2
votes
1answer
50 views

What happens when work function = hf

What happens when the photon which hits a metal surface has energy equal to the work function of that surface? $$\phi = hf$$ I realise the emitted electron will have no kinetic energy after escape, ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

Stopping potential in the photoelectric effect, collector work function

In this question I am talking about the following situation: Now, I know that the max kinetic energy of the electrons emitted is $KE_{max} = h\nu - e\phi_{em}$ where $\phi_{em}$ is the work ...
6
votes
2answers
219 views

Why do electrons in an atom 'fall' back to the ground state?

Why, after absorbing a photon does an atom's electron 'fall' back to its ground state (what causes it to immediately lose its absorbed energy)?
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Do I need to take both particles' momentum into account in photoelectric emission? [closed]

An aluminum dust particle of mass $m=2.2*10^{-18}$ grams is floating in space ( initial velocity is zero). The particle emits electron under influence of a photon whose frequency is $8*10^{17}$ ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Why photon-electron energy transfer can't occur in steps or does it?

The process of exchange of energy between a photon and an electron only occur after a specific energy called work-function of the material. Thus, the energy transferred is quantised due to the fact ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

In famous Einsteins Photoelectric effect, Why does intensity of light doesn't raise the kinetic energy of the emitting electrons?

The work function of any metal is no doubt constant for it is related to electromagnetic attraction between electrons and protons. However on increasing the intensity of any light source the kinetic ...
21
votes
4answers
2k views

Can the photoelectric effect be explained without photons?

Lamb 1969 states, A misconception which most physicists acquire in their formative years is that the photoelectric effect requires the quantization of the electromagnetic field for its ...
2
votes
2answers
405 views

What are thermal energy distributions?

I am trying to understand the photoelectric-effect deeply. My teacher used the Planck's law and integrated it to deduce the Stefan-Boltzmann law. He somehow showed some quantum-physical ...
3
votes
1answer
260 views

Classical (or semi-classical) interpretation of photoelectric effect?

This site says that "it has recently been proven that the photoelectric effect can be interpreted classically (or at least semi-classically) in non-particle, wavelike terms". Is anyone familiar with ...
-3
votes
1answer
64 views

Assuming collision , are there fundamental forces associated with absorbtion?

I just learned that strong and weak nuclear forces relate to decay/emission. I know absorbtion depends on Energy levels(QM) and heat(thermodynamics , kinetic energy , entropy) and E = gamma mc^2 ( ...
6
votes
5answers
5k views

Compton scattering vs. photoelectric effect

Say a photon hits some atom. What determines whether there will be a photoelectric effect (photon is absorbed, electron is released) or whether there will be a Compton scattering (the photon is ...
1
vote
2answers
394 views

Is energy exchange quantized?

In the photoelectric effect there is a threshold frequency that must be exceeded, to observe any electron emission, I have two questions about this. I) Lower than threshold: What happen with lesser ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

photoelectric effect

A 1.0 mW laser ($\lambda$ = 590 nm) shines on a cesium photocathode (ϕ = 1.95 eV). Assume an efficiency of $10^{-5}$ for producing photoelectrons (that is, 1 photoelectron is produced for every 10^5 ...