Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
0answers
8 views

What determines the energy ratio of beta decay products?

What determines for any particular decay how much energy the electron and neutrino get? Is it just that in the CM frame of the W- the electron and neutrino are back to back, but then back in the lab ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Maximum electron momentum in $\beta^-$-decay

This should be easy, but I think I have a mind-block... For $\beta^-$-decay, what is the maximum possible momentum for the electron? The two equations I can use are conservation of energy and ...
3
votes
0answers
11 views

Cronin enhancement in p-A collisions

What is the physical picture behind Cronin enhancement in proton-nucleus collisions at intermediate transverse momentum?
2
votes
1answer
108 views

Group Theoretic definition of a particle

We intuitively have a sense of what a particle means in the conventional sense. But is it possible to have a group theoretical definition of a particle, I mean in terms of irreducible representations ...
9
votes
3answers
220 views

Why is fundamental physics taught in terms of particles?

According to this paper, there can be no relativistic quantum theory of localizeable particles ("relativity plus quantum mechanics exclusively requires a field ontology"). Sean Caroll has also argued ...
3
votes
3answers
358 views

Second baryon octet

Let's temporarily ignore spin. If 3 denotes the standard representation of SU(3), 1 the trivial rep, 8 the adjoint rep and 10 the symmetric cube then it's well-known that 3 x 3 x 3 = 1 + 8 + 8 + 10 ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Deriving Feynman rules from a Lagrangian for vertex factors for “more complicated” interactions

I am trying to derive Feynman rules from a given Lagrangian and I got stuck on some vertex factors. What for example is the vertex factor that corresponds to the four-scalar interaction that is ...
2
votes
0answers
50 views
+50

Computing box diagrams with non-vanishing external momenta

I'm trying to explicitly compute the following box diagram in the Feynman-t'Hooft gauge: If I neglect the impulsion of the $s$ quark, then the final amplitude is given by $$\mathcal{A} \propto ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

Fierz identity for Weyl spinors in tensor currents

Using Fierz identity I found that certain four-fermion operator with left $l_i$ and right-chiral $r_i$ Weyl spinors vanish $\bar{l}_1\sigma_{\mu\nu} r_2 \bar{r}_3 \sigma^{\mu\nu} l_4 =$ $ ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Do all atoms get accelerated in a synchrotron? [on hold]

How does an electron accelerator work? I have been going on the accelerators and I have lots of doubts on how to minimise the cost and size of the accelerators.
39
votes
4answers
5k views

What is spin as it relates to subatomic particles?

I often hear about subatomic particles having a property called "spin" but also that it doesn't actually relate to spinning about an axis like you would think. Which particles have spin? What does ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Penning Trap Simulation

I'm currently working on a particle tracker and I would like to implement a Penning trap. I think I might have a problem with the field of the electrical quadrupole. My idea was to place 2 dipoles and ...
2
votes
3answers
56 views

What happens to photons after they hit objects?

If I am not wrong when light hits for example white wall most of the photons are absorbed and transformed into heat and few of the photons at certain wavelength are reflected from the object. So white ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What's the symbol for the antiparticle of the delta plus baryon?

It can't be $\Delta^-$ since that is another particle also made up of quarks (not antiquarks). I can think of four possibilities: $\overline\Delta^+$ $\overline{\Delta^+}$ $\overline\Delta^-$ ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Simultanously HOT and DENSE in QCD?

Take this form of the QCD Phase Diagram for example: This baryon density is a number density - i.e. number of baryons in some volume. Why are baryon density and temperature regarded as ...
9
votes
1answer
140 views

Why Lorentz group for fields and Poincaré group for particles?

Wigner treatment associates to particles the irreps of the universal covering of the Poincaré group $$\mathbb{R}(1,3)\rtimes SL(2,\mathbb{C}).$$ Why don't we consider finite dimensional ...
2
votes
2answers
20 views

Meaning of SIS in accelerators

With reference to accelerator facilities, the term "SIS" is often used. e.g. SIS-100, SIS-300 etc. What does SIS stand for, in this context? (The last S is probably for Synchrotron) Google appears ...
26
votes
6answers
4k views

How come neutrons in a nucleus don't decay?

I know outside a nucleus, neutrons are unstable and they have half life of about 15 minutes. But when they are together with protons inside the nucleus, they are stable. How does that happen? I got ...
32
votes
5answers
3k views

How is it possible to accelerate a neutron?

It is possible to accelerate a charged particle in an electric field, how is it possible to accelerate a neutron? How can we control its velocity?
3
votes
3answers
50 views

Isotropic neutrino-lepton scattering

I'm a physics student and I'm attending an introductory course of particle physics. My professor stated that, in center of mass frame, the $\nu_\mu e^- \to \nu_\mu e^-$ elastic scattering has an ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Why can't muons be the carriers of the strong interaction?

The strong forces operate up to range of $10^{-15}$ meters. The calculations for Muon reveal that they can be propagator for distances up to $10^{-14}$ meters. Why can't I ignore the factor of 10 and ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Constant Rayleigh Scattering Cross Section

in the Review of Particle Physics - Interactions of Particles with Matter, there is a plot that gives the cross sections for different interactions of photons with matter. One of them is Rayleigh ...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Symmetry factor and coupling constant in scalar field theory

I am just now starting my particles "education" so forgive me if this is elementary... Looking at interaction terms in a scalar field Lagrangian, I get: $$ ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

How can fusion within the sun be possible if there is no such thing as helium-2 (2 protons, no neutrons)

As stated in the question where does the sun(or other star) get the necessary neutron in order to produce the Helium atom? and how does this process occur (explain how the neutron incorporates).
23
votes
7answers
2k views

How do we know photons have spin 1?

Electrons have spin 1/2, and as they are charged, they also have an associated magnetic moment, which can be measured by an electron beam splitting up in an inhomogeneous magnetic field or through the ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Difference between particle-antiparticle decay and particle collision at high energy? [closed]

Can one show the difference between particle-antiparticle anhilation products and particle collision products at high energy? Is there a difference in the end products? For example, could in both ...
4
votes
1answer
262 views

Matter and antimatter differences?

I've heard (and after googling for a while, found) that the only difference between matter and anti-matter is simply charge. This bothers me when it comes to the neutron. Matter and anti-matter ...
8
votes
3answers
320 views

How did Pauli and Fermi deduce the existence of the neutrino? [duplicate]

From Wikipedia: The neutrino was postulated first by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to explain how beta decay could conserve energy, momentum, and angular momentum (spin). In contrast to Niels Bohr, who ...
4
votes
2answers
146 views

Which is the lightest thing in this universe? Is that a photon or neutrino?

I hear a lot of people saying that neutrino is the lightest subatomic particle but according to me a photon must be the lightest as nothing can travel faster than light because it gets heavier and ...
2
votes
3answers
144 views

Detecting negative energy products in particle accelerators

Are the detectors in a typical particle accelerator experiment, either in Fermilab, or now in LHC, sensitive to negative energy particles? How would a negative energy particle, (say, a negative ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Conservation of charge on Higgs production by bremsstrahlung

The Higgs production channel $$q+\bar{q} \rightarrow W^++ H^0,$$ depicted below, seems to be violating charge conservation, or am I missing something? The quark and its antiquark have the same ...
11
votes
2answers
533 views

Why can the Euler beta function be interpreted as a scattering amplitude?

The Wikipedia article on the Veneziano Amplitude claims that the Euler beta function can be interpretted as a scattering amplitude. Why is this? In another word, when the Euler beta function is ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Is there a machine readable format of the data tables in Particle Data Group PDFs?

Is there a machine-readable format of the tables of data in PDG documents such as this one? http://pdg.lbl.gov/2011/download/rpp-2010-booklet.pdf Something such as JSON, XML, CSV, HTML, or anything ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

How does the number of events per bunch collision scale (as function of energy, luminosity …)

Looking at Table 1 of Burton Richter's recent article High Energy Colliding Beams; What Is Their Future? I'm wondering how the number of events per bunch collision ("$N_b$") scales for the collider ...
4
votes
1answer
70 views

Understanding the Particle Data Group review documents

Would someone mind outlining what each piece of semi-structured data means in these images taken of some PDG documents? As a newcomer it is very difficult to interpret the tables. tl;dr This ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

What does the first column in the “decay modes” table mean (in Particle Data Group documents)?

As a follow-up to this more general question, what are the values in the first column of each of the "decay tables" in a PDG document describing? What are those things in the first column? Are they ...
2
votes
2answers
65 views

Where can I find the datasets from LHC?

I know that most of the datasets from ATLAS or other particle physics experiments are terabytes, but I was just curious is there any place where one can find them to download? And one more question, ...
65
votes
2answers
10k views

Why doesn't matter pass through other matter if atoms are 99.999% empty space?

The ghostly passage of one body through another is obviously out of the question if the continuum assumption were valid, but we know that at the micro, nano, pico levels (and beyond) this is not even ...
6
votes
3answers
316 views

Why are there no elementary charged, spin-zero particles?

In the spirit of a related inquiry, I would like to know if there's a basis for understanding why there aren't any elementary particles that have non-zero electric charge but zero spin? Can such a ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

A particle has $\overrightarrow{r}(0)=4m(\hspace{2pt}\hat{j}\hspace{2pt})$ and $\overrightarrow{v}(0)=(2m/s^2)\hat{i}$ [closed]

I am having trouble with these problems, and I want to gain a understanding of how to solve these. I'll put what I have tried at the end, even though I don't think it'll be of help. A particle has ...
12
votes
4answers
985 views

Why are neutrinos more weakly interacting than light?

When people describe neutrino interactions they describe them as rare/infrequent due to the fact that the neutrinos are electrically neutral and have little mass, if any. Well why then is the photon ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

What does the size of an object have to do with it's color?

Stephen Hawking mentions in his book 'A Brief History of Time' that quarks are much smaller than the wavelength of visible light so they do not have any color in the normal sense. What exactly does ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

What is the change in energy of $ \Delta e = h \nu $ in respect to?

I saw this equation today when calculating energies of photons of different frequencies, and noticed that the change in energy is a product of plank's constant and frequency. $$\Delta e = h * \nu $$ ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

What's the value of the coupling constant in interacting field theories?

Consider this Lagrangian : $L = \frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu \Phi)^2 - \frac{M^2}{2}\Phi^2 +\frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu \phi)^2 -\frac{m^2}{2} \phi^2 -\mu\Phi\phi^2$ Its interaction term is given by : ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Inclusive and exclusive searches [duplicate]

Please, I would like to know what means inclusive and exclusive searches in High Energy Physics. Thanks in advance. Fábio.
2
votes
1answer
289 views

Why isn't the quark charge taken as primitive?

Why are electrons taken implicitly to be the elementary charge? It would save a lot of fractions in particle physics problems.
4
votes
3answers
198 views

Majorana Mass For Neutrinos In Standard Model

Neutrinos can't be given Dirac masses because there is no $SU(2)_L$ singlet right handed neutrinos in the standard model. But can neutrinos be given Majorana masses in the standard model? EDIT: Why ...
3
votes
0answers
61 views

Understanding the effective low-energy Lagrangian for hadrons

My course in Higgs Physics is discussing a two-nucleon low-energy effective theory of hadron interaction. With $\psi=(p,n)$, the pion is defined as $\vec{\pi}= i \bar{\psi}\vec{\tau} \gamma_5 ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Nuclear Interaction Stopping Power

Hello again question board. I'm in need of some help with my b) question for homework I have. Following question is verbatim: "How thick should a wall of shielding iron be to absorb a 10 GeV/c pion ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Scalar Particles, Flavor Changing Processes and Gauge Symmetries

Let's consider an extended version of the Standard Model (SM) with a new Yukawa operator of the form $$ \sum_\ell g_\ell\bar{\ell}\ell \phi ,$$ where $\ell$ is any lepton of the SM and $\phi$ is a new ...