5
votes
2answers
369 views

How many subatomic particles can absorb/emit photons?

Is the electron the only subatomic particle that can absorb and emit a photon?
5
votes
3answers
722 views

Why aren't all photons virtual particles even in the “vacuum” of empty space? [duplicate]

I'm thoroughly confused about the nature of electromagnetic radiation. Light is supposed to exhibit both wave and particle characteristics. But does that mean that it is both a wave and a particle or ...
-3
votes
1answer
41 views

Can a classical (or quantum) field, particularly the EMF, have a frame of reference?

I understand that a massless particle (such as a photon) cannot have a frame of reference. But the electromagnetic field does have mass; does it have a frame of reference? If so, I have a second ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

Photon Angular Momentum

Essentially I am wanting to evaluate $$\langle j\, m \mid a^\dagger(\mathbf{k}, \lambda) \mid 0 \rangle \,,$$ where $\lambda$ indicates the circular polarization (about $\mathbf{k}$). We have that ...
4
votes
1answer
99 views

If a photon's emission is detected is it real or virtual?

I understand that one can measure a single photon being absorbed using a photomultiplier tube or CCD. Can one measure a single photon being emitted by monitoring the current through an LED or the ...
8
votes
1answer
215 views

Sign in the photon propagator

The Klein Gordon propagator is given (I use Peskin and Schroeder's conventions, if it matters...), \begin{equation} \frac{ i }{ p ^2 - m ^2 + i \epsilon } \end{equation} The photon propagator ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Dual photon in d=3

In some papers (such as http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/9910184 and http://arxiv.org/find/all/1/all:+AND+kapustin+AND+topological+disorder/0/1/0/all/0/1) I am reading it is always referred at "the dual ...
0
votes
0answers
111 views

Degrees of freedom of the photon in $d=n$

It is well known that in ordinary $4$ dimension, the photon has on shell only two physical degrees of freedom. Physically this means its elicity is either $\lambda=+1$ or $\lambda=-1$ but cannot ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

Why is photon annihilation associated with the POSITIVE frequency component of the electric field?

I'm reading Glauber's paper "The quantum theory of optical coherence". In his work he does not introduce the annihilation and creation operators, but he refers instead to the positive and negative ...
1
vote
1answer
191 views
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Do all massless particles (e.g. photon, graviton, gluon) necessarily have the same speed $c$?

I suppose there was a discussion already on speed-of-gravity-and-speed-of-light. But I silly wonder whether all the massless mediators of four fundamental forces, i.e. Graviton: $g_{\mu\nu}$ ...
2
votes
0answers
93 views

How do we show that photons generated by a constant electric current are distributed according to a Poisson distribution?

I saw the answer sometimes ago in a book "Quantum Electronics" or similar title. I don't remember the author since I lost the book. The book sets ( I believe so ) a constant electric current $I$ in a ...
0
votes
1answer
255 views

Where do the photons mediating the electromagnetic force come from?

The electromagnetic field is mediated by photons (energy quanta). Its range is infinite, the interaction only weakens quadratically with distance due to the area of an expanding virtual sphere. Where ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

Does classical axial current conservation prevent the spontaneous emission of a photon by an electron?

I understand the axial current conservation (in the massless limit) in classial field theory to mean that the difference between right handed and left handed electrons is conserved in QED. $$j^{\mu ...
4
votes
1answer
132 views

LSZ theorem for photons

Is there any discussion on what the LSZ theorem for photons looks like? I would rather like a discussion of this in axial gauge $A_0 = 0$ (instead of the usual Lorenz gauge), but anything would do.
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Casimir Effect and polarization of photons

I have read Casimir's derivation of the Casimir fore between 2 parallel plates and have been told that in reality, the Casimir force should be twice as large due to the 2 polarization states of ...
8
votes
2answers
442 views

No magnetic dipole moment for photon

Electrically neutral particles such as neutrinos can have nonvanishing magnetic dipole moments. Spin-1 particles, e.g., deuterium nuclei, can also have dipole moments. Googling seems to show that the ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

If photons carry 1 spin unit, why does visible light seem to have no angular momentum?

Spin 1 silver atoms have a definite spin axis, e.g. up or down along an axis labeled X. This in turn means that they carry angular momentum in an overt, visible fashion. However, spin 1 photons do ...
3
votes
1answer
214 views

Photon mass and life time

In this article, the author tried to explain that, Einstein's theory may not valid because he says "photon can decay because it may have minute amount of mass". I'm totally in a conundrum state that ...
2
votes
0answers
147 views

Adiabatic quantum evolution of single photon or biphoton system

The prerequisite for adiabatic quantum evolution of single photon or biphoton system is as follows. We have to prepare a single photon or biphoton quantum system which has a ground and a higher level ...
6
votes
2answers
916 views

Virtual photons, what makes them virtual?

The wikipedia page "Force Carrier" says: The electromagnetic force can be described by the exchange of virtual photons. The virtual photon thing baffles me a little. I get that virtual particles ...
23
votes
5answers
2k views

Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?

Lamb 1969 states, A misconception which most physicists acquire in their formative years is that the photoelectric effect requires the quantization of the electromagnetic field for its ...
10
votes
2answers
391 views

Born rule for photons: it works, but it shouldn't?

We can observe double-slit diffraction with photons, with light of such low intensity that only one photon is ever in flight at one time. On a sensitive CCD, each photon is observed at exactly one ...
6
votes
2answers
264 views

Mass gap for photons

I am puzzled by the answers to the question: What is a mass gap? There, Ron Maimon's answer gives a clear-cut definition, which I suppose applies to any quantum field theory with Hamiltonian $H$, ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Collision of two photons

Could someone explain me how will be look like collision of two photons? Will they behave like: Electromagnetic waves, they will interpher with each other and keep they wave nature Particles and ...
6
votes
3answers
395 views

What is the massless limit of massive electromagnetism?

Consider electromagnetism, an abelian gauge theory, with a massive photon. Is the massless limit equal to electromagnetism? What does it happen at the quantum level with the extra degree of freedom? ...
4
votes
1answer
263 views

What is a virtual photon pair?

When describing a black hole evaporation in the hawking black body radiation it is usually said that is due to a virtual photon pair, is it this what happens? And what is virtual photon pair, does the ...
0
votes
1answer
229 views

The electron jumps and lets loose photons

Where is the source of the photon. If the photon propagates from within the electrons transit does this point to some sort of field? Does the energy come from a boundary being broken in laymens ...
3
votes
0answers
324 views

How does one calculate the quantum propagator for a massless photon

So I want to calculate the quantum massless photon propagator. To do this, I write $$ A_\mu(x) = \sum\limits_{i=1}^2 \int \frac{d^3p}{(2\pi)^3} \frac{1}{\sqrt{2\omega_p}} \left( \epsilon_\mu^i (p) ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Is there a point interaction model of the electron?

Is there a point interaction model of the electron? Is there a point interaction model of the electron? I imagine something like $\propto(\bar \psi\psi)^2$ (edited). Is such a thing in use? Since I ...
10
votes
4answers
5k views

Why don’t photons interact with the Higgs field?

Why don’t photons interact with the Higgs field and hence remain massless?
0
votes
3answers
264 views

faster-than-c photons

As far as I know, according to quantum field theory, there are some photons that go faster than c, which is the speed of light in vacuum. However, there seems to be a paper and a corresponding ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Properties of the photon: Electric and Magnetic field components

Consider an electromagnetic wave of frequency $\nu$ interacting with a stationary charge placed at point $x$. My question concerns the consistency of two equally valid quantum-mechanical descriptions ...
33
votes
4answers
2k views

Scattering of light by light: experimental status

Scattering of light by light does not occur in the solutions of Maxwell's equations (since they are linear and EM waves obey superposition), but it is a prediction of QED (the most significant Feynman ...
18
votes
10answers
4k views

What equation describes the wavefunction of a single photon?

The Schrödinger equation describes the quantum mechanics of a single massive non-relativistic particle. The Dirac equation governs a single massive relativistic spin-½ particle. The photon is a ...