1
vote
0answers
26 views

What is DX technology and what are the effects on digital cameras?

I am photographing in a high power voltage field in Industry producing aluminium, called DX technology. How do I know if my digital camera will not be affected? At 350kA current my film cameras were ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

Photons, electomagnetism

I read that photons are carriers of the electromagnetic force (one of the four fundamental forces). So, I would like to know what a photon has to do with, for example, working of a motor or ...
5
votes
2answers
513 views

Is there a relationship between the energy of a photon and the energy of an electromagnetic wave?

If the energy of a photon $E_{p}=hv$ And the energy of an electromagnetic wave is $E_{w}\propto \hat{\mathbf B}^2$ What is the relationship between $E_{w}$ and $E_{p}$?
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Electric charge of light? [duplicate]

Light (or any radiation as a matter of fact) is an electromagnetic wave so why doesn't it have a electric charge associated with it? As far as I know only static or flowing electric chargers can ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

No photon interaction in free space

How can the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect (photon bunching) be explained if photons don't interact in free space? To explain it with the influence of the two photons on the two detectors ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Can various wavelengths participate in C/D Interference?

My question is can multiple wavelengths or at least two different wavelengths interfere with one another? I know that they usually have to be the 'same' wavelength, but you'd think they can vary a bit ...
0
votes
4answers
173 views

Sequence of E and B field in radio waves and in single photons

In antenna technology we distinguish between nearfield and widefield. In the nearfield the electric and the magnetic fields are shifted by 90°. If you look closer you can see that there are two ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

What is the relationship between the electric field E and the magnetic field (aka magnetic flux density, magnetic induction) B of a single photon? [duplicate]

I'm looking for a formula for light, for example with 660 nm wavelength, which describes the maximum of the amplitudes for the wavelength of the electric and the magnetic field of the propagating ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Faraday Effect does light bend or lose energy?

I was reading upon Faraday effect when it said Faraday effect causes a rotation of the plane of polarization That in mind, does this mean the light can be bent around or does the light loose ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Collision of light waves & matter

When light or electromagnetic wave hits an obstacle, what happens? Are the reactions times always negligible? By reaction I mean all that happens after the hit like reflection for example.
4
votes
1answer
106 views

Electromagnetic Field VS Photons [duplicate]

I am currently studying electrodynamics with all the fields and the like. Now, as I understand it, in a more modern viewpoint there is a duality between electromagnetic fields and photons, with ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

EM field from the electrons on the surface of a body and their influence to moving particles

Under this question quantum field theoretic models of decoherence @DanielSank gave a wonderful answer. Can I implement his answer to every material body? What about I'm thinking is that on the surface ...
1
vote
1answer
145 views

Are there new concepts for the explanation of the wave-particle duality?

Whenever we can observe photons immediate, they are particles. That includes that photons have a inner structure with periodically varying electric and magnetic fields. The EM field of a radio antenna ...
-3
votes
1answer
41 views

Can a classical (or quantum) field, particularly the EMF, have a frame of reference?

I understand that a massless particle (such as a photon) cannot have a frame of reference. But the electromagnetic field does have mass; does it have a frame of reference? If so, I have a second ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Relationship between material and fringes behind an edge

The double-slit experiment shows fringes on a screen. Closing one of the slits there is still an interference pattern on the screen behind the slit. Making the slit wider we still see fringes between ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Do plasmons depend on the ambient EM field?

Imagine a situation: There's an illuminated metal slab in vacuum. Normally, there are some plasmons created running all over the slab. What would happen if we had turned a giant magnet near the slab? ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

How do the single photon energy and em-signal energy correlate? [duplicate]

If the photon (as a quantum of the electromagnetic field) has no defined(?) amplitude, how does (or where from?) the electromagnetic wave's amplitude appear? The formulation of the question is not ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Energy in an electromagnetic wave

A radio antenna creates EM waves through switching the polarization in the antenna at a certain frequency. I assume the the energy of the photons produced in this process amount to E=hf for each ...
2
votes
1answer
146 views

Is every electromagnetic radiation considered “light”?

Somebody mentioned on Freenode chatroom for physics that All Electromagnetic Radiation are delivered in form of Photons not just light. Is it true? Does that mean if we get a THF electrical ...
2
votes
2answers
98 views

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container?

Suppose a light wave with wavelength 3m. What happens if one tries to contain that wave within a 1m container? If I'm going about this entirely the wrong way or have wrong conceptions about light ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

What is the significance of the difference in the eigenvalue equations of Bloch functions for electrons vs photons?

any text on photonic crystals will highlight the almost perfect analogy between electrons in a periodic potential and photons in a periodic dielectric. The analogies are: $$V(\vec r + \vec R) = ...
3
votes
2answers
158 views

What is the energy distribution of light if it has an infinite length?

What is the energy distribution of light if it has an infinite length? I have read in one of the answers here on phys.SE that light has actually an infinite length. But then what is the energy ...
3
votes
1answer
801 views

What force particle mediates electric fields and magnetic fields?

The force carrier for magnetic fields and electric fields are supposedly photons. I don't get it: 1) Wouldn't that mean that a charged particle (e.g. an electron or even a polarized H2O molecule) ...
1
vote
1answer
198 views
1
vote
1answer
376 views

Physical Interpretation of Poynting Vector

I'm looking for a physical interpretation of the Poynting Vector. I understand that it should be thought of as an energy flow due to the electromagnetic field, but would I be correct in saying that in ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

How do virtual-photons curve in a magetic field?

From what I understand photons only move in straight lines unless reflected or refracted (other than influences from gravitational fields and their usual wavelike movement). And since they are a ...
8
votes
2answers
498 views

No magnetic dipole moment for photon

Electrically neutral particles such as neutrinos can have nonvanishing magnetic dipole moments. Spin-1 particles, e.g., deuterium nuclei, can also have dipole moments. Googling seems to show that the ...
3
votes
2answers
363 views

Electromagnetic Momentum

My book says : The fact that electromagnetic radiation of energy carried momentum was known from classical theory and from the experiments of Nichols and Hull in 1903. This relation is also consistent ...
2
votes
1answer
313 views

Can a force stop a Photon since Photons have momentum and What does momentum mean when talking about massless particles?

Momentum measures how hard it is to stop an object. While Photons are massless they still have relativistic mass and energy. My question is can something stop photons other than being absorbed by ...
1
vote
2answers
136 views

Is it possible for a photon to be at rest? [duplicate]

I know it doesn't really make sense if looking at the photon from the wave point of view, but is there any law of physics which prohibits a photon from stopping completely? Thanks.
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Photon propagation direction prediction possible after interacting with neutral hydrogen?

My current line of research deals a lot with hydrogen's Lyman-alpha emission and subsequent interactions of the Lyman-alpha photons with the surrounding hydrogen gas. My question is whether ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Where is the amplitude of electromagnetic waves in the equation of energy of e/m waves? [duplicate]

Does the amplitude of the photon oscillations always stay constant and if it is not - what are the physical differences between the photon with higher amplitude in comparison to the one with the less ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

EM Waves Energy Loss

Where does the energy go when two photons interfere destructively at a point on a screen in Young's double slit experiment ?
10
votes
1answer
374 views

How the inverse square law in electrodynamics is related to photon mass?

I have read somewhere that one of the tests of the inverse square law is to assume nonzero mass for photon and then, by finding a maximum limit for it , determine a maximum possible error in ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Do protons exchange photons with electrons?

I'm sorry for this question but, I just don't get it. According to the electromagnetic field theory, electrons repel each other by exchanging photons. How do protons attract electrons, by photon ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

Absorption cross section for direct dissociation and predissociation - Photoelectric absorption

Why the absorption cross section in direct dissociation process is wide and structureless while the absorption cross section in the predissociation process is structured and containing lines which are ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Collision of two photons

Could someone explain me how will be look like collision of two photons? Will they behave like: Electromagnetic waves, they will interpher with each other and keep they wave nature Particles and ...
0
votes
1answer
199 views

Thermionic emission and delayed emission

I want to understand the concepts behind the thermionic emission. In thermionic emission, the energy randomization occurs and the energy may be split to electronic or roto-vibrational states. If this ...
3
votes
2answers
252 views

What is a photon's speed inside a dieletric?

We know that EM waves are slowed down in a dielectric. But at what speed does the photons that make up the wave travel? Do they always travel at the speed $c$, but colliding/being absorbed and ...
2
votes
2answers
826 views

How photons move along with EM wave?

So the wave moves like. a wave, it moves up and down, up and down. But how do photons move? Do they follow the same path or do they just go straight forward without oscillating?
3
votes
2answers
304 views

Does the electromagnetic field “spin”?

Due to electron "spin", a small magnetic field is produced. Maxwell's equations imply that magnetic fields are due to changes in electric fields. Is the magnetic field produced then because the ...
9
votes
1answer
686 views

Why is there a photon every millimeter on earth coming from a star millions of light years away?

I've been having this confusing thought for so long now it would be amazing if someone could answer me. Imagine this asterisk * . As you see, from the center point, lines go outwards, just like a ...
2
votes
3answers
752 views

If electromagnetic fields give charge to particles, do photons carry charge?

As I understand these two statements: An electromagnetic field gives particles charge A photon is a quantum of electromagnetic field It must mean that a photon carries charge. But I guess it isn't ...
3
votes
2answers
686 views

Frequency and wavelength of photons

I try to better understand how electromagnetic radiation works. So I have some questions. If an antenna emits at 100MHz (the charges on the antenna oscillate at 100MHz) what frequency will have the ...
2
votes
2answers
475 views

Electron model under Maxwell's theory

I was not able to recall my memories, so: What is the formula that states the frequency of electrons revolving around nucleus is equal to the frequency of light (or photon) emitted (or radiated)? (I ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

What are electromagnetic fields made of?

I am trying to understand electromagnetic fields so I have two question related to them. What is a electromagnetic field made of? Is it made of photons / virtual photons? How about a static electric ...
2
votes
1answer
171 views

Can unbound electrons jump energy levels?

If an unbound electron (or indeed any charged particle) is moving through free space, is there a probability that it can spontaneously change energy by emitting a photon, or does this require the ...
4
votes
3answers
651 views

Is photon emission possible without electrons changing energy levels?

Does molecular vibrational transition and consequent emission of infrared radiation involve electrons changing energy level? In wikipedia, about vibronic transitions it says "Most processes leading to ...
2
votes
1answer
187 views

For someone who only studied electromagnetism, what is the modern way to explain electromagnetic fields?

After reading most of the electromagnetism chapters of Feynman's lectures on physics, I would like to understand in more detail, at least an idea, of what causes the electromagnetic fields. Not sure ...
1
vote
1answer
162 views

The energy carried from one winding of a transformer to another, in quantum terms

I have read in wikipedia this statement "The energy carried from one winding of a transformer to another, in quantum terms is carried by virtual photons, not real photons" (wikipedia src: virtual ...