millions of light years away?

I've been having this confusing thought for so long now it would be amazing if someone could answer me. Imagine this asterisk * . As you see, from the center point, lines go outwards, just like a ...
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What happens when a photon hits a mirror?

When a photon of light hits a mirror does the exact same photon of light bounce back or is it absorbed then one with the same properties emitted? If the same one is bounced back does it's velocity ...
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polarization and frequency of a single photon

I believe that we can take a single photon state as a tensor product of a frequency Hilbert space (infinite dimension) and a polarization Hilbert space (dim 2). Does this mean we can measure the ...
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Does the uncertainty principle apply to photons?

Wikipedia claims the following: More generally, the normal concept of a Schrödinger probability wave function cannot be applied to photons. Being massless, they cannot be localized without being ...
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176 views

Is it possible to change the path of a single photon?

In other words, if a photon is emitted from source, is it possible to change its course en route either by introducing a gravitational lensing or some sort to change the road it travels (spacetime) ...
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501 views

Photons and uncertainty principle

Let's assume we have a perfect single-photon source: a device emitting exactly one photon at a time, with defined energy and direction. Let's shoot a photon: we know exactly the position of the photon ...
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Why do photons add mass to a black hole?

Why do photons add mass to a black hole? When photons are taken irreversibly into a black hole does the mass of the BH increase?
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Why do photons travel?

Photons travel at the speed of light. Is there a known explanation of this phenomenon, and if yes, what is it? Edit: To be clearer, my question is why do photons travel at all. Why do they have a ...
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How is light affected by gravity?

Light is clearly affected by gravity, just think about a black hole, but light supposedly has no mass and gravity only affects objects with mass. On the other hand, if light does have mass then ...
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Expression for the (relativistic) mass of the photon [closed]

I started learning a bit ahead from an old physics book, and they were discussing the photoelectric effect and after that Planck's hypotheses and energy quantas. The book said that the mass of a ...
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235 views

The electron jumps and lets loose photons

Where is the source of the photon. If the photon propagates from within the electrons transit does this point to some sort of field? Does the energy come from a boundary being broken in laymens ...
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192 views

Photoelectric effect without light rays

For electromagnetic waves we have the photon association, one imagines light as particles "flying around". What is the analogy for a constant electrical field, one which doesn't change in time ...
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Compton scattering angle

Say a photon hits a free electron at rest. I understand that there is a formula for the Compton scattering when the photon is scattered with an angle $\theta$, but I don't understand what determines ...
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Compton scattering vs. photoelectric effect

Say a photon hits some atom. What determines whether there will be a photoelectric effect (photon is absorbed, electron is released) or whether there will be a Compton scattering (the photon is ...
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If electromagnetic fields give charge to particles, do photons carry charge?

As I understand these two statements: An electromagnetic field gives particles charge A photon is a quantum of electromagnetic field It must mean that a photon carries charge. But I guess it isn't ...
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How do photons travel at a speed that should be impossible to attain?

If it requires infinite amount of energy to travel at the speed of light then how photon attains this speed? Its source is never infinitely sourced.
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PV cell for invisible spectrum only

Is it possible to make a photovoltaic cell that would only absorb the invisible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, while letting visible light pass through or bounce off its surface? I guess that ...
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Is it possible to send a single photon from a distant planet (say Mars) and detect its arrival at a site on Earth?

My question is specifically whether there exists a technique by which a single photon can be "tagged" or "encoded" in such a way that it can traverse our atmosphere and arrive at some sort of detector ...
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polarization - quantum point of view

polarization could be easily imagined in classical model: direction of E vector. is there any simple image for polarization of single photon?
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Does this photon emission problem even make sense?

I came across this question in an introductory physics course awhile back and I never got over it: "A hydrogen atom has an electron in the n=5 orbit, what is the maximum number of photons that might ...
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Can a photon be made to orbit a known (or undiscovered theoretical) body?

Can a photon through some process be made to orbit a celestial or any other object? Two follow-up questions. Can this orbit be described as the photon crossing its own path. Will this ...
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Is it possible to create an entangled pair of photons if they originate initially from operations at two separate sites?

My question is whether or not it would be possible to create an entangled state between two photons that do not share the same initial photon source and their respective sources are separated by an ...
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Frequency and wavelength of photons

I try to better understand how electromagnetic radiation works. So I have some questions. If an antenna emits at 100MHz (the charges on the antenna oscillate at 100MHz) what frequency will have the ...
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469 views

Electron model under Maxwell's theory

I was not able to recall my memories, so: What is the formula that states the frequency of electrons revolving around nucleus is equal to the frequency of light (or photon) emitted (or radiated)? (I ...
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Does $p=mc$ hold for photons?

Known that $E=hf$, $p=hf/c=h/\lambda$, then if $p=mc$, where $m$ is the (relativistic) mass, then $E=mc^2$ follows directly as an algebraic fact. Is this the case?
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Compton scattering multiple wavelengths?

The formula given for compton scattering shows that when x-ray of one specific wavelength hits carbon or some materials, emitted x-ray will be of one new specific wavelength. However, according to ...
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Does light photons have jerk? [duplicate]

While searching in web regarding whether rate of change of acceleration is possible or not; I came across the concept of jerk. I want to know whether photons which can be accelerated can also have ...
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What are electromagnetic fields made of?

I am trying to understand electromagnetic fields so I have two question related to them. What is a electromagnetic field made of? Is it made of photons / virtual photons? How about a static electric ...
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How does one calculate the quantum propagator for a massless photon

So I want to calculate the quantum massless photon propagator. To do this, I write $$ A_\mu(x) = \sum\limits_{i=1}^2 \int \frac{d^3p}{(2\pi)^3} \frac{1}{\sqrt{2\omega_p}} \left( \epsilon_\mu^i (p) ...
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Why/how does an electron emit a photon when decelerating?

I've had two special relativity courses so far but none really gave me a clear description of the process.
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Why does photon have only two possible eigenvalues of helicity?

Photon is a spin-1 particle. Were it massive, its spin projected along some direction would be either 1, -1, or 0. But photons can only be in an eigenstate of $S_z$ with eigenvalue $\pm 1$ (z as the ...
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Computing gravitational deflection of light knowing $\phi$ and $-\nabla \phi$?

I have a 3D cartesian grid an in each grid I know the gravitational potential $\phi$ and the 3D gravitational field $-\nabla \phi$ (with a Newtonian approach). How to compute the path of a photon in ...
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Exist some relationship between irradiance units and wavelenght of the incident sunlight?

Exist some relationship between irradiance units and wavelength of the incident sunlight? What about irradiance? I want to establish a relationship between wavelength and irradiance, because I would ...
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Will photon's energy be exactly same after million years?

If photon will travel for million years without collisions, what subtle effects can be accumulated ? Gravity fields affect trajectory, but is energy completely intact after fly by ? Photon has its ...
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How can a Photon have a “frequency”?

I picture light ray as a composition of photons with an energy equal to the frequency of the light ray according to $E=hf$. Is this the good way to picture this? Although I can solve elementary ...
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Optical Tunneling

Is there light tunneling taking place in optically transparent mediums like glass? wherein light travels a larger path in these mediums without interacting with atoms and without any change in ...
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Can electrons change the frequency of light as they bounce off/around?

I know that light does not interact with other light, but can interfere it, at least its amplitude. With that said, lights frequency can be changed via bouncing off matter, where matter might absorb ...
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Does the mass of a body absorbing photons increase?

Let's say I have a photon collector in orbit around the sun. It manages to collect photons perfectly efficiently, that is, without radiating off any energy. Then, using Einstein's equation: $$E = m ...
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Massless particle as a result of annihilation of “heavy” particles

How can a massless particle such a photon be the result of electron-positron annihilation? What about the law of conservation of energy? Is a valid explanation that the pair's energy transforms itself ...
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observation and implied time since creation

I read on a post Big Bang and Cosmic microwave background radiation? We detect light from another 13 billion years ago does this mean that one billion years ago we could only detect light from about ...
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Can the spin of a photon change during its “life”?

Or is the spin set in one of two possible states at its moment of creation and does not change for the rest of the duration of its "life"?
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Producing photons with same frequency, different amplitude wave

I don't understand how two photons of the same frequency can have different amplitudes, neither how to produce them. I know that classically the square of the amplitude is proportional to the energy, ...
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Is a photon “fixed in spacetime”?

From what I've read, according to relativity, a photon does not "experience" the passage of time. (Can we say there is no past/present/future for a photon?) Would it be better to say a photon is ...
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Does the passage of time effect a photons entanglement with another?

I recently read an article about "Delayed-choice entanglement swapping". Here is an excerpt from the article: Delayed-choice entanglement swapping consists of the following steps. (I use the ...
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Why do we use Planck's constant?

I have been trying to reason why energy packets (i.e. photons) are assumed to be quantized. I know this originated from Max Planck, but may someone explain why energy couldn't be emitted continuously ...
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Is there a point interaction model of the electron?

Is there a point interaction model of the electron? Is there a point interaction model of the electron? I imagine something like $\propto(\bar \psi\psi)^2$ (edited). Is such a thing in use? Since I ...
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How do we know that internal conversion creates no intermediate photon?

I've read, from several sources, that in internal conversion -- an excited electron transferring its energy to another electron which is then emitted -- no intermediate gamma radiation is produced. ...
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If the EM Spectrum makes up all frequencies what is the connection between Photons and Electrons in electronics, mainly in RF Propagation?

I am trying to sort out my understanding regarding Photons. I understand the Electromagnetic Spectrum contains all radiation (energy) in all wavelengths (light) consisting of Photons. This can be ...
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Why don’t photons interact with the Higgs field?

Why don’t photons interact with the Higgs field and hence remain massless?
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Computing the path of photons near a black hole

For a simulation, I want to compute the path that light follows near a black hole. Non-relativistically, a massive point particle in a central newtonian gravitational field follows either an ellipse, ...