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5
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6answers
614 views

What needs to happen for one to ingest radioactive particles and how likely is this?

There are many stories about radioactivity and the relative danger of it in the news lately, but very little actual information. The radioactivity levels around Fukushima Daiichi are high, but seem ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

Preons and 't Hooft condition

If some fundamental particles, like leptons or quarks are composite (e.g.in preonic models), or the same with gauge bosons or the higgs particles. How could it be possible that preons were more ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Writing wave functions with spin of a system of particles

Suppose I have 2 fermions in a potential $V(x)$. Both particles are moving in one dimension: the $x$ axis. Then, neglecting the interaction between the particles, the spatial wave function of the ...
0
votes
1answer
170 views

Can we see light as it 'interferes' with itself and produces the characteristic double-slit pattern?

This TED talk suggests that we can now watch as a beam of light propagates through a bottle filled with water. My question is: can we use this new technology to perhaps 'see' the photon as it makes ...
3
votes
1answer
109 views

What is the $t\bar{t}$ production supposed to bring up

The $t\bar{t}$ production, I've read, that will somehow confirm the QCD and might bring up new physics. Why are we studying $t\bar{t}$ production from $p-p$ collisions at the LHC? What are we trying ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Confusion between the de Broglie wavelength of a particle and wave packets

So I learned that the de Broglie wavelength of a particle, $\lambda = \frac{h}{p}$, where h is Planck's constant and p is the momentum of the particle. I also learned that a quantum mechanics ...
2
votes
1answer
116 views

Uncertainty Principle on System of particles

I am new to Quantum Mechanics. I read the uncertainty principle - it says there are pairs of physical quantities which can't both be determined with certainty for a particle. My question is does the ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Acceleration by spherical particles (micron-scale) by an external force

I am looking for an expression for the velocity of a micron sized (1 - 10 micron diameter) sized particles under accelerating forces. I have aerosols in mind. This is what I have in mind The ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Do particles and anti-particles attract each other?

Do particles and anti-particles attract each other? From the very basic understanding that they are created out of nothing mutually and collide to annihilate each other seems to indicate this happens ...
3
votes
1answer
116 views

Convolving Parton Distribution Functions

I have the cross-sections as a function of $\sqrt{s}$ for a process with a $u$-quark and $u$-antiquark in the initial state (eg.: $u \bar{u} \to e^- e^+$). I have a standard parton distribution ...
5
votes
2answers
457 views

What if a faster-than-light particle is found?

What will be the consequence (severe ones) on laws of physics if a particle that travels faster than light is discovered? I am looking for a more general answer so that a high school student would be ...
1
vote
0answers
99 views

Do particles travel backward and forward in time? [duplicate]

All these classical ideas are pointless and obsolete today, because in quantum mechanics, the particles are completely different objects, defined by quantum motion of fields, not by the location of ...
0
votes
2answers
235 views

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere?

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere, when in fact it's not?
1
vote
2answers
221 views

Does the unpredictability in the “micro world” means that everything is if we can look at it close enough imperfect?

Does the unpredictability in the "micro world" means that everything is if we can look at it close enough imperfect? I mean, there is a saying "You will never stand in the same river again" or ...
2
votes
2answers
206 views

Why does the amplitude of a ripple tells us that it is a particle?

The quote below is from Matt Strassler's blog: a particle is a ripple with many crests and troughs; its amplitude, relative to its overall length, is what tells you that it is a single ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Frequency of an Electron

My question is very simple. If frequency is defined as the cylces per unit time, Then what is meant by "Frequency of an Electron" ? If the rotation of electron around a nucleus is considered then, ...
0
votes
2answers
144 views

Can energy be defined as the most fundamental particle which exists in different forms as protons, electrons etc

What we see all the different forms of matter around is just a form of energy. Why can't this energy be the most fundamental particle. Given dust can turn into a star and then emit all sorts of ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

Is the idea of dividing the universe into particles anything more than an untrue convenience? [closed]

In theory, we speak of a particle as having properties. In reality, the measurement of any property is just an interaction between the target to be measured, and the measuring apparatus, where the ...
2
votes
2answers
193 views

Is there a map of the particles in outer space?

Since outer space is not quite a vacuum, and the distribution of various heavenly bodies is locally inhomogeneous, it seems reasonable to expect that the density and variety of particles ...
1
vote
1answer
210 views

Lifetimes of stable particles

What are possible lifetimes of up/down quarks, electronic/muonic/tau neutrinos, photon, gluon? I understand they are said to be stable, but, as I saw on wikipedia, the lower bound for the "stable" ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views
1
vote
3answers
345 views

Do particle pairs avoid each other? Please end my musings

Can you explain what happens when a particle and its antiparticle are created. Do they whiz away from each other at the speed of light or what? I suppose that they don't because otherwise they would ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Speed of a particle in quantum mechanics: phase velocity vs. group velocity

Given that one usually defines two different velocities for a wave, these being the phase velocity and the group velocity, I was asking their meaning for the associated particle in quantum mechanics. ...
3
votes
2answers
195 views

How can Sub-Atomic Particles be Visualized?

Can you see or accurately visualise sub atomic particles or are they known only by maths and/or inference?
4
votes
1answer
231 views

Temporal part of Quantum Wavefunction

I was hoping that someone could give me the more fundamental reason that we take as the temporal part of a quantum wavefunction the function $e^{-i\omega t}$ and not $e^{+i\omega t}$? Clearly ...
8
votes
6answers
1k views

What is the meaning of the word “particle” in particle physics?

I want to use Matt Strassler's definition of the word "particle" as a specific example: Matt Strassler writes: (1) "...all the elementary “particles” (i.e. quanta) of nature are quanta of waves ...
0
votes
3answers
223 views

Center Of Mass Troubles

I understand the concept of Center Of Mass(com), but I am having a difficult time interpreting the equation of the simplified case of one-dimension. The book I am reading defines the position of the ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

How can/does calculus describe the movement of a particle?

I was talking to Roger Penrose about calculus in the appendix in his book Cycles Of Time and he said I'd need a good understanding of calculus if I wanted to read his book in great depth. He said I ...
1
vote
1answer
547 views

Definition of elementary particle [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why are atoms particles? According to wikipedia an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle not known to have substructure. Moreover, I've learned ...
2
votes
1answer
174 views

$sss$ decay and violation of strangeness

Why can the hyperon $\Omega^{-}$ not decay by strong interaction? It seems that strangeness must be violated, but why is it the only way?
7
votes
1answer
375 views

Why doesn't my particle simulation end in a flat disc?

I've made a 3d particle simulator where particles are attracted to each other by the inverse of the square radius. The purpose of my experiment is to see if this alone would create a flat disk (like ...
3
votes
2answers
202 views

Understanding a Physics Paper on Quantum Teleportation of Continuous variables

The paper I am trying to understand is here: http://pra.aps.org/abstract/PRA/v49/i2/p1473_1 The paper describes the quantum teleportation protocol in a general case with continuous dynamical ...
0
votes
1answer
165 views

Would synchronized dancing be a good way to describe entangled atoms to a laymen?

I was talking my professor about entanglement swapping between light and matter and it is briefly described here: You start out with a crystal capable of doing parametric down conversion of incoming ...
5
votes
5answers
714 views

The observation of a non-SM resonance at 38 MeV

Was reported here. Of course if this is real it is very exciting. It leads me to the question: given that it took so long to find this resonance at a meager 38 MeV, is it possible that all SUSY ...
1
vote
1answer
446 views

What was the first discovery of the delta baryon $\Delta^{++}$?

The delta baryons (also called delta resonances) are a family of subatomic hadron particles which have the symbols $\Delta^{++}$, $\Delta^{+}$, $\Delta^{0}$, and $\Delta^{−}$ and electric charges +2, ...
4
votes
6answers
991 views

Good book about elementary particles for high school students?

I need a good book about elementary particles. I am a high school student and don't want anything to technical. I read a brief history of time and the universe in a nutshell but i want something that ...
1
vote
2answers
269 views

Why are atoms particles?

The Oxford English Dictionary definition of particle is as follows: "A component of the physical world smaller than the atom." I read an article in NewScientist and it said "...all particles from ...
2
votes
0answers
843 views

Why is it that protons and electrons have exactly the same but opposite charge? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do electron and proton have the same but opposite electric charge? Doesn't it seem very curious that one is an elementary particle and the other a subatomic particle ...
3
votes
3answers
597 views

Existence of creation and annihilation operators

In a multiple particle Hilbert space (any space of any multi-particle system), is it sufficient to define creation and annihilation operators by their action (e.g. mapping an n-particle state to an ...
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Is Joule heating only between charged particles?

The Wikipedia page for Joule heating explains "It is now known that Joule heating is caused by interactions between the moving particles that form the current (usually, but not always, electrons) and ...
2
votes
5answers
196 views

Photoelectric effect without light rays

For electromagnetic waves we have the photon association, one imagines light as particles "flying around". What is the analogy for a constant electrical field, one which doesn't change in time ...
2
votes
2answers
259 views

Very basic question on spin

Can anyone give a simple explanation for what the fractions and integers mean in particle physics when describing spin? I've seen on another forum (the naked scientist) that it should not be thought ...
2
votes
2answers
333 views

Some very basic questions on the Higgs Boson

What exactly is a boson? Is the Higgs boson the cause of gravity or a result of it? Does the collision of particles at the LHC create a gravity field or waves or somehow interact with the gravity ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

What entities create a gravitational field?

It is well known that masses create a gravitational field. Photons are affected by gravitation, but do they generate a gravitational field as well? What about the other gauge bosons? Do gravitons ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

The Large Hadron Collider produce material residues?

In the LHC particles are accelerated until they collide, producing energy and this make new particles. My question is what happened after this. What happened to new particles and to old particles ...
18
votes
3answers
2k views

Are elementary particles actually more elementary than quasiparticles?

Quarks and leptons are considered elementary particles, while phonons, holes, and solitons are quasiparticles. In light of emergent phenomena, such as fractionally charged particles in fractional ...
4
votes
2answers
307 views

Higgs boson and quasiparticles

Do we know exactly the difference between particles and quasiparticles? Is Higgs boson a particle or a quasiparticle? I ask this because if I understood well, Higgs boson created by a spontaneaous ...
1
vote
2answers
324 views

How can particles being closed strings in String Theory create solidity in objects?

I understand how particles with certain masses can form to make atoms, which create solidity in objects due to Pauli's Exclusion Principle and what have you. These particles actually have mass and to ...
2
votes
1answer
258 views

A question regarding particle trajectories in the symplectic manifold formalism

How to solve a free particle on a 2-sphere using symplectic manifold formalism of classical mechanics ? Is there a way to get coriolis effect directly, without going into Newton mechanics? And is ...
3
votes
0answers
225 views

what interactions would take place between a free proton and a dipolariton?

What interactions can be expected to take place between a free proton and a dipolariton, (a) at high energies and (b) at lower energies? A dipolariton is a bosonic quasi-particle mentioned in a ...