The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

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problem with an mcq question on photoelectricity [on hold]

Hello guys I'm new here please what's the relationship between V potential f frequency and fo threshold frequency thanks In the mcq question we have A $V = a(f-f_o)$ B $V = a(f_o-f)$ C $V = a(f_o+...
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1answer
78 views

Why Doesn't Einstein Get More Credit for Being the Father of Quantum Theory? [on hold]

I'm not simply referring to the notion that Einstein treated the discrete emission and transference of energy (and matter) as "real" physical phenomena, but rather his major continuous role in the ...
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6answers
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In the famous Einstein's Photoelectric effect, why does the intensity of light not raise the kinetic energy of the emitted electrons?

The work function of any metal is no doubt constant for it is related to electromagnetic attraction between electrons and protons. However on increasing the intensity of any light source the kinetic ...
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1answer
329 views

Relationship Between Stopping Voltage and Photocurrent

Online, I found a graph of photocurrent vs. stopping voltage: And I can’t figure out how photocurrent and stopping voltage have such a relationship. Stopping voltage is proportional to maximum KE ...
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2answers
36 views

Why are photoelectrons emitted in the direction of incident photons?

In the experiments for photoelectric emission, the light is incident on one face of the emitting plate, for example the anode, when determining the stopping potential. The electrons are emitted by ...
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15 views

Photoelectric effect and evanescent fields

We all know that if light impinges upon a metal and if it's the energy of the photon (hv) is greater than the work function of the metal then an electron will become unbound from the metal and be ...
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2answers
53 views

Why , under constant light intensity and constant frequency, do electrons emitted from a metal surface travel at different speeds?

I was playing around with this PheT simulation: https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/photoelectric Under a certain threshold wavelength and an intensity at 20%, the electrons were being emitted ...
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1answer
37 views

Can a flow of current be produced in a wire if its is bombarded with Electromagnetic waves?

If you have a conducting wire and you bombarded it with EM waves, is there a frequency (lower then the threshold frequency to liberate the electrons) that would induce a current within the wire. I ...
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89 views

Electrons motion

Some days ago, I was reading a very simple text about photoelectric phenomenon (at high school level) that this question came to mind. How do electrons move (for example during their translation from ...
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2answers
196 views

Why did Albert Einstein receive a nobel prize? [closed]

We all know that he received the prize due to his explanation of photoelectric effect. But the photoelectric effect, it’s a mere 3-4 page topic and uses a simple equation that typically anyone can ...
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2answers
613 views

Is there a way to calculate the photoelectric effect in QED via a Feynman diagram?

The photoelectric effect is the historic origin of the quantum particle description of light. From it we learn that when light is shone onto a metal single photons interact with single electrons in ...
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2answers
134 views

Photoelectric effect

Why the photoelectric effect is observed only for metals and not for non-metals? Isn't it possible for the photon to release an electron from a non-metal surface?
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1answer
74 views

No photoelectron is emitted from which of the following metals?

So there was this multiple choice question in an exercise in a bookI'm reading. I know that the forum is about discussions. But I want to know what the answer to the question is and why it is so. ...
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4answers
143 views

Why can't the wave model for radiation account for the photoelectric effect?

While I understand the effect of varying wavelength and frequencies on the photoelectric effect, I can't seem to turn my mind around that question... I suspect it has to do with quantas and the non ...
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0answers
19 views

Database for work functions for exotic crystallographic faces

Is there a database, which holds work functions (found either from experiment or calculations) for some more exotic crystallographic faces, such as (221) or (311) for copper? I dug around and found ...
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2answers
35 views

Photoelectric effect and work function

In a photoelectric effect we remove electrons from a metal using high energy photons, the work function is the minimal energy required for this effect. My question is why doesnt the work fucntion ...
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1answer
34 views

In the photoelectric effect, what happens to the electron if the work function is too low?

I know that no electrons will be emitted from the atom if the threshold is not reached, but my professor is asking us what happens to an electron in this scenario. I asked if the electron would just ...
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1answer
30 views

Photoemission to measure band gaps?

Photoemission works by conservation of energy: $$\bar{h}\omega = E_{kin} + E_i + \phi$$, where $\bar{h}\omega$ is the incident photon, $E_{kin}$ is the measured kinetic energy of the ejected ...
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20 views

Calculating saturation current and energy associated with a band of wavelengths

Consider white light whose wavelength spread is from 400nm to 700nm. Its energy is uniformly distributed in this spectrum. The light is incident on metal A of work function 1.55eV. Saturation ...
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5answers
147 views

How to increase the frequency of light

If we want to increase the energy of the emitted photoelectrons (in P.E) then we should increase the energy of the photons which are related to the frequency of the light, so how is the frequency of ...
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1answer
398 views

How is the Photoelectric Effect affected by Blue-Shifting

I was thinking about the Photoelectric Effect and Blue-Shifting when I came up with a thought experiment that I couldn't think of an answer for. The thought experiment is as follows: A metal plate is ...
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1answer
302 views

Why doesn't photoelectric current increase with frequency of the incident wave?

If the frequency of the incident wave is increased, then the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons increases. If so, why doesn't the photoelectric current increase? If the kinetic energy of electrons ...
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1answer
27 views

What determines photoelectric yield

Is there any difference between the photoelectric yield of different metals apart from the threshold wavelength? To be more clear: Will metals with the same work function emit the same amount of ...
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1answer
40 views

Photoelectric effect on charged plate

As far as I know, to observe the photoelectric effect, one has to expose a metal surface to high-energy radiation. But what happens if the surface has a surplus of electrons? What is the energy needed ...
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2answers
37 views

Photoelectric effect and wave particle duality

In a vacuum, if electrons are accelerated by a certain voltage, giving the electrons a specific de Broglie wavelength and were incident on a piece of metal, providing the wavelength was roughly the ...
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2answers
66 views

Dependence of saturation current in photoelectric tube on the time taken by the electron to reach the opposite plate?

The kinetic energy of an electron in a photoelectric tube increases with increase in the applied voltage across the plates of the tube, thus the velocity of the electrons also increases. Accordingly ...
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1answer
51 views

Is the photoelectric effect 'Ionising Radiation'?

According to the definition on Wikipedia, ionising radiation is radiation which has sufficient energy to remove an electron from an atom. So a high energy gamma ray is definitely ionising, but visible ...
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54 views

Wave-like description of Compton scattering and photoelectric effect

I have found in the wikipedia page for QFT the following statement: ... Although the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering strongly suggest the existence of the photon, it is now understood ...
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52 views

Why call it a particle and not a wave pulse?

My physics textbook says that photoelectric emission provides conclusive evidence for the particle theory of light. Apparently, since photoelectric emission only works at certain frequencies, we can ...
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3answers
105 views

How does wave-particle duality describe Photoelectric effect?

I don't know if electrons work as particles or waves or maybe both in photoelectric effect. How is Photoelectric Effect actually described by Wave-Particle Duality?
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1answer
36 views

Thermionic emission

I have a pretty basic question regarding the beam of electrons as a result of thermionic emission. In an electron gun, the emitted electrons from the cathode become incident at a point on the other ...
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1answer
68 views

Why does one use different materials for cathode and anode in the photoelectric effect experiment

All photoeletric lab experiments I have seen so far have a setup where you have different materials for cathode and anode. However this raises some experimental difficulties since you have to take ...
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2answers
98 views

Photoelectric effect: Why is the saturation current the same, as you vary the frequency of incident light but keep its intensity constant?

image courtesy of http://www.learncbse.in/ Why is the saturation current the same, as you vary the frequency of incident light but keep its intensity constant? If intensity is a measure of the ...
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4answers
2k views

Saturation current in photoelectric effect

While studying photoelectric in my school, my teacher drew a graph of current versus the potential difference across the two electrodes: I am not able to understand why do we get saturation current....
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34 views

Photoelectric effect by cosmic radiation

In photoelectric effect, energy of photons are used to remove electrons from the atoms of the metal. Generally, energy of the photon determines the photoelectric current produced. But nuclear ...
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Relation between frequency and intensity of light

I was going through a question in photoelectric effect and it was a true/false which says that the intensity of the incident light gets doubled on doubling the frequency. The answer is given as true ...
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2answers
78 views

Why does lead have a higher attenuation coefficient for 5.0 MeV than for 10.0 MeV?

I was doing some calculations on radiation, and I noticed that lead has a higher attenuation coefficient for 5.0 MeV than for 10.0 MeV, namely $1.44 \, \mathrm{cm}^{-1}$ for the former and $1.23 \, \...
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1answer
25 views

The Photoelectric Effect in passive cooling?

Information on the Photoelectric Effect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect Summary: Some metals release electrons when struck by a certain frequency of photon. What does this mean ...
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2answers
333 views

Photoelectric effect stopping potential

$q_eV_s = hf - \phi$ My question is... suppose we are testing the photoelectric effect. One plate is illuminated. We have applied the stopping potential. Suppose an electron leaves one plate with $KE ...
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1answer
68 views

Why is dark current on CCD devices pixel dependent

I'm reading about sources of noise in cameras while taking images - One of them is the dark current. That is, some electrons in the CCD device of a camera are set free due to thermal noise. Those free ...
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4answers
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Stopping potential in the photoelectric effect, collector work function

In this question I am talking about the following situation: Now, I know that the max kinetic energy of the electrons emitted is $KE_{max} = h\nu - e\phi_{em}$ where $\phi_{em}$ is the work ...
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1answer
60 views

How is work function related to oxidation?

Low work function metals, such as Li and K, oxidize in ambient conditions, whereas high work function metals such as Au do not oxidize. In chemistry there's activation energy and reaction rate ...
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1answer
380 views

Is the current vs. frequency graph hyperbolic for the photoelectric effect?

Concerning the photoelectric effect: When the intensity and applied voltage are both constant, then the current is inversely proportional to frequency $f$ (above threshold frequency). If we increase $...
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35 views

Photon spin and photo electric effect

If a photon with spin angular momentum $+1$ with sufficient energy strikes an electron with spin $+1/2$, emission will take place. As angular momentum can't be conserved, what will happen?
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7 views

Solar cell using graphite

I recently heard that single graphite layer is developed so as to produce solar electricity. Is that possible. If so, then how is that process takes place?
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1answer
43 views

Number of photoelectrons vs Frequency

This is the graph plotted between photocurrent (proportional to number of photoelectrons) and potential applied with different frequencies. As it can be seen, the number of photoelectrons released ...
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3answers
68 views

Photocurrent's dependence on frequency [duplicate]

Sounds like a rookie question, this, but could someone please explain to me why doesn't photocurrent increase when we increase the frequency of the incident radiation? I mean, an increase in frequency ...
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2answers
95 views

Is their real difference between photoelectric and thermo ionic current?

All books say only a single photon can remove an electron at a time. But we see that during thermal emissions electrons are removed by heat waves which are actually infrared rays. These infrared rays ...
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1answer
189 views

What is the difference between the photoelectric effect and secondary emission?

What is the difference between photoelectric effect and secondary emission in photo multiplier tubes? In other words, why the difference between the energy of the incident photon and the work function ...
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6answers
13k views

Compton scattering vs. photoelectric effect

Say a photon hits some atom. What determines whether there will be a photoelectric effect (photon is absorbed, electron is released) or whether there will be a Compton scattering (the photon is ...