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69
votes
10answers
8k views

How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?

There is this famous example about the order difference between gravitational force and EM force. All the gravitational force of Earth is just countered by the electromagnetic force between the ...
23
votes
3answers
2k views

Does black hole formation contradict the Pauli exclusion principle?

A star's collapse can be halted by the degeneracy pressure of electrons or neutrons due to the Pauli exclusion principle. In extreme relativistic conditions, a star will continue to collapse ...
22
votes
7answers
5k views

Why do neutrons repel each other?

I can understand why 2 protons will repel each other, because they're both positive. But there isn't a neutral charge is there? So why do neutrons repel? (Do they, or have I been misinformed?) The ...
19
votes
10answers
13k views

Does the Pauli exclusion principle instantaneously affect distant electrons?

According to Brian Cox in his A night with the Stars lecture$^1$, the Pauli exclusion principle means that no electron in the universe can have the same energy state as any other electron in the ...
19
votes
2answers
1k views

Can bosons that are composed of several fermions occupy the same state?

It is generally assumed that there is no limit on how many bosons are allowed to occupy the same quantum mechanical state. However, almost every boson encountered in every-day physics is not a ...
15
votes
2answers
3k views

Is Pauli-repulsion a “force” that is completely separate from the 4 fundamental forces?

You can have two electrons that experience each other's force by the exchange of photons (i.e. the electromagnetic force). Yet if you compress them really strongly, the electromagnetic interaction ...
12
votes
3answers
648 views

How does the Pauli exclusion principle create a force in degenerate matter?

My understanding is that when it comes to forming a white dwarf, it is the electron degeneracy pressure, due to the Pauli Exclusion Principle, preventing collapse in of the white dwarf. If the ...
10
votes
2answers
370 views

Capacity of an orbital to hold muons and electrons

In a normal atom, there is a limit of 2 electrons per obital due to the Pauli-Exclusion principle. I have seen people talking about replacing an electron with a muon, but since muons and electrons are ...
10
votes
2answers
224 views

How strong is electron degeneracy pressure?

I'm trying to get some specific numbers for electron degeneracy that I can understand, using a concrete example. Take for example this portion of carbon crystal: Exactly how much energy would be ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

What causes the Pauli exclusion principle (and why does spin 1/2 = fermion)?

It seems to be related to exchange interaction, but I can't penetrate the Wikipedia article. What has the Pauli exclusion principle to do with indistinguishability?
8
votes
3answers
386 views

How axiomatic is the symmetrization requirement (i.e. the Pauli principle)? (in QM)

I've so far always been told, that the symmetrization requirement is an axiom on the level of the Schrödinger equation and the statistical interpretation of the wave function (or it's absolute value). ...
8
votes
2answers
419 views

Fermions in the same state

I need some clarification of what is meant when someone says "fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state". Consider two bosons: $$\psi(\vec{r_1}, s_1, \vec{r_2}, s_2) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \left( ...
8
votes
1answer
237 views

What causes Paulis Exclusion Principle?

Currently I'm taking an astrophysics class and has now come across electron degeneracy. As far as I understand, the reason why white dwarfs and such, does not collapse, is due to this, meaning that ...
8
votes
1answer
206 views

Why does the conjugated $\pi$ bond not violate the Pauli Exclusion Principle?

Let's look at the molecule 1,3 butadiene: $CH_2=CH-CH=CH_2$ and number the carbon atoms 1 to 4 from left to right. The bonds between 1 and 2 and between 3 and 4 are double bonds: each ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Is Palladium an exception?

I have been taught in school that atoms cannot have more than 8 electrons in the outer shell. Palladium atom's electron configuration is 2,8,18,18. Why isn't it 2,8,18,17,1 like the case of Platinum ...
7
votes
1answer
109 views

Entanglement and the Pauli exclusion priciple

Could you say that two electrons in the ground state of a helium atom experience quantum entanglement? They are both in the same energy level and cannot have the same quantum numbers. If one is spin ...
7
votes
3answers
6k views

What is the cause of the normal force? [duplicate]

I've been wondering, what causes the normal force to exist? In class the teacher never actually explains it, he just says "It has to be there because something has to counter gravity." While I ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Degeneracy Pressure, What is it?

There has been numerous question, some violent even in physics@SE regarding PEP and EM forces. But what baffles me is what is degeneracy pressure? I know there are 4 fundamental forces- EM, gravity, ...
6
votes
1answer
103 views

Nature of the quantum degeneracy pressure

It is commonly known that it is the electron degeneracy pressure that prevents the collapse of a white dwarf into a neutron star, and it is not the electromagnetic force. However, it is also widely ...
6
votes
1answer
89 views

Pauli exclusion principle and relativity

I'm somewhat curious about how the Pauli Exclusion Principle functions when relativistic time becomes a significant factor. Just to clear things up, my (possibly poor) understanding goes like this. ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Electron shells in atoms: What causes them to exist as they do?

I have seen similar posts, but I haven't seen what seems to be a clear and direct answer. Why do only a certain number of electrons occupy each shell? Why are the shells arranged in certain distances ...
5
votes
2answers
908 views

What prevents bosons from occupying the same location?

The Pauli exclusion principle states that no two fermions can share identical quantum states. Bosons, one the other hand, face no such prohibition. This allows multiple bosons to essentially occupy ...
5
votes
2answers
778 views

How is the Pauli Exclusion Principle a consequence of antisymmetric wavefunction?

How is the Pauli Exclusion Principle a consequence of antisymmetric wavefunction?
5
votes
1answer
132 views

Are composite bosons always bosonic (e.g. the pion-cloud surrounding the nuclei)?

The $\pi$-meson is a boson, but consists of quark-antiquark (fermions). It seems to me that at some energy level (equivalently distance) the inner structure (fermionic nature of the quarks) of the ...
5
votes
1answer
271 views

Question on Pauli's Exclusion Principle

Pauli's EP says that electrons in a subshell will have opposing spins. Now, lets say I prepare two electrons with spin up. If I took an alpha particle ($\mathrm{He^{2+}}$) and added one of these ...
5
votes
1answer
70 views

Spin, statistics and neutron stars

So a thought occurred to a friend of mine the other day: in a neutron star, neutrons are prevented from sitting directly on top of one another due to the Pauli exclusion principle, what with neutrons ...
5
votes
2answers
127 views

When does Pauli's exclusion principle kick in?

Imagine that I prepare a fermion in the $\left|\uparrow \right\rangle$ state and a second one far away in the $\left|\downarrow \right\rangle$ state and set them in a path for collision. According to ...
5
votes
3answers
150 views

Question about the exclusion principle

I understand the Pauli exclusion principle like this: For two electrons to occupy the same state their spins must be opposite. If the two electrons are in different states (different spatial ...
4
votes
5answers
6k views

If the earth has gravity, why don't we all collapse to the center?

I'm sorry if the answer is obvious for you guys, but why don't we all (including buildings, road, people, the ground) collapse to the center of the earth because of gravity? Is it because we have ...
4
votes
3answers
740 views

Pauli principle for particles very far apart from each other

Can two electrons be in the same state, when they belong to two different atoms, which are "far enough" (whatever that means) apart from each other? With "same state" I mean that (as far as ...
4
votes
3answers
610 views

I don't understand the relationship between electron indistinguishability and the Pauli exclusion principle

I know I'm wrong but this is my line of thought: If electrons are indistinguishable, then why do we have an exclusion principle? If we have two electrons in an s orbital, the Pauli exclusion principle ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Is the electromagnetic force responsible for contact forces? [duplicate]

It is commonly stated that there are four fundamental forces, or interactions, in nature. It is natural to consider which of those is responsible for the normal force we meet in elementary physics. ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Why there are no uuu and ddd baryons with spin 1/2?

What is preventing $Δ^{++}$ and $Δ^-$ baryons from going to a lower-energy state with spin 1/2 similar to that of protons and neutrons? I don't think the Pauli exclusion principle can prevent it ...
4
votes
3answers
192 views

Is every electron in the Universe in a different quantum state?

Is every electron in the Universe in a different quantum state? Is this what the Pauli Exclusion Principle tells us?
4
votes
2answers
294 views

Number conservation of bosons and fermions

Why is the number of bosons not conserved while the number of fermions is conserved? Does it have something to do with the Pauli exclusion principle?
4
votes
1answer
183 views

Do mass and the Pauli exclusion principle conspire to make light fermions take up more space?

The wavelength of light fermions is longer. Wouldn't this cause them to take up 'more space' so that they didn't overlap according to the Pauli exclusion principle? Am I totally misunderstanding ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Where does the Pauli Repulsive Force come from that counteracts the attraction between atoms and ions? [duplicate]

I'm learning about such things as ionic and covalent bonds, and the reason given for the ionic bonds is electrostatic attraction. However, if that were true, then the two ions would accelerate toward ...
4
votes
1answer
255 views

Revisiting the microscopic concept of Touching with some more questions

This question is regarding the amazing answer given by Terry Bollinger at this Phys.SE post. I think this answer is very helpful but i do have some standing questions. He says Once the bonding ...
4
votes
0answers
42 views

Which is the mechanism through which dying stars shed their outer atmosphere and leave behind their core? [closed]

I was looking into neutron star creation and I read that when a star dies, it expells its outer atmosphere and leaves behind a really small really dense nucleus (a white dwarf if the first star was a ...
4
votes
0answers
62 views

Is it degeneracy pressure rather than electrostatic repulsion that stops us falling through the floor? [duplicate]

From Wikipedia: Degeneracy Pressure Freeman Dyson showed that the imperviousness of solid matter is due to quantum degeneracy pressure rather than electrostatic repulsion as had been previously ...
4
votes
0answers
164 views

Some fundamental results in QFTs [closed]

In quantum theory we have some principles that guides us, e.g. Pauli's principle. What I am after in this question is a list of fundamental results, be it equation or identities that must hold in a ...
3
votes
2answers
209 views

Quantum mechanics and the atom

I was thinking about the nature of the atom, specifically, why electrons do not spiral into the nucleus. My physics book says the principal quantum number $n$ must be an integer number of wave ...
3
votes
4answers
618 views

Experimental evidence of Pauli's exclusion principle

A fermion is described by a set of quantum numbers, this set of numbers lead us to a unique wave function. If two fermions are described by the same wave function (violating the Pauli's exclusion ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Why can't two or more objects exist at the same place at the same time?

Two objects with half spin would consist of the elementary particles (i.e. quarks, fermions etc.) which are waves. Therefore all objects consist of several waves. Waves can exist at the same place at ...
3
votes
1answer
260 views

Why do the anticommutation relations imply Fermi–Dirac statistics (Pauli Exclusion Principle) for the field quanta?

I was reading the following article Fermion FIelds and discovered the following passage not fully explained to me : It is these anticommutation relations that imply Fermi–Dirac statistics for ...
3
votes
3answers
555 views

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle say about a superposition of spin states?

Suppose we have an atom. It is commonly said that because of the PEP, two electrons can't be in the ground state unless they have opposite spins, because no two electrons can have the same ...
3
votes
2answers
79 views

pauli exclusion principle in electron beam

Do electrons in an electron beam (cathode ray) follow pauli exclusion principle ? or in other words, does pauli exclution principle apply for the beam of electron?
3
votes
1answer
104 views

Pauli exclusion principle for the protons in water

The Pauli exclusion principle applies to all fermions, right? And protons are fermions. So if you consider a water molecule, and swap the protons in the two hydrogens, shouldn't the wavefunction of ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Electrons, spins, and degeneracy

In an atom, two electrons can have the same set of $n,\ell,m$ quantum numbers as long as they have opposite spins. My introductory physics and chemistry courses have all introduced this as two ...
3
votes
1answer
168 views

Why must fermions be antisymmetric? [closed]

I have read that fermions cannot exist in the same state simultaneously. I understand why indistinguishable particles with an antisymmetric superposition of states can't exist in the same state ...