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2
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2answers
133 views

What happens when electron degeneracy pressure is being overcome (right before an object turns into a black hole)?

I was wondering about hydrostatic equilibrium (the balance of radially inward and outward forces) in large (i.e. above the Chandrasekhar limit) stars. It is often said that when the gravitational ...
3
votes
2answers
198 views

Pauli's Exclusion Principle

Can someone tell me how Pauli's Exclusion Principle gives stability to matter? I know two electrons cannot occupy the same energy state so that is why we cannot squeeze bulk matter after a limit and ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

Is “microbunching” in a free electron laser limited by the Pauli exclusion principle?

As I understand it, a free electron laser can basically be pictured as a synchrotron light source with an undulator which by the particular setup causes the electrons to self-attune so that they ...
5
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3answers
115 views

Question about the exclusion principle

I understand the Pauli exclusion principle like this: For two electrons to occupy the same state their spins must be opposite. If the two electrons are in different states (different spatial ...
6
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6answers
457 views

Electron shells in atoms: What causes them to exist as they do?

I have seen similar posts, but I haven't seen what seems to be a clear and direct answer. Why do only a certain number of electrons occupy each shell? Why are the shells arranged in certain distances ...
3
votes
1answer
115 views

Why do the anticommutation relations imply Fermi–Dirac statistics (Pauli Exclusion Principle) for the field quanta?

I was reading the following article Fermion FIelds and discovered the following passage not fully explained to me : It is these anticommutation relations that imply Fermi–Dirac statistics for ...
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0answers
54 views

How to show that two spin one half particles must form a anti-symmetric wavefunction?

I am stuck on how to connect the ideas that two spin half particles must form a anti-symmetric wavefunction. Is there a proof on how to show that two spin one half particles must form a anti-symmetric ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

How do I describe two entangled electrons in the same state except for a different spin

I am trying to formulate the wave function that describes two entangled electons having the same position but opposite spin. According to the Pauli exclusion principle this should be possible. And ...
4
votes
1answer
173 views

Revisiting the microscopic concept of Touching with some more questions

This question is regarding the amazing answer given by Terry Bollinger at this Phys.SE post. I think this answer is very helpful but i do have some standing questions. He says Once the bonding ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Is there a connection between exclusion principle and the speed of light?

As far as I know exotic stars are composed of degenerate matter created by the balance between gravity and pressure of exclusion principle and as the mass of the star grows it goes into more ...
10
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2answers
160 views

How strong is electron degeneracy pressure?

I'm trying to get some specific numbers for electron degeneracy that I can understand, using a concrete example. Take for example this portion of carbon crystal: Exactly how much energy would be ...
17
votes
7answers
3k views

Why do neutrons repel each other?

I can understand why 2 protons will repel each other, because they're both positive. But there isn't a neutral charge is there? So why do neutrons repel? (Do they, or have I been misinformed?) The ...
2
votes
1answer
134 views

Why there are no uuu and ddd baryons with spin 1/2?

What is preventing $Δ^{++}$ and $Δ^-$ baryons from going to a lower-energy state with spin 1/2 similar to that of protons and neutrons? I don't think the Pauli exclusion principle can prevent it ...
2
votes
3answers
261 views

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle say about a superposition of spin states?

Suppose we have an atom. It is commonly said that because of the PEP, two electrons can't be in the ground state unless they have opposite spins, because no two electrons can have the same ...
0
votes
1answer
139 views

Electron Decay, Why are there P and higher orbitals?

Related: Decay from excited state to ground state My confusion arose initially from the definition of binding energy being the lowest energy state (n=1) in the hydrogen atom. This, I assume, is ...
2
votes
0answers
51 views

What are the parameters for Pauli's repulsion pseudo-force?

I have found the following formula for the repulsion potential due to the overlap of the electron clouds arising from Pauli's exclusion principle: $$V = A\exp(-r/\phi)$$ where r is the distance ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

How would Hamiltonian for several fermions with spin look?

All discussions of Pauli exclusion principle I read usually talked about antisymmetric wavefunctions, from which the princinple appears. But I would like to see a Hamiltonian for multiple fermions, ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

Quantum mechanics and atomic bonding

I'm learning quantum mechanics in high school this year, and I have several doubts. I've done my research on various websites but my understanding is still fuzzy. I understand that when I punch a wall ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

Aufbau principle in modern quantum theory

What is the rigorous definition of the Aufbau principle and the mathematical model used for its description? From Wikipedia, we have that the principle postulates a hypothetical process in which an ...
6
votes
1answer
743 views

Is Palladium an exception?

I have been taught in school that atoms cannot have more than 8 electrons in the outer shell. Palladium atom's electron configuration is 2,8,18,18. Why isn't it 2,8,18,17,1 like the case of Platinum ...
3
votes
3answers
227 views

Why do nucleons feel a repulsive force when less than 1 fm?

My Modern Physics textbook by Taylor states that when nucleons are less than 1 fm apart, there is a strong repulsive force between them. I am fairly certain that it is not the Pauli Exclusion ...
3
votes
0answers
65 views

Can Pauli exclusion be described locally?

Is it possible, in principle, to define the exclusion principle in a "local" sense, as a property of the tangent space at a point, or a single fiber of a spin bundle? Or does it necessitate a global ...
2
votes
1answer
163 views

Why do electrons couple in atoms?

In describing electron states in hydrogen, we have a very "simple" picture, at least in intro-quantum. But this only has one electron! As we permit more electrons, we also have things like the ...
3
votes
2answers
287 views

Electrons, spins, and degeneracy

In an atom, two electrons can have the same set of $n,\ell,m$ quantum numbers as long as they have opposite spins. My introductory physics and chemistry courses have all introduced this as two ...
15
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2answers
495 views

Does black hole formation contradict the Pauli exclusion principle?

A star's collapse can be halted by the degeneracy pressure of electrons or neutrons due to the Pauli exclusion principle. In extreme relativistic conditions, a star will continue to collapse ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Is there is a reason for Pauli's Exclusion Principle?

As a starting quantum physicist I am very interested in reasons why does Pauli's Exclusion Principle works. I mean standard explanations are not quite satisfying. Of course we can say that is because ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Why can't two or more objects exist at the same place at the same time?

Two objects with half spin would consist of the elementary particles (i.e. quarks, fermions etc.) which are waves. Therefore all objects consist of several waves. Waves can exist at the same place at ...
8
votes
2answers
209 views

How axiomatic is the symmetrization requirement (i.e. the Pauli principle)? (in QM)

I've so far always been told, that the symmetrization requirement is an axiom on the level of the Schrödinger equation and the statistical interpretation of the wave function (or it's absolute value). ...
5
votes
1answer
113 views

Are composite bosons always bosonic (e.g. the pion-cloud surrounding the nuclei)?

The $\pi$-meson is a boson, but consists of quark-antiquark (fermions). It seems to me that at some energy level (equivalently distance) the inner structure (fermionic nature of the quarks) of the ...
4
votes
0answers
158 views

Some fundamental results in QFTs [closed]

In quantum theory we have some principles that guides us, e.g. Pauli's principle. What I am after in this question is a list of fundamental results, be it equation or identities that must hold in a ...
1
vote
4answers
412 views

Experimental evidence of Pauli's exclusion principle

A fermion is described by a set of quantum numbers, this set of numbers lead us to a unique wave function. If two fermions are described by the same wave function (violating the Pauli's exclusion ...
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2answers
1k views

Is Pauli-repulsion a “force” that is completely separate from the 4 fundamental forces?

You can have two electrons that experience each other's force by the exchange of photons (i.e. the electromagnetic force). Yet if you compress them really strongly, the electromagnetic interaction ...
7
votes
2answers
243 views

Fermions in the same state

I need some clarification of what is meant when someone says "fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state". Consider two bosons: $$\psi(\vec{r_1}, s_1, \vec{r_2}, s_2) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \left( ...
1
vote
1answer
250 views

Physical implications behind the exchange antisymmetry condition of fermions

Explain the Physical implications behind the exchange antisymmetry condition of fermions. This condition forms the basis of the pauli principle but I can't find/understand what happens physically that ...
18
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10answers
10k views

Does the Pauli exclusion principle instantaneously affect distant electrons?

According to Brian Cox in his A night with the Stars lecture$^1$, the Pauli exclusion principle means that no electron in the universe can have the same energy state as any other electron in the ...
2
votes
1answer
693 views

Is the electromagnetic force responsible for contact forces? [duplicate]

It is commonly stated that there are four fundamental forces, or interactions, in nature. It is natural to consider which of those is responsible for the normal force we meet in elementary physics. ...
4
votes
2answers
770 views

Where does the Pauli Repulsive Force come from that counteracts the attraction between atoms and ions? [duplicate]

I'm learning about such things as ionic and covalent bonds, and the reason given for the ionic bonds is electrostatic attraction. However, if that were true, then the two ions would accelerate toward ...
3
votes
3answers
392 views

Pauli principle for particles very far apart from each other

Can two electrons be in the same state, when they belong to two different atoms, which are "far enough" (whatever that means) apart from each other? With "same state" I mean that (as far as ...
2
votes
1answer
180 views

Explanation of Superconductivity

I can't get a definitive explanation of why superconductivity happens and I am getting mixed explanations from my textbooks. I will tell you what I know and hopefully you can correct any ...
2
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0answers
47 views

wavefunction antisymmetry as a limit of a deeper geometric constraint

Recently there was an interesting reformulation of Pauli principle in terms of polytopes: http://physics.aps.org/articles/v6/8 My question is, can this suggest that fermionicity is not a fundamental ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the cause of the normal force? [duplicate]

I've been wondering, what causes the normal force to exist? In class the teacher never actually explains it, he just says "It has to be there because something has to counter gravity." While I ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Falling through the ground [duplicate]

I do not know much about physics but I know that according to Newtons third law of motion when we walk we are pushing the ground down but the ground is pushing us up. What force is making the ground ...
3
votes
1answer
210 views

Possible states for two electrons in the helium atom

Consider the helium atom with two electrons, but ignore coupling of angular momenta, relativistic effects, etc. The spin state of the system is a combination of the triplet states and the singlet ...
1
vote
1answer
145 views

Quantum computing and Pauli exclusion principle?

Ok so I saw this video by Brian Cox where he explains how no 2 particles can have same energy level. Later I watched video "Was Brian Cox wrong?". Where they explained that he (probably on purpose) ...
5
votes
2answers
529 views

What prevents bosons from occupying the same location?

The Pauli exclusion principle states that no two fermions can share identical quantum states. Bosons, one the other hand, face no such prohibition. This allows multiple bosons to essentially occupy ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Is there anything to prevent paired-up neutrons from a complete overlap

The reason "neutrons don't overlap", as DarenW explained it, has to do with intricate forces at play that take into account the spins, iso-spins and symmetry of the wavefunctions. However, assume I ...
0
votes
4answers
258 views

Why are electrons consider waves?

I know the wave nature of electrons was evoked to explain why atoms are stable but I thought waves could be put in the same state like photons yet electrons can not exist in the same state.
3
votes
3answers
308 views

I don't understand the relationship between electron indistinguishability and the Pauli exclusion principle

I know I'm wrong but this is my line of thought: If electrons are indistinguishable, then why do we have an exclusion principle? If we have two electrons in an s orbital, the Pauli exclusion principle ...
2
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1answer
228 views

Spin and Parity of $^{17}_8 O$ excited states

$^{17}_8 O$ quoted here has a spin of 5/2 and parity of +1 for the ground state, I agree with this, the unpaired neutron is in the $1d_{1/2}$ state so l = 2, spin = 5/2. Now I want to figure out the ...
58
votes
10answers
5k views

How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?

There is this famous example about the order difference between gravitational force and EM force. All the gravitational force of Earth is just countered by the electromagnetic force between the ...