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22 views

Books on collision probability and collision processes

Are there any books specifically on collision processes between atoms and molecules and collision probability? I would like to get an overview of the factors that determine collision probability ...
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1answer
174 views

As the universe expands, the wavelengths of photons are stretched, and energy is lost. What about electrons?

Will electrons, and other particles, also loose energy as they travel through the cosmos? They have wavelengths. Do they get "stretched"? My guess is that the EM force, somehow, counteracts this ...
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2answers
93 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
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2answers
370 views

How many subatomic particles can absorb/emit photons?

Is the electron the only subatomic particle that can absorb and emit a photon?
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3answers
81 views

Potential energy & entropy of three particles

Let me first say that I am not a physicist, but I am trying to make a simulation on my computer and I have the following question. Let's consider that we have three free charges that somehow can ...
5
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1answer
148 views

Why is fundamental physics taught in terms of particles?

According to this paper, there can be no relativistic quantum theory of localizeable particles ("relativity plus quantum mechanics exclusively requires a field ontology"). Sean Caroll has also argued ...
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3answers
433 views

When does a particle go through the Higgs Field?

This is a short and simple question... I have been reading my book on particle physics and quantum physics when I had thought of a question that it failed to answer: "Does a particle enter/interact ...
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2answers
53 views

Is any one compact dimension for one particle the same as for another particle?

In the 3+1 dimensions of everyday life and GR particles can share the same extended dimensions. Probably all particles share the same 3+1 dimensions. In string theory compact dimensions seem to be ...
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4answers
2k views

Which is more fundamental, Fields or Particles?

I hope that I am using appropriate terminology. My confusion about quantum theory (beyond my obvious unfamiliarity with its terminology) is basically twofold: I lack an adequate understanding of ...
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0answers
50 views

Formation of atoms [closed]

If a Proton goes toward an Electron with a trajectory that forms a circular motion, these particles will form an atom ?
2
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0answers
50 views

Particle Collision with Static System

I have a system of particles with equal distance with each other and another at random positions which is moving with time. What I want to know is : The method by which I can reduce the number of ...
5
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1answer
89 views

Do radio waves travel around the Earth or through it?

Whenever you hear someone illustrating/describing the transmission of radio waves they always make it seem like they'd travel perfectly around the Earth to another distant location. For example, a ...
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1answer
54 views

If non-zero cosmological constant interpreted as a repulsive field, what would be the properties of this field's quanta?

If non-zero cosmological constant interpreted as a repulsive field, what would be the properties of the excitation of such field, i.e. the particle which serves as the field's quantum? What would be ...
2
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1answer
97 views

Which is the lightest thing in this universe? Is that a photon or neutrino?

I hear a lot of people saying that neutrino is the lightest subatomic particle but according to me a photon must be the lightest as nothing can travel faster than light because it gets heavier and ...
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5answers
2k views

Is the graviton hypothetical?

Wikipedia lists the graviton as a hypothetical particle. I wonder whether graviton is indeed hypothetical or does its existence directly follow from modern physics? Does observation of gravitational ...
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3answers
190 views

If particles are excitations what are their fields?

After reading these : http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/july-2013/real-talk-everything-is-made-of-fields http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=682522 It was clear to me that all ...
1
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0answers
45 views

Space between particles [duplicate]

I am a high school student, and I am just wondering what is the space between each particle, like what is the gap around each atom? I have found no text book cover this topic. Is it a vacuum?
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1answer
73 views

Gillespie's stochastic framework valid for particles in aqueous solution?

Gillespie proposed a stochastic framework for simulating chemical reactions which is predicated on non-reactive elastic collisions serving to 'uniformize' particle position so that the assumption of ...
6
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4answers
191 views

Do particle velocities in liquid follow the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution?

The Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution arises from non-reactive elastic collisions of particles and is usually discussed in the context of the kinetic theory (for gases). There are various ...
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2answers
41 views

Has energy in 'transit' been incorporated into missing matter calcs.?

Has energy in 'transit' been incorporated into missing matter calcs. ?It would seem that, although very small in mass, the sheer number of particles shhoting about from one end of the universe to the ...
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1answer
39 views

Energy in nuclear decays

After a nuclear decay is it a necessity that the total energy of the products is more than the energy of the original particle before decaying? (NB: by 'energy' I don't intend to include mass-energy ...
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2answers
77 views

NO Uncertainties for particles in their own frames!

Well I had this thought experiment in which a particle observes itself, and something like the following is observed. Taking in mind the uncertainty principle all particles even stopped at 0K jiggle ...
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0answers
31 views

How to find Lepton Number? [closed]

is a Standard Model particle with (u, d, b) quark content. What are the electric charge, baryon number and lepton number of this particle? Is this the only particle expected to exist with this quark ...
4
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2answers
283 views

“Periodic Table” of Particles of the Standard Model?

What is a good, single, "periodic table" of all the particles of the Standard Model? I thought Particle Data Group would have a single-page PDF of this, but I couldn't find a single table listing all ...
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3answers
201 views

What is a particle?

I posted this elsewhere also and just found this place so copied it down but yeah. I've always wondered this cause I like wondering bout things but I wanna know and it's simple so I should. I got an ...
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1answer
102 views

How much smaller will be human body, when we hypothetically get of every space between particles [closed]

I had an interesting dream, where advanced civilization compress their body with technology, that turn off space betweens atoms/particles. They travel in small spaceship with billions citizens very ...
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2answers
68 views

The speed of light, objects moving against each other and the effects of a clash

Physics is a hobby interest of mine, so I may be asking a senseless question, but there is something I cannot get my head around when it comes to relative frames, the constant speed of light (as a ...
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2answers
84 views

Do mechanical waves travel in straight lines?

Electromagnetic waves travel in straight lines but do all waves travel in straight lines?
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4answers
2k views

Can one obtain free energy from the vacuum?

It is known that from the vacuum of a quantum field theory, virtual particle pairs are created and destroyed; is it possible to capture these particles thus obtaining free energy from the vacuum?
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1answer
102 views

What kind of a particle has this mass?

I have a particle that has a mass around $(760\pm10)~MeV/c^2$ but I do not know what kind of particle it is. This links me to some tables that have data on all sorts of subatomic particles but it is ...
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1answer
220 views

Why do we assume that Dirac spinor $\Psi$ describe the particle, not the field?

It is a well-known fact that Klein-Gordon scalar $\Psi(x)$, $$ (\partial^{2} + m^2) \Psi (x) = 0 $$ as well as 4-vector $A_{\mu}(x)$, $$ (\partial^{2} + m^{2})A_{\mu} = 0,\quad ...
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2answers
2k views

Which is the smallest known particle that scientists have actually *seen with their eyes*? [closed]

Which is the smallest particle that has been actually seen by the scientists? When I say "actually seen", (may be using some ultra advanced microscope or any other man made eye, using any wavelength ...
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2answers
190 views

How do collisions of fundamental particles produce different fundamental particles?

When considering fundamental particles as waves in fields, it seems like any collision of two particles of some fundamental type could only create energy within that type's field. Why do we expect ...
1
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2answers
100 views

How does particles gain electrical charges and repel each others? (electrostatic stabilization)

When I study electrostatic stabilization, I understand that the particles have same charge and thus repel others, this is how colloid is stabilize. But how does particles gain electrical charges and ...
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1answer
48 views

Why does Se-82 undergo double beta decay?

Looking at the decay chain, I saw it undergoes double beta decay. How is it feasible for something to undergo a simultaneous double decay?
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2answers
149 views

What is the difference between a charged rho meson and a charged pion?

They both seem to have the same quark content: $$\rho^{+} = u\bar{d} = \pi^{+}$$ and $$\rho^{-} = \bar{u}d = \pi^{-}$$ What is different about the two?
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2answers
100 views

Do particles rotate around themselves or they just move while the object rotates?

In this question, I'm not talking about particle spin. I guess, when an object rotates, its atoms also rotate. When an atom rotates, its particles must move in space. I wonder that if the particles ...
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0answers
40 views

Alternative ways to take particle tracks photographs in a cloud chamber

I know that the most common type of particle tracks photography is in photographic plates, but i'm using a cloud chamber and I would like to know if there are alternative ways to take photographs of ...
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3answers
171 views

Does the Universe have finite number of particles? [duplicate]

I read that the number of atoms in the entire observable universe is estimated to be within the range of $10^{78}$ to $10^{82}$. Does the Universe have finite number of particles? If so, how could it ...
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2answers
272 views

If electrons behave as standing waves when they are bound to an atom then how do they carry charge?

Today in my physics lesson we learnt that the best way of describing the behaviour of an electron that is bound to an atom is to treat it as a standing wave. I understand that this is the ...
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0answers
36 views

Twisted supermultiplets

What is a twisted supermultiplet, in a generic supersymmetric theory? Which ordinary fields belong to one of such twisted supermultiplets? I am confident with the idea of a supermultiplet or a ...
1
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1answer
49 views

What is the “inner” force behind attracion/repulsion?

First of all, I'm sorry for any grammatical big error - English is not my native language. I have a question that maybe does not have an answer beyond those which we already have, but maybe there is ...
1
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1answer
84 views

What is the state of the art in particle detection and localization

I am researching methods to detect the position of radioactive materials (emitting gamma and beta particles), and would like to know what current methods are used to do this. What type of sensors are ...
1
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2answers
188 views

From where does a particle get the energy to tunnel?

When a particle is made to confine more and more to a particular position it breaks the energy barrier to get out because of the uncertainty principle. But, from where does the particle get the energy ...
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2answers
171 views

Classical point particles to classical fields

I often hear that in the continuum limit we can study large numbers of particles as fields. I always imagined that by removing all bounds on the number of particles (while keeping total energy, ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Experiment dropping electrons into glass of protons

So, when you drop dye into a glass of water the dye spreads out. Now I realize you cant simply replace the water in the glass with protons (or a pure concoction of electrons) but I am wondering... ...
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1answer
160 views

How is a Higgs boson created?

I have read a lot on Higgs bosons, yet I do not fully comprehend how they are created and how they are "flicked off" the Higgs field. I have also had trouble comprehending why a Higgs boson quickly ...
2
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2answers
108 views

What distinguishes the particles we chose as matter from their antimatter equivalent? [duplicate]

Back before we knew about antimatter we just called everything matter. Ignoring CP-violation for a moment, there is nothing special about matter versus antimatter. Once we knew about antimatter it ...
6
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2answers
100 views

Deciding what to collide at particle accelerator

Different particle accelerators use different types of collisions. For instance at the LHC they investigated p Pb collisions while its predecessor (LEP), used to collide electrons with proton and at ...
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2answers
154 views

What information is lost in the symmetrization necessary to derive the BBGKY hierarchy?

The book on Kinetic theory I'm reading derives the BBGKY hierarchy after introducing the reduced distribution functions $f_s(q^1,p_1,q^2,p_2,\dots,q^s,p_s):=\int\ \rho\ \ \mathrm d q^{s+1} \mathrm d ...