The photon is the quantum of the electromagnetic four-potential, and therefore the massless bosonic particle associated with the electromagnetic force, commonly also called the "particle of light". Use this tag for questions about the quantum-mechanical understanding of light and/or electromagnetic ...

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Why is it necessary to supply constant electricity to make a laser work?

As we know that in lasers there are excited atoms. When energy is provided in the form of light, heat or electricity to these atoms, these excited atoms after sometime go to a lower state of energy ...
3
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2answers
203 views

Double slit experiment with animals as observers

I was searching about the double slit experiment, reading and watching videos, etc. If I understood correctly, when they try to measure the photon it turns into particle. On the Youtube video ...
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57 views

Where does an LED use energy other than emitting light?

I have a quantum formula describing what kind of photon should be emitted by an LED depending on its voltage. Of course the colour is depending on the material, but every type of LED also needs its ...
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1answer
35 views

Would it be efficient to run a solar panel with laser?

Would it be efficient to run a solar panel with laser? I know this question is unsual as we are using electricity powered laser to run a solar panel. Actually i am paricipating in the Google Science ...
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1answer
29 views

Can a solar panel work with heat?

As we know that a solar panels due to the energy of light, but can we run a solar panel with the same amount of energy provided as heat?
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37 views

Questions About The Delayed Choice Quantum Eraser Experiment

from wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delayed_choice_quantum_eraser (4/20/2015) From the wikipedia article The experimental setup, described in detail in Kim et al.,1 is illustrated in ...
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1answer
59 views

Understanding the behavior of light/photons inside a Laser

I am trying to establish a model inside my head of how light behaves but find it hard with all the seemingly contradicting information. For example, electrons inside a Laser are raised to a higher ...
3
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2answers
140 views

How to interpret single photon interference when the two possible paths are different in length?

Here is my question. I struggle with the definition of single photon interference. Let’s assume we have a Michelson interferometer and the interference pattern we observe is a single photon result, ...
2
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1answer
114 views

If we go to space why isn't the temperature high? [duplicate]

We know that the temperature in space (which has vacuum) is low. If I go to space will I feel sweaty and hot or chilly? I think I will feel sweaty and hot because the radiation (UV, IR, etc) of the ...
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2answers
34 views

What is the maximum of information in a beam of light?

If I look at the space I can see the Andromeda Galaxy as a small dot in the sky. If I look through a telescope, I can see the spiral shape. If the saw right through a huge telescope, I could see a ...
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1answer
229 views

Is a photon always in a state of superposition while traveling through space?

In the double-slit experiment, we emit a photon that is in a state of superposition (wave form) which travels through both slits to interfere with itself. When we measure which slit it went through, ...
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4answers
65 views

Photon: speed and mass

Is it correct to think that the speed of light does not depend on the speed of light source because photons have no mass, so they have no the kind of inertia that is associated with mass, so they can ...
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1answer
47 views

Why does a real/virtual photon interact only with charged particle?

A photon is the force carrier of an electromagnetic wave and it consists of an electric and a magnetic field propagating through space at the speed of light in vacuum. It exhibits wave-particle ...
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63 views

Can a laser work forever if constant electricity is provided?

Can a laser work forever if constant electricity is provided? If we take a laser and provide it with constant electricity will the reactions in the semiconductor generate photons forever?
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1answer
63 views

4-momentum of massless photons

The time component of a particle's 4-momentum is $$ E'=\frac{E-up}{\sqrt{1-u^2/c^2}}\tag{1} $$ Now suppose it is photons that you are observing from a system moving at $u$ on a line towards ...
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1answer
59 views

How can electromagnetic waves be affected by gravity if photons have no mass? [duplicate]

I have found answers that say that gravity interferes with the oscillating electric and magnetic fields of the waves and others that say that since gravity is a bend in space-time, in which case the ...
0
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1answer
29 views

How does a photon drive out the electrons in a solar cell?

We know that solar cells work when a photon hits the n-type the photon's energy drives free the electrons in the n-type to generate a current. But we also know that when a photon hits the atoms it ...
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1answer
33 views

Sound waves and chromism?

I am definitely not a physicist, but I have a question related to Physics so I thought I'd give it a try. Please excuse my ignorance. :) I am somewhat familiar with the changes in color caused by ...
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0answers
22 views

How much energy does a PV cell need to work?

How much energy does a $1m^2$ photovolatic/solar cell need to work? Can it work using a bunch of Laser lights? Edit: Ok so this PV cell is $1m^2$ is dimesions. The N-type has silicon doped with ...
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1answer
20 views

Distinguishing between perfect rigid mirror and symmetrical universe

I have a relatively bizarre question which I'm not even fits into the category of mainstream physics, but here I go anyway. I want to consider two hypothetical situations. Then I want to see if there ...
5
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1answer
359 views

Why can't Compton scattering happen in leading order of perturbation theory?

Why is the matrix element of Compton scattering in leading order of perturbation theory equal to zero? Why can this process only be described in second order of perturbation theory, i.e. with exchange ...
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2answers
95 views

How can a photon have energy when its mass is zero? [duplicate]

How can a photon have energy when its mass is zero? According to Einstein's equation $E = mc^2$ energy depends on $mass*c^2$ Light has zero mass so the energy would be zero too but solar cells use ...
0
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1answer
72 views

How do solar panels generate infinite electricity?

We know that solar cells generate electricity utilizing the energy of the photon, but how can they generate electricity forever? In a n-type terminal we have the bond of silicon and phosphorous so ...
5
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2answers
73 views

Selection rule $\Delta S=0$: Why does a photon not interact with an electrons spin?

When talking about selection rules in atomic physics, many books state that the photon interacts with the electrons angular momentum such that that $\Delta l=\pm 1$. Absorbed/emitted photons exchange ...
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1answer
44 views

Do photons emitted from a LED show bunching?

If photons are emitted from a thermal source, we get photon bunching. For coherent radiation, the detection probability doesn't change after detecting a photon. For single photon sources, we get ...
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1answer
59 views

Probability of photon emission

If a photon of a given wavelength is absorbed by an electron (for simplicity, let's assume the electron has only one excited state), does the probability that the electron jumps to its excited state ...
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5answers
107 views

Is a single photon also a Maxwellian wave?

A photon is associated with the equations $h\nu$ and $\frac{hc}{\lambda}$. My book (Serway Modern Physics) says that Einstein explained the photoelectric effect by assuming that the classical ...
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3answers
102 views

Why would the curvature in space-time attract photons which have zero mass? [closed]

I know that we are surrounded by dark matter, does the dark matter affects space time ???and I know the reason for gravity according to explanations in general relativity. But all the explanation ...
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49 views

Do solar panels work forever?

Do solar panels generate electricity infinitely? IF YES then how do the electrons in the n-type which go to p-type then how do those electrons restore themselves. I mean in n-type terminal we have the ...
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2answers
22 views

Photoelectric effect and variation of current?

Say a photon of frequency $\nu_1$ strikes the metal, and we have certain kinetic energy which is stopped by $V_{stop1}$. Now for frequency $\nu_2$ for same metal it will have $V_{stop2}$. Now ...
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0answers
19 views

Energy-level choice for electron at photon emission [duplicate]

An electron absorb a photon and jumps to the last energy level.Now when it goes done,How does it choose which level it will step down to?.Also I've come to now that it can omit one step(e.g from 5th ...
2
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3answers
55 views

Moving objects using light

Photon do not have mass but they have momentum, can we use laser to pick up golf ball and hurl it several yards away without burning it into crisp?
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1answer
24 views

Photoelectric effect and work function relation

Let's consider the graph above for two metals $M_1$ and $M_2$ showing relation between photocurrent and potential. First question that I want to ask here is that how do you relate stopping ...
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3answers
100 views

Why can't light escape a blackhole? [duplicate]

Gravity attracts objects which have mass right. We know that light is massless so why does a black hole's gravity attract light?
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2answers
64 views

How does light oscillate?

Why do we say that electromagnetic wave is oscillating? Or does light propagate really in a wavy form like this image? What is making the photons oscillate and how is it oscillating is it ...
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Why doesn't light affect a compass?

In our daily life a lot of photons of visible light, infrared and radio etc move around us. We know that light is an electromagnetic radiation. So why doesn't that electromagnetic radiation affect a ...
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82 views

Does a photon travel in all directions?

For example i am standing and a beam of light is passing in front of me. I am able to see that beam of light so does it mean that photons are travelling in all directions other than the photons which ...
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4answers
124 views

In $1$-dimensional space, how would the gravity generated by an electron affect a photon moving away from the electron if the photon can’t slow down?

Suppose we had a universe obeying the same physical laws as our own. But it had only one spatial dimension (represented by the $x$ axis) and it was totally empty. There are just two point-like ...
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0answers
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Optics - Photodiodes - minimum photon energy that a photodiode will be sensitive to [closed]

I'm foraying into the world of photodiodes, and I'm trying to calculate the minimum photon energy required for the photodiode to be sensitive to. Symbolic expressions desired. Minimum detectable ...
0
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1answer
35 views

How does the photon differentiate between events?

As far as I know for a photon that's moving at the speed of light (obviously) time comes to a halt and space contracts to a point, making all travels instant from its perspective. Now this is the part ...
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2answers
990 views

In an electron-positron annihilation, in what direction are the photons released?

I read that, in an electron-positron annihilation, at least 2 photons are produced, because of the law of conservation of momentum. my question is: in what direction are those photons released? and ...
4
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3answers
276 views

Do photons lose energy due to gravitational redshift? If so, where does the lost energy go? [duplicate]

In the gravitational redshift, the frequency of photons radiated from some source is reduced. As the energy of a photon is given by $\hbar\omega$, if the frequency is reduced where is the lost energy? ...
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1answer
38 views

Photon propagator inverse

If i have the operator $D^{\mu\nu}=\partial^{\mu}\partial^{\nu}+m\epsilon^{\mu\alpha\nu}\partial_{\alpha}$. What's your inverse $(D^{\mu\nu})^{-1}$?
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Photons under pressure

Does it make sense for photons to be put under pressure, if so how would this be measured? I'm wondering because I would like to plug in $E = h\nu$ into the formula for enthalpy.
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2answers
104 views

How to count the number of modes/polarizations of a Gaussian field theory?

A Gaussian (free) field theory is described by a quadratic action of the field, e.g. $S=\int\psi^\dagger K\psi$ (or $S=\frac{1}{2}\int\phi^\intercal K\phi$ for real fields). Usually one just need to ...
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0answers
23 views

Does a superconducting coil need a minimum amount of electric current to be a superconducting magnet?

I'm not about that for a tiny amount of Cooper electrons perhaps we can't measure the magnetic field. I suppose that it needs some influental electric current below which the coil isn't a superfluid ...
4
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2answers
62 views

photon wave function, double slit, single photon source

There's an old argument by Newton and Wigner, that the photon as a massless particle can't have a position operator and therefore no position space wave function. How does this tie in with the double ...
2
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3answers
70 views

How does an Inductor “store” energy?

It seems to me that an electromagnetic field is nothing more than a collection of photons, which as I've heard, extends through space infinitely. Why is it, then, that an inductor such as simple ...
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Models of light

As far as I'm aware, there are two different (and almost contradictory) models that describe the behavior of light: light as a wave (EM), and light as a particle (QM). From what I've heard, depending ...
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Does photon polarization take place without scattering processes?

Behind two perpendicular crossed polarisation filters (for visible light) the intensity of light will be zero. After installing a third filter between the two others non parallel to each of them some ...