Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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Antineutron repelled by gravity?

I was reading an old post, Can gravity be shielded, like electromagnetism?. One of the responses had this comment. There are some experiments trying to measure whether antiprotons ( antimatter) ...
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22 views

the different settling speed of two solid particles in fluid

In a container full of fluid A, which can be water or oil, I have two solid particles, both of which are of the same material. These two particles are of different size. One is bigger than the other ...
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64 views

How many quantum fields are there?

I'm just an aficionado, but my understanding is that in QFT, the photon is an excitation of the electromagnetic field, the electron is an excitation of the electron field, and so on. Is there a ...
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51 views

Is the only difference between two particles their location and momentum?

Maybe this would be better suited for philosphy.se, if so, then let me know and i'll move it, but this seemed like a reasonable place to start. Let's start with my motivations for asking such a ...
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1answer
47 views

Direct and indirect CP violation

Experimentally, what is the difference between direct and indirect CP violation? An example of indirect CP violation is: $$ \Gamma(\overline{B}^0 \rightarrow B^0) \neq \Gamma(B^0 \rightarrow ...
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61 views

Is the $\nu_e$ massive?

Neutrino oscillations imply that the $\nu_\tau$ is more massive than the $\nu_\mu$, and the $\nu_\mu$ is more massive than the $\nu_e$, so it's inferred that the $\nu_\mu$ and $\nu_\tau$ have mass. ...
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22 views

Hot air particles

I have a question- albeit random one!. I recently visited a friends place who used a standard shovel from the shed as a tool for moving hot charcoals around a pizza oven. Unfortunately the shovel was ...
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1answer
109 views

Do subatomic particles have finite size?

We know atoms are mostly "made" out of empty space, so the nucleus and all the subatomic particle are very small in compared to the magnitude of the atoms. We also know that atoms are incredibly ...
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43 views

is electromagnetic phenomena and particle behavior dependent on dark matter?

Dark matter permeates space and coalesce s in its own gravitational attraction. It neither absorbs or emits light or interacts well with baryonic matter. It deflects light on a path and is the sub ...
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35 views

Colliding proton-proton and antiproton-antiproton?

Would there be any difference in the measurable observables between collisions of proton-proton and antiproton-antiproton? I guess that colliding protons with anti-protons enable far more ...
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31 views

What is the charge/matter distribution?

I am a mathematics student who is doing an introductory course in nuclear physics and since the course is rather elementary a lot of the definitions/derivations are skipped which makes it quite tough ...
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88 views

Why does gg fusion dominate over q qbar annihilation at the LHC?

The cross section of top quark pair production is dominated at the LHC by gluon-gluon fusion, whereas at Tevatron, quark-antiquark annihilation is more prevalent. Why is this? I know the fundamental ...
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40 views

Pion decay exercise in Griffiths books

I have questions about pion decay problem. In Griffith "Introduction to Elementary Particles" 1st edition, 1987, question number 10.10 : Analyze $\pi^-$ decay as a scattering process, using the ...
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1answer
88 views

First-order EM Feynman diagram?

Is there any 1st order electromagnetic Feynman diagram? I.e. a process whose probability is just $\propto \alpha_{EM}$? If not, is there any physical reason why? We always need at least two particles ...
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1answer
60 views

Order of Feynman diagrams for electroweak processes?

I want to compare two Feynman diagrams and be able to say which one describes a process that is more likely to happen. As far as I understand, this is done by considering the order of the diagram. ...
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1answer
80 views

how can a particle can have a spin of 2 [duplicate]

i have seen some analogies of spin using playing cards but i am struggling to grasp the concept due to this making no sense in terms of playing cards
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57 views

Is it possible that neutrinos or some other sub-atomic particle contributes to radioactive decay?

According to Wikipedia: For most radioactive nuclides, the half-life depends solely on nuclear properties and is essentially a constant. It is not affected by external factors such as ...
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1answer
55 views

How can silicon have a capacity of 8 electrons in the outer shell?

I was reading an article on how solar cells work in this website- http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/solar-cell2.htm In that website I have a doubt in the first paragraph i.e.- ...
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67 views

Why do the $u$ and $d$ quark not have an associated quantum number?

All the other quarks ($c$,$s$,$b$ and $t$) have quantum numbers of charmness, strangeness, bottomness and topness that are conserved in strong interactions. This allows, among other things, flavour ...
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50 views

Direct interaction theory

I got to know about a kind of theory or formulation of EM which doesn't have the idea of fields in it. In that theory I guess field isn't that which mediates the force between two charged particles. ...
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1answer
42 views

Neutral $K$ and $B$ mesons decay to 2 photons?

The neutral pion $\pi^0$ decays almost exclusively to 2 photons, $\pi^0 \rightarrow \gamma \gamma$, which got me thinking: Can we have $K^0 \rightarrow \gamma \gamma$ and $B^0 \rightarrow \gamma ...
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1answer
47 views

Why does the pion not undergo netural particle oscillation?

$K$, $B$ and now $D$ mesons exhibit neutral particle oscillation, where we see the spontaneous interchange between a particle and its antiparticle, i.e. $K^0 \Leftrightarrow \overline{K}^0$, $B^0 ...
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1answer
81 views

Particle physics: Why is J^P called spin parity if J is the total angular momentum?

Here is the question I am working on: "The Ξ- has spin parity=½+. It decays through the weak interaction into a Λ0 and a π- meson. If the spin parity of the Λ0 particle is 1/2+ and the spin parity of ...
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Will the new LHC data falsify some theories? [closed]

There are plenty of extensions of the Standard Model, that all agree until the energy scales that have already been explored, but will differ at the new energy range of 14 TeV. This means the data ...
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87 views

Does a photon emitted in a potential well due to transitions undergoe a blueshift?

This idea is related to that of gravitational redshift. As a photon climbs away from a gravity source it loses energy. In case of the finite potential well or infinite potential well as the transition ...
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171 views

Methods of detecting gravitino DM and possible implications for theories of everything

Let me summarize my thoughts about topics in theoretical physics: Theory of everything: The theory of everything aims to unite all the four forces of nature into one single elegant equation. ...
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80 views

Pair-annihilation why does it occour? [duplicate]

Why does pair annihilation occur with particles and only their matching anti-particle? E.g., electrons and positrons, but not protons and positrons? What is the difference?
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113 views

Gravity vs. Electromagnetism Scenario

Imagine a two dimensional world where there are only two electrons. They are set right beside each other. Of course, immediately they will start to separate, being repelled. My question is, as they ...
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46 views

Understanding percentage dose-depth curves

I just have a little question regarding dose-depth curves. When you look at them, you have on the y-axis the dose, and on the x-axis the depth into your material. What I'm not sure of is how I ...
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1answer
65 views

What is the energy threshhold to produce Cherenkov radiation?

I am in a nuclear course right now and am getting some misleading information from different sources. I am trying to figure out what the minimum total energy is that a proton must have in order to ...
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1answer
51 views

Maximum Momentum of Neutral Pion

I'm considering the reaction $p + p \rightarrow p + p + \pi^0$. To find the maximum momentum that the $\pi^0$ can have after this reaction in the center-of-mass frame, what I am doing is assuming the ...
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1answer
110 views

Why can't a high intensity beam be injected into the LHC when the machine is empty

Watching this YouTube video about the LHC at around 3 minutes and 50 seconds into the video the narrator says... For machine protection reasons we are not allowed to inject a high intensity beam ...
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57 views

Fujikawa's method for 2+1-dimensional parity anomaly?

Fujikawa's chiral rotation method is applied to calculate 3+1 dimensional chiral anomaly in many textbooks, but is there any counterpart of that method in deriving 2+1 dimensional parity anomaly, i.e. ...
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441 views

5 sigma result proof for particle discovery

Source: Carrolls : "Particle at The End of The Universe" P. 177 I am just checking my understanding of Carroll's point about "a 5 sigma result being the gold standard" of experimental proof. ...
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68 views

If I were to keep increasing the mass of particles I throw at a double slit, at what point would it stop creating an interference pattern? [duplicate]

Why don't things like tennis balls create interference patterns when thrown at double slits? Where's the limit where it stops interfering?
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24 views

Interaction rates from cross sections in a thermalized gas

Consider a target particle embedded in a gas with a thermal distribution of velocities. If we know the cross section $\sigma$ for interactions between the target particle and a gas particle, how do we ...
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111 views

Is there a fundamental interaction responsible for quantum entanglement?

Quantum entanglement seems to share information between particles instantaneously, as well as characteristics of these particles through changes that occur in each particle. If forces transfer energy ...
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58 views

Does a force being applied in an ideal case to an object of infinite mass where there is no friction always result in an acceleration?

So if yes is your answer to my question then does that mean that the property of the object that resists this acceleration ie.(mass) if is infinity in the equation acceleration= force/mass would'nt ...
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1answer
110 views

Is there a mistake in a QFT textbook?

I tried to calculate one of the problems in the textbook Gauge Theory of Elementary Particle Physics by Ta-Pei Cheng and Ling-Fong Li. On page 248 you can find the following calculation of a loop ...
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63 views

Is there experimental evidence supporting the equivalence principle between different particles?

Knowing virtually nothing of GR, and only hints of particle theory, this might be something of a naive question. If I've misunderstood somethings, I would gladly like to know why. Perhaps a more ...
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LArTPC muon sign determination

What are some techniques for muon sign determination (w/o magnetic field) for fully contained muons, using statistical analysis? Especially because liquid Argon time projection chambers' sign ...
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60 views

Equivalence of delta functions when calculating decay rate [closed]

$\newcommand{\bs}{\boldsymbol}$ Hello, I'm currently working through the lecture notes of my Theoretical Particle Physics course, and there, we are calculating the decay rate of the following process ...
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2answers
67 views

Is it possible to make an electromagnetic shield?

Is it possible to make an electromagnetic shield to protect something (or ourselves) against things like bullets, human attacks, metals thrown on us or simple dust particles to protect a spaceship ...
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1answer
62 views

Can an Atom be negatively as well as positively charged simultaneously?

For example there are three atoms- atom A, atom B, atom C. Atom A has 3 electrons, atom B has 4 electrons and atom C has 2 electrons. If we bring together atom A and atom B, in this case atom A is ...
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7k views

Why doesn't light affect a compass?

In our daily life a lot of photons of visible light, infrared and radio etc move around us. We know that light is an electromagnetic radiation. So why doesn't that electromagnetic radiation affect a ...
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114 views

Does a photon travel in all directions?

For example i am standing and a beam of light is passing in front of me. I am able to see that beam of light so does it mean that photons are travelling in all directions other than the photons which ...
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1answer
59 views

Experimental evidence for Z boson coupling to right handed fermions

I do have a question about electro-weak interactions. I know the Z boson is an admixture of two fields, one that couples only to the left-handed part of the fermions (the neutral field introduced to ...
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1answer
72 views

Virtual particles and the scaling effect on valence quarks

Inside a proton there are 3 valance quarks. In addition, there is constant creation and annihilation of gluon, quarks and anti-quarks. The number of virtual particles we observe depends on how ...
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106 views

Discovery of spin-3 particle at LHCb

I just read a discussion on the CERN website regarding first observation of a heavy flavored spin-3 particle at LHCb. This appears to be a post from last July. Is there anyone knowledgeable enough in ...
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249 views

Free parameters in the Standard Model

From my understanding of the standard model, I understand that there are 19 or 20 free parameters that we need to put in by hand as, and I'm guessing here, there is as yet no theoretical basis for ...