The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

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Database for work functions for exotic crystallographic faces

Is there a database, which holds work functions (found either from experiment or calculations) for some more exotic crystallographic faces, such as (221) or (311) for copper? I dug around and found ...
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Photoelectric effect and work function

In a photoelectric effect we remove electrons from a metal using high energy photons, the work function is the minimal energy required for this effect. My question is why doesnt the work fucntion ...
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Calculating saturation current and energy associated with a band of wavelengths

Consider white light whose wavelength spread is from 400nm to 700nm. Its energy is uniformly distributed in this spectrum. The light is incident on metal A of work function 1.55eV. Saturation ...
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19 views

In the photoelectric effect, what happens to the electron if the work function is too low?

I know that no electrons will be emitted from the atom if the threshold is not reached, but my professor is asking us what happens to an electron in this scenario. I asked if the electron would just ...
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1answer
17 views

Photoemission to measure band gaps?

Photoemission works by conservation of energy: $$\bar{h}\omega = E_{kin} + E_i + \phi$$, where $\bar{h}\omega$ is the incident photon, $E_{kin}$ is the measured kinetic energy of the ejected ...
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4answers
114 views

Why can't the wave model for radiation account for the photoelectric effect?

While I understand the effect of varying wavelength and frequencies on the photoelectric effect, I can't seem to turn my mind around that question... I suspect it has to do with quantas and the non ...
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1answer
24 views

What determines photoelectric yield

Is there any difference between the photoelectric yield of different metals apart from the threshold wavelength? To be more clear: Will metals with the same work function emit the same amount of ...
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35 views

Photoelectric effect on charged plate

As far as I know, to observe the photoelectric effect, one has to expose a metal surface to high-energy radiation. But what happens if the surface has a surplus of electrons? What is the energy needed ...
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31 views

Photoelectric effect and wave particle duality

In a vacuum, if electrons are accelerated by a certain voltage, giving the electrons a specific de Broglie wavelength and were incident on a piece of metal, providing the wavelength was roughly the ...
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47 views

Is the photoelectric effect 'Ionising Radiation'?

According to the definition on Wikipedia, ionising radiation is radiation which has sufficient energy to remove an electron from an atom. So a high energy gamma ray is definitely ionising, but visible ...
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43 views

Why call it a particle and not a wave pulse?

My physics textbook says that photoelectric emission provides conclusive evidence for the particle theory of light. Apparently, since photoelectric emission only works at certain frequencies, we can ...
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3answers
98 views

How does wave-particle duality describe Photoelectric effect?

I don't know if electrons work as particles or waves or maybe both in photoelectric effect. How is Photoelectric Effect actually described by Wave-Particle Duality?
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32 views

Thermionic emission

I have a pretty basic question regarding the beam of electrons as a result of thermionic emission. In an electron gun, the emitted electrons from the cathode become incident at a point on the other ...
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Photoelectric effect: Why is the saturation current the same, as you vary the frequency of incident light but keep its intensity constant?

image courtesy of http://www.learncbse.in/ Why is the saturation current the same, as you vary the frequency of incident light but keep its intensity constant? If intensity is a measure of the ...
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28 views

Photoelectric effect by cosmic radiation

In photoelectric effect, energy of photons are used to remove electrons from the atoms of the metal. Generally, energy of the photon determines the photoelectric current produced. But nuclear ...
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65 views

Why does lead have a higher attenuation coefficient for 5.0 MeV than for 10.0 MeV?

I was doing some calculations on radiation, and I noticed that lead has a higher attenuation coefficient for 5.0 MeV than for 10.0 MeV, namely $1.44 \, \mathrm{cm}^{-1}$ for the former and $1.23 \, ...
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1answer
25 views

The Photoelectric Effect in passive cooling?

Information on the Photoelectric Effect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect Summary: Some metals release electrons when struck by a certain frequency of photon. What does this mean ...
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54 views

Why is dark current on CCD devices pixel dependent

I'm reading about sources of noise in cameras while taking images - One of them is the dark current. That is, some electrons in the CCD device of a camera are set free due to thermal noise. Those free ...
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1answer
43 views

How is work function related to oxidation?

Low work function metals, such as Li and K, oxidize in ambient conditions, whereas high work function metals such as Au do not oxidize. In chemistry there's activation energy and reaction rate ...
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Photon spin and photo electric effect

If a photon with spin angular momentum $+1$ with sufficient energy strikes an electron with spin $+1/2$, emission will take place. As angular momentum can't be conserved, what will happen?
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Why does one use different materials for cathode and anode in the photoelectric effect experiment

All photoeletric lab experiments I have seen so far have a setup where you have different materials for cathode and anode. However this raises some experimental difficulties since you have to take ...
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Solar cell using graphite

I recently heard that single graphite layer is developed so as to produce solar electricity. Is that possible. If so, then how is that process takes place?
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35 views

Number of photoelectrons vs Frequency

This is the graph plotted between photocurrent (proportional to number of photoelectrons) and potential applied with different frequencies. As it can be seen, the number of photoelectrons released ...
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3answers
53 views

Photocurrent's dependence on frequency [duplicate]

Sounds like a rookie question, this, but could someone please explain to me why doesn't photocurrent increase when we increase the frequency of the incident radiation? I mean, an increase in frequency ...
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1answer
44 views

Why work function is not identical to first ionization energy?

From Wikipedia: The ionization energy (IE) is qualitatively defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an isolated gaseous atom to form a cation. ...
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How can I calculate the bipartition angle for photoelectrons produced by photoelectric effect?

I'm taking a course in radiation physics and I'm studying the photoelectric effect. In the notes that he gave us my professor states that half of the emitted electrons are emitted forward with an ...
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158 views

Super massive Black Hole and photon reduction [closed]

This is a picture of 2 galaxies taken from The Hubble. The arrow shows a smaller galaxy's black hole starving of the usual stars because of the binary rotation about the bigger galaxy that is pulling ...
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2answers
82 views

What is basic difference between photoelectric effect and Compton effect?

What is basic difference between photoelectric effect and Compton effect? In both case a photon hits a loosely bound electron So whats the difference? We get current in photoelectric effect but not in ...
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5answers
124 views

How to increase the frequency of light

If we want to increase the energy of the emitted photoelectrons (in P.E) then we should increase the energy of the photons which are related to the frequency of the light, so how is the frequency of ...
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606 views

How is a CCD able to collect images in drastically different lighting conditions?

I have read the basics of how a digital camera works. As much as I have understood, the digital cameras have a device called a CCD on which photons coming from the lens are incident. The CCD then ...
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2answers
89 views

Is their real difference between photoelectric and thermo ionic current?

All books say only a single photon can remove an electron at a time. But we see that during thermal emissions electrons are removed by heat waves which are actually infrared rays. These infrared rays ...
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1answer
50 views

Has time lag been calculated?

Books says time lag in which an electron leave atom, in photoelectric effect, is negligible. Is this negligible value been calculated?
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How to measure the maximum kinetic energy of electrons emitted due to photoelectric effect?

From Einstein's photoelectric equation, $$hf = \phi + k.e_{\text{max}}$$ where $\phi$ is the work function of the metal. My question is : how to experimentally determine the kinetic energy of ...
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1answer
41 views

Why is there a longer time lag if light behaves as a wave?

In this problem: According to a model based on the electromagnetic theory of light, the electron absorbs all the energy that is incident on the surface within a distance of $5.0\times 10^{-11}\ ...
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1answer
49 views

So why are photoelectric panels flat? (Part II)

In this post So why are photoelectric panels flat?, I've asked if we could use flat photoelectric panels with hemispheric cells. Most of the answers seemed to say it would not work. Anyway, I'm ...
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So why are photoelectric panels flat?

In this post Why not use our own light production to produce new energy instead of wasting it?, I naively asked if it was possible to also recycle our own lightning at night. someone, in his answer, ...
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Why doesn't silicon emit light? [closed]

Why doesn't silicon re-emit light when light falls on it? Or if it emits light then why we can't see it?Hence it has valence electrons.
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Why not 2, 3, 4, or more photons can be absorbed by single electron? [duplicate]

During Photoelectric effect and other such phenomenon, when light is made to fall on metal surface, single photon is absorbed by the single electron present in metal atom. Why not 2, 3, 4, or more ...
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27 views

Extraction efficiency in photoeffect

I am looking at the extraction efficiency of the photoeffect (how many electrons end up in vacuum per photon). I have read in this forum that 1e-5 or less electrons make it outside of metal. Reason is ...
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54 views

Does laser light with less than the work function still ionise some atoms?

If a gas is illuminated with a laser of a frequency less than (but more than half of) the work function of the atoms in the gas, the atoms will be excited into Rydberg atoms. Is there a finite chance ...
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104 views

Photoelectric effect

Why the photoelectric effect is observed only for metals and not for non-metals? Isn't it possible for the photon to release an electron from a non-metal surface?
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Kinetic energy of an electron with de Broglie wavelength $\lambda$

If an electron has de Broglie wavelength $\lambda$, can I write it's kinetic energy $E = \frac{hc}{\lambda}$? If not then what energy does the equation represent and when can the equation be used ?
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Photoelectric Effect Changing The Charge of a Metal?

So the photoelectric effect causes metals to emit electrons in contact with light. I have two questions... 1) Does this keep happening until no more electrons are being emitted? 2) Can't this effect ...
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1answer
167 views

Why doesn't photoelectric current increase with frequency of the incident wave?

If the frequency of the incident wave is increased, then the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons increases. If so, why doesn't the photoelectric current increase? If the kinetic energy of electrons ...
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2answers
57 views

Compton effect in photo-electric?

In photo-electric effect Einstein said that photons incidents on material and gives their energy which will gives kinetic energy to electrons. But i also want to know that why Compton's effect not ...
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1answer
56 views

Is there a relationship between kinetic energy of emitted electron and photoelectric current?

I know that photoelectric current is dependent upon intensity of incident light. But it should also be dependent upon kinetic energy of emitted electron because mathematically $I=Q/T$. So if kinetic ...
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97 views

Why doesn't saturation photocurrent depend on frequency of incident ray, keeping intensity constant?

We know that intensity I = nhf, where n is no. of photons striking metal surface per second per unit sq unit area, and f is frequency of incident ray. In the book it was said that if we change the ...
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If photons have mass then how can they travel at speed of light? [closed]

Anything that has mass must be slower than speed of light. If they are travelling at speed of light they must contain infinite energy which should be able to destroy everything, clearly thats not ...
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330 views

Does a single photon's energy depend on frequency? (photoelectric effect)

Essentially this question boils down to "why does the energy of light depend on frequency?". The analogy my textbook (pg. 272 principles of chemistry A molecular Approach 3rd edition by Nivaldo J. ...
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2answers
114 views

Can one photon emit two electrons?

My question refers to the photoelectric effect. I have heard that it is possible, that for one photon, two electrons leave the irradiated metal. Is this correct and by which process can this be ...