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3
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3answers
152 views

Will the current carrying solid conductors emit light?

If we pass current through a gas, like in the discharge tube, the electrons will accelerate in the electric field. The accelerated electrons will collide with gas molecules, and transfer some of their ...
12
votes
2answers
352 views

Why are there no particles in conformal theories?

In Matt Strassler's recent post (here) he makes the statement that scale invariant (I assume he means conformally invariant, more generally) theories have no particles in them. What's the reason for ...
-4
votes
2answers
376 views

What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?

Look at this here. With respect to the sciences, the atom is obviously not the smallest piece of mass. Apparently, if people have already broken down the atom in to particles smaller than so, why ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

How do I build an alpha emitter?

I would like to build an alpha emitter. I suppose I had some vague idea of knocking the electrons off of some helium. But upon further examination the idea does strike me as...naive? My question is ...
0
votes
0answers
113 views

What the quantum spin refers to? How we calculate the angular momentum $\omega$ from the spin quantum number?

How we calculate the angular momentum $\omega$ from the spin quantum number, to know how fast a particle rotating on its own axis?
2
votes
1answer
168 views

Classical models with unbounded particle number

Is there any classical model which deals with the birth, life and death of particles? What application could it have? I am talking about a 'billiard-ball' kind of model, but the kind in which balls ...
1
vote
2answers
287 views

Particles and their charges [duplicate]

It is always known that electrons and protons have opposite charges but what gives electrons or protons the charges they have?
0
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0answers
548 views

Statics: particle mechanics versus rigid body mechanics

In particle mechanics where the notion of rotation does not apply, particles are said to be in static equilibrium when the sum of the external forces acting on the particle of interest in all ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Storing kinetic energy in bonds

Let's assume a setup with a static linear molecule with three identical atoms connected by bonds and a single atom, identical to the other three, being shot at the molecule. Let's also assume that ...
-2
votes
1answer
179 views

Does the particle vibrate in 3D space? [closed]

As far as I know, particles vibrate with a frequency and wavelength determined by their energy level. Is this vibration in 3D space?
0
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0answers
60 views

Preons and 't Hooft condition

If some fundamental particles, like leptons or quarks are composite (e.g.in preonic models), or the same with gauge bosons or the higgs particles. How could it be possible that preons were more ...
5
votes
2answers
260 views

Is ch. 2, sect. 4 of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol. 1 still accurate?

The chapter 2 section 4 of volume 1 is on nuclei and particles. Here are a few things that trouble me. Dr. Feynman says that Another most interesting change in the ideas and philosophy of science ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

Can we see light as it 'interferes' with itself and produces the characteristic double-slit pattern?

This TED talk suggests that we can now watch as a beam of light propagates through a bottle filled with water. My question is: can we use this new technology to perhaps 'see' the photon as it makes ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Writing wave functions with spin of a system of particles

Suppose I have 2 fermions in a potential $V(x)$. Both particles are moving in one dimension: the $x$ axis. Then, neglecting the interaction between the particles, the spatial wave function of the ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Magnetic force doesn't do work and therefore can't change the KE of a particle?

I am having a real hard time understanding the principles behind a question I've come across during test prep. Here is the question: Q: A proton and an electron are traveling in the uniform ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

What is the $t\bar{t}$ production supposed to bring up

The $t\bar{t}$ production, I've read, that will somehow confirm the QCD and might bring up new physics. Why are we studying $t\bar{t}$ production from $p-p$ collisions at the LHC? What are we trying ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Uncertainty Principle on System of particles

I am new to Quantum Mechanics. I read the uncertainty principle - it says there are pairs of physical quantities which can't both be determined with certainty for a particle. My question is does the ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Acceleration by spherical particles (micron-scale) by an external force

I am looking for an expression for the velocity of a micron sized (1 - 10 micron diameter) sized particles under accelerating forces. I have aerosols in mind. This is what I have in mind The ...
3
votes
1answer
100 views

Convolving Parton Distribution Functions

I have the cross-sections as a function of $\sqrt{s}$ for a process with a $u$-quark and $u$-antiquark in the initial state (eg.: $u \bar{u} \to e^- e^+$). I have a standard parton distribution ...
5
votes
2answers
394 views

What if a faster-than-light particle is found?

What will be the consequence (severe ones) on laws of physics if a particle that travels faster than light is discovered? I am looking for a more general answer so that a high school student would be ...
1
vote
0answers
97 views

Do particles travel backward and forward in time? [duplicate]

All these classical ideas are pointless and obsolete today, because in quantum mechanics, the particles are completely different objects, defined by quantum motion of fields, not by the location of ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Estimate the difference between two sets of atoms

I've been working on amorphous structures derived from a crystalline one (using MD) containing $N$ atoms. I want to prove that these structures are different and to quantify their "differentness". One ...
0
votes
2answers
205 views

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere?

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere, when in fact it's not?
1
vote
2answers
191 views

Does the unpredictability in the “micro world” means that everything is if we can look at it close enough imperfect?

Does the unpredictability in the "micro world" means that everything is if we can look at it close enough imperfect? I mean, there is a saying "You will never stand in the same river again" or ...
0
votes
2answers
133 views

Can energy be defined as the most fundamental particle which exists in different forms as protons, electrons etc

What we see all the different forms of matter around is just a form of energy. Why can't this energy be the most fundamental particle. Given dust can turn into a star and then emit all sorts of ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Frequency of an Electron

My question is very simple. If frequency is defined as the cylces per unit time, Then what is meant by "Frequency of an Electron" ? If the rotation of electron around a nucleus is considered then, ...
2
votes
2answers
184 views

Is there a map of the particles in outer space?

Since outer space is not quite a vacuum, and the distribution of various heavenly bodies is locally inhomogeneous, it seems reasonable to expect that the density and variety of particles ...
2
votes
2answers
198 views

Why does the amplitude of a ripple tells us that it is a particle?

The quote below is from Matt Strassler's blog: a particle is a ripple with many crests and troughs; its amplitude, relative to its overall length, is what tells you that it is a single ...
1
vote
1answer
176 views

Lifetimes of stable particles

What are possible lifetimes of up/down quarks, electronic/muonic/tau neutrinos, photon, gluon? I understand they are said to be stable, but, as I saw on wikipedia, the lower bound for the "stable" ...
0
votes
1answer
151 views

Is the idea of dividing the universe into particles anything more than an untrue convenience? [closed]

In theory, we speak of a particle as having properties. In reality, the measurement of any property is just an interaction between the target to be measured, and the measuring apparatus, where the ...
1
vote
3answers
293 views

Do particle pairs avoid each other? Please end my musings

Can you explain what happens when a particle and its antiparticle are created. Do they whiz away from each other at the speed of light or what? I suppose that they don't because otherwise they would ...
2
votes
1answer
148 views

Can you tell if a particle is in superposition?

This may be an easy answer for anybody. Is it possible to detect if a particle A is still in a superposition via the sending a group of particles B through a box containing particle A?
3
votes
2answers
166 views

How can Sub-Atomic Particles be Visualized?

Can you see or accurately visualise sub atomic particles or are they known only by maths and/or inference?
4
votes
1answer
194 views

Temporal part of Quantum Wavefunction

I was hoping that someone could give me the more fundamental reason that we take as the temporal part of a quantum wavefunction the function $e^{-i\omega t}$ and not $e^{+i\omega t}$? Clearly ...
2
votes
3answers
11k views

How to deduce E=(3/2)kT?

It says in my course notes that a particle has so-called "kinetic energy" $E=\frac{3}{2}kT=\frac{1}{2}mv^²$ Where does this formula come from? What is k?
8
votes
6answers
904 views

What is the meaning of the word “particle” in particle physics?

I want to use Matt Strassler's definition of the word "particle" as a specific example: Matt Strassler writes: (1) "...all the elementary “particles” (i.e. quanta) of nature are quanta of waves ...
0
votes
3answers
197 views

Center Of Mass Troubles

I understand the concept of Center Of Mass(com), but I am having a difficult time interpreting the equation of the simplified case of one-dimension. The book I am reading defines the position of the ...
3
votes
2answers
413 views

Particles vs Waves

As I remember long ago, in my physics classes, I always had a great trouble understanding the concept of waves. Our professor used to explain, as if everything in this world is made up of waves. ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

$sss$ decay and violation of strangeness

Why can the hyperon $\Omega^{-}$ not decay by strong interaction? It seems that strangeness must be violated, but why is it the only way?
6
votes
1answer
291 views

Why doesn't my particle simulation end in a flat disc?

I've made a 3d particle simulator where particles are attracted to each other by the inverse of the square radius. The purpose of my experiment is to see if this alone would create a flat disk (like ...
3
votes
2answers
184 views

Understanding a Physics Paper on Quantum Teleportation of Continuous variables

The paper I am trying to understand is here: http://pra.aps.org/abstract/PRA/v49/i2/p1473_1 The paper describes the quantum teleportation protocol in a general case with continuous dynamical ...
0
votes
1answer
155 views

Would synchronized dancing be a good way to describe entangled atoms to a laymen?

I was talking my professor about entanglement swapping between light and matter and it is briefly described here: You start out with a crystal capable of doing parametric down conversion of incoming ...
1
vote
1answer
490 views

Definition of elementary particle [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why are atoms particles? According to wikipedia an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle not known to have substructure. Moreover, I've learned ...
1
vote
1answer
384 views

What was the first discovery of the delta baryon $\Delta^{++}$?

The delta baryons (also called delta resonances) are a family of subatomic hadron particles which have the symbols $\Delta^{++}$, $\Delta^{+}$, $\Delta^{0}$, and $\Delta^{−}$ and electric charges +2, ...
1
vote
2answers
222 views

Why are atoms particles?

The Oxford English Dictionary definition of particle is as follows: "A component of the physical world smaller than the atom." I read an article in NewScientist and it said "...all particles from ...
5
votes
5answers
704 views

The observation of a non-SM resonance at 38 MeV

Was reported here. Of course if this is real it is very exciting. It leads me to the question: given that it took so long to find this resonance at a meager 38 MeV, is it possible that all SUSY ...
2
votes
0answers
837 views

Why is it that protons and electrons have exactly the same but opposite charge? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do electron and proton have the same but opposite electric charge? Doesn't it seem very curious that one is an elementary particle and the other a subatomic particle ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Mechanism of Pair Production and Annihilation of Matter

Pair production is where an energetic photon on its interaction with strong electric field surrounding a nucleus produces electron-positron pair. Annihilation of matter is its converse where an ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Is Joule heating only between charged particles?

The Wikipedia page for Joule heating explains "It is now known that Joule heating is caused by interactions between the moving particles that form the current (usually, but not always, electrons) and ...
2
votes
5answers
187 views

Photoelectric effect without light rays

For electromagnetic waves we have the photon association, one imagines light as particles "flying around". What is the analogy for a constant electrical field, one which doesn't change in time ...