The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

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Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?

Lamb 1969 states, A misconception which most physicists acquire in their formative years is that the photoelectric effect requires the quantization of the electromagnetic field for its explanation....
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Is plant photosynthesis more efficient than solar panels?

Is photosynthesis more efficient than solar panels? If so, by how much?
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How would I calculate the work function of a metal?

In the photoelectric effect, the work function is the minimum amount of energy (per photon) needed to eject an electron from the surface of a metal. Is it possible to calculate this energy from the ...
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403 views

How is the Photoelectric Effect affected by Blue-Shifting

I was thinking about the Photoelectric Effect and Blue-Shifting when I came up with a thought experiment that I couldn't think of an answer for. The thought experiment is as follows: A metal plate is ...
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Compton scattering vs. photoelectric effect

Say a photon hits some atom. What determines whether there will be a photoelectric effect (photon is absorbed, electron is released) or whether there will be a Compton scattering (the photon is ...
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Does Tesla's photoelectric “solar cell” really work?

Tesla patented a device for gathering energy from light, using the photoelectric effect. (US 685,957 - Apparatus for the Utilization of Radiant Energy): Basically just a sheet of "highly polished ...
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Is there a way to calculate the photoelectric effect in QED via a Feynman diagram?

The photoelectric effect is the historic origin of the quantum particle description of light. From it we learn that when light is shone onto a metal single photons interact with single electrons in ...
6
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612 views

How is a CCD able to collect images in drastically different lighting conditions?

I have read the basics of how a digital camera works. As much as I have understood, the digital cameras have a device called a CCD on which photons coming from the lens are incident. The CCD then ...
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Does the photoelectric effect obey Ohm's law?

I've been reading about the photoelectric effect for my modern physics class, and I was confused about how Ohm's law works in relation to it. Let's say we have a photoelectric apparatus that simply ...
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What if all the electrons leave a metal?

I was studying photoelectric effect. Then I thought that what will happen if all the electrons from a metal piece come out as photoelectrons by using a light source of particular frequency? Will the ...
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Why do electrons in an atom 'fall' back to the ground state?

Why, after absorbing a photon does an atom's electron 'fall' back to its ground state (what causes it to immediately lose its absorbed energy)?
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What's the difference between the work function and ionisation energy?

In a particular textbook, the work function of a metal (in the context of the photoelectric effect) is defined as: the minimum amount of energy necessary to remove a free electron from the surface ...
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In the famous Einstein's Photoelectric effect, why does the intensity of light not raise the kinetic energy of the emitted electrons?

The work function of any metal is no doubt constant for it is related to electromagnetic attraction between electrons and protons. However on increasing the intensity of any light source the kinetic ...
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So why are photoelectric panels flat?

In this post Why not use our own light production to produce new energy instead of wasting it?, I naively asked if it was possible to also recycle our own lightning at night. someone, in his answer, ...
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428 views

Classical (or semi-classical) interpretation of photoelectric effect?

This site says that "it has recently been proven that the photoelectric effect can be interpreted classically (or at least semi-classically) in non-particle, wavelike terms". Is anyone familiar with ...
4
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1answer
339 views

Why don't metals disintergrate in light?

I've been learning about photoelectricity. An electron can gain the energy from a single photon, and if that energy is greater than the work function of the metal the electron can leave the metal. ...
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1answer
378 views

Photoelectric effect: Experimental Physics

Suppose you are doing an experiment to determine the work function of a metal.  You get $KE_1$, $\nu_1$ and $KE_2$, $\nu_2$.   We know that $KE = h\nu - W$ but when you solve the simultaneous ...
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1answer
109 views

Why are there multiple L-edges in X-ray photoionization?

In heavier elements, why are there multiple L-edges in photoionization? In the image below, what do $\rm{L_{I}}$, $\rm{L_{II}}$ and $\rm{L_{III}}$ stand for? In this handout, (page 141 Figure 7.13), ...
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92 views

Electrons motion

Some days ago, I was reading a very simple text about photoelectric phenomenon (at high school level) that this question came to mind. How do electrons move (for example during their translation from ...
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215 views

Photomagnetic effect

I just saw an article on wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photomagnetic_effect "This article appears to contain unverifiable speculation and unjustified claims. Information must be verifiable ...
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Light and momentum question? [duplicate]

Each photon of light bulb carries momentum. Why does the light bulb not recoil from conservation of momentum?
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What happens to the absorbed light energy?

When light comes across with a solid material, some of it is reflected, some of it passes through and some of it is absorbed. I understand the reflection and passing through, but I don't understand ...
3
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1answer
78 views

Has time lag been calculated?

Books says time lag in which an electron leave atom, in photoelectric effect, is negligible. Is this negligible value been calculated?
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347 views

Is Photoelectric Effect continuous or discrete?

I don't understand how electrons and photon interact with each other when a metal surface is illuminated with light. I've read that below a certain threshold frequency or wavelength of light, no ...
3
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What is the relation between photoelectric current and frequency of incident light?

I googled it a bit and found that photoelectric current is independent of frequency(of incident light). Some further look revealed that actually "saturation current" is independent of frequency.I ...
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What is basic difference between photoelectric effect and Compton effect?

What is basic difference between photoelectric effect and Compton effect? In both case a photon hits a loosely bound electron So whats the difference? We get current in photoelectric effect but not in ...
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Does laser light with less than the work function still ionise some atoms?

If a gas is illuminated with a laser of a frequency less than (but more than half of) the work function of the atoms in the gas, the atoms will be excited into Rydberg atoms. Is there a finite chance ...
3
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337 views

Can I use fluorescent light bulbs to calculate Planck's constant?

We did an experiment today to calculate Planck's constant, $h$. We measured the knee voltages $V$ of different LEDs (red, green, orange, blue, violet) and plotted them against the frequencies $f$ of ...
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Stopping potential in the photoelectric effect, collector work function

In this question I am talking about the following situation: Now, I know that the max kinetic energy of the electrons emitted is $KE_{max} = h\nu - e\phi_{em}$ where $\phi_{em}$ is the work ...
3
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1answer
173 views

In photo-electric experiment, if the light is exposed to a metal plate for a long enough interval, does the plate become lighter?

I know from the book that electrons will be kicked out from the metal plate if the light of appropriate wavelength is exposed to the metal plate. My mental model says if we let the light expose the ...
3
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1answer
76 views

Why is dark current on CCD devices pixel dependent

I'm reading about sources of noise in cameras while taking images - One of them is the dark current. That is, some electrons in the CCD device of a camera are set free due to thermal noise. Those free ...
3
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1answer
78 views

Why does one use different materials for cathode and anode in the photoelectric effect experiment

All photoeletric lab experiments I have seen so far have a setup where you have different materials for cathode and anode. However this raises some experimental difficulties since you have to take ...
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Relationship between stopping potential and work function

Suppose I have a cathode with a work function of 3eV and an anode at a potential of 2V above the cathode. If a photon having 2eV of energy hits the cathode, what happens? A. An electron is emitted ...
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550 views

How bright can we make a sun jar?

A sun jar is an object that stores solar energy in a battery and then releases it during dark hours through a led. Assume: a $65cm^2$ solar panel a 12h/12h light/dark cycle insolation of $2.61kWh/...
3
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Is the photoelectric effect 'Ionising Radiation'?

According to the definition on Wikipedia, ionising radiation is radiation which has sufficient energy to remove an electron from an atom. So a high energy gamma ray is definitely ionising, but visible ...
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what is the velocity distribution of photoelectrons in photoelectric effect?

I know that when light is incident on certain metallic surfaces, electrons are emitted from the surface. And I know that the maximum velocity can be calculated. But why does the textbooks use 'maximum ...
3
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4answers
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Why can't the wave model for radiation account for the photoelectric effect?

While I understand the effect of varying wavelength and frequencies on the photoelectric effect, I can't seem to turn my mind around that question... I suspect it has to do with quantas and the non ...
3
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How to distinguish Shake-Up Satellites from Plasmons?

I am studying XPS spectra (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) at the moment. In XPS, different processes can influence the final state energy of detected electrons. One of these processes is the ...
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What are thermal energy distributions?

I am trying to understand the photoelectric-effect deeply. My teacher used the Planck's law and integrated it to deduce the Stefan-Boltzmann law. He somehow showed some quantum-physical ...
2
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photoelectric effect

A 1.0 mW laser ($\lambda$ = 590 nm) shines on a cesium photocathode ($\phi = 1.95 \space eV$). Assume an efficiency of $10^{-5}$ for producing photoelectrons (that is, 1 photoelectron is produced for ...
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1answer
763 views

Photoelectric effect – Why does one electron absorb one photon?

When I read about the photoelectric effect, I came across this: "The electrons could not absorb more than one photon to escape from the surface, they could not therefore absorb one quanta and then ...
2
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Can one photon emit two electrons?

My question refers to the photoelectric effect. I have heard that it is possible, that for one photon, two electrons leave the irradiated metal. Is this correct and by which process can this be ...
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What happens to a metal plate in the photoelectric effect?

In the photoelectric effect the electrons are supposed to be removed from the plate if light of appropriate wavelength hits the plate. If electrons are removed, the plate should get ionized (...
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Photoelectric effect: Why is the saturation current the same, as you vary the frequency of incident light but keep its intensity constant?

image courtesy of http://www.learncbse.in/ Why is the saturation current the same, as you vary the frequency of incident light but keep its intensity constant? If intensity is a measure of the ...
2
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2answers
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Show that a photon cannot transmit its total energy to a free electron. Contradiction with Photoelectric effect?

This is a problem in my textbook and I've shown it this way: $E_{initial}=\frac{hc}{\lambda} + mc^2$ $p_{initial}=h/\lambda$ After collision with photon having zero energy we get $p_{final}=h/\...
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1answer
633 views

What happens when work function = hf

What happens when the photon which hits a metal surface has energy equal to the work function of that surface? $$\phi = hf$$ I realise the emitted electron will have no kinetic energy after escape, ...
2
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1answer
241 views

Ejected Electrons with 0 KE?

So I was taught that: Kinetic Energy (of electron) = Energy (of photon) - Ionization Energy If E(photon) = IE, then KE=0 of the electron. What does this physically/theoretically mean? My current ...
2
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5answers
218 views

Photoelectric effect without light rays

For electromagnetic waves we have the photon association, one imagines light as particles "flying around". What is the analogy for a constant electrical field, one which doesn't change in time ...
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Kinetic energy and Potential of a photon

How does the potential and kinetic energy of a photon relate? Do they mean the same thing? Also how does De broglie wavelength and Potential relate?
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Photoelectric effect stopping potential

$q_eV_s = hf - \phi$ My question is... suppose we are testing the photoelectric effect. One plate is illuminated. We have applied the stopping potential. Suppose an electron leaves one plate with $KE ...