Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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3
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2answers
216 views

Strings and their masses

How do strings present in particles give mass to them? Is it only by vibrating? I have been trying to find the answer but could not find it anywhere, can this question be answered?
1
vote
0answers
108 views

What's the most precise test of electroweak unification in the standard model?

As I understood, there is a coincidence of the weak coupling constant $g$ calculated in two different ways: 1) The muon lifetime $\tau_{\mu}$ is related to $g$ by the formula $(m_{\mu} c^2)^5 \tau_{\...
0
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0answers
551 views

Will the absorption of high energy gamma rays end up heating the absorping material?

By high energy I mean 100+ MeV gamma rays. I think that at this energy of photons, pair production is the dominating absorption process. So, as known, in pair production an electron and a positron ...
0
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1answer
146 views

Does halving the intensity of a gamma ray mean absorbing half its energy?

Say a 1 MeV gamma ray is shielded by 1 cm (halving thickness) of lead. Now, what does "havling the intensity" mean ? Like will the new gamma ray exit with energy of 0.5 MeV ? and by that we can say ...
10
votes
2answers
621 views

Nambu-Goldstone bosons from a quantum anomaly symmetry breaking?

We know that: Nambu-Goldstone bosons come from Goldstone theorem: a spontaneous (continuous)-symmetry breaking of the system leads to massless scalar modes. quantum anomaly: is the anomalous ...
9
votes
1answer
123 views

B-meson naming convention

An unbarred $B$-meson contains $\bar{b}$ (an anti-bottom quark), whereas a barred $\bar{B}$-meson contains $b$ (a bottom quark). What is the historical reason for this hellish naming convention?
8
votes
1answer
462 views

How to distinguish high-energetic muons and electrons in the CMS and ATLAS muon detectors?

At a typical energy of about 100 GeV, a muon has a Lorentz factor of about 1000, an electron about 200.000. The flight time to the detector should be around 30 ns (assuming d= 10m from the collision ...
0
votes
1answer
221 views

Are black holes stationary?

If light/energy with zero mass hits the speed limit, are black holes with infinite density at a universal standstill with everything moving relative to them? Am I barking up the wrong tree as they ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Storing kinetic energy in bonds

Let's assume a setup with a static linear molecule with three identical atoms connected by bonds and a single atom, identical to the other three, being shot at the molecule. Let's also assume that ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Asymmetry in muon energies of public CMS dimuon event data

CMS published for educational purposes (caveat) 100.000 dimuon events: https://cms-docdb.cern.ch/cgi-bin/PublicDocDB//ShowDocument?docid=11583 As one easily sees, column 4 shows the first muon's ...
2
votes
0answers
77 views

Weak decays classification

Sir, We often read about Cabibbo Favourite, Singly Cabibbo Suppressed and Doubly Cabibbo Suppressed decays. I have two questions: I understand that the suppressed decays are rarer but why are ...
9
votes
2answers
568 views

Could spontaneous symmetry breaking happen again in our universe?

It is generally believed that $10^{-35}$ seconds after the Big Bang, the symmetry of a GUT was broken and after $10^{-12}$ seconds the electroweak force was broken: \begin{equation} \mathrm{SU(2)} \...
1
vote
1answer
477 views

How is the energy distributed in a proton-antiprotion annihilation?

I know the products of the annihilation, but I don't know how much energy each particle has or gets. For example I know that 1876 MeV is released for each annihilation. Now, this energy is distributed ...
4
votes
2answers
843 views

Energy measurement of W- and Z- bosons

W bosons decay into an electron and electron-neutrino or into a muon and muon-neutrino. The W lifetime is about $3 \cdot 10^{-25} s$, that means the decay occurs close to the collision point, not in ...
3
votes
1answer
116 views

Neutral current: terminology

In particle physics, where does the term 'neutral current' originate? An example would be an electron exchanging a Z boson with another electron. I understand that the Z boson itself is neutral, but ...
30
votes
6answers
8k views

How do we know photons have spin 1?

Electrons have spin 1/2, and as they are charged, they also have an associated magnetic moment, which can be measured by an electron beam splitting up in an inhomogeneous magnetic field or through the ...
0
votes
1answer
468 views

The future of supersymmetry [duplicate]

Considering the fault of any experimental evidence from LHC for supporting the supersymmetry idea until now, can we say that it is dead? Generally the people who are working on this subject say that ...
6
votes
2answers
677 views

What is the percentage of useful energy do we get from matter-antimatter annihilation?

This is a theoretical question since we haven't made enough antimatter to try it in reality of course. But I am asking about the physics part in this. Also, by "useful energy" I mean the energy we ...
13
votes
2answers
4k views

If atoms never “physically” touch each others, then how does matter-antimatter annihilation happen?

It is known that matter and antimatter annihilate each other when they "touch" each other. And as far as I know, the concept of "touching" as our brain gets it is not true on the atomic level since ...
0
votes
2answers
264 views

Achieving almost the speed of light

I am much interested in physics. I have been caught up with one serious question related to speed of light. Hearing about Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is said that protons in there are accelerated ...
2
votes
2answers
546 views

Is it possible for dark matter to somehow turn into regular matter?

Is it possible for dark matter to create the regular matter that we, the stars, and the galaxies are made of? The reason I'm asking this is because I have a hard time imagining how something can ...
6
votes
1answer
351 views

Fundamental Higgs vs. pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson: experimental fingerprints

If we consider the 126 Higgs-like boson as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, what are the experimental fingerprints of that case? What are the main differences, in a purely effective field theory ...
8
votes
3answers
3k views

How do I know the proton isn't made of 3 anti-down quarks?

I have a proton, how do I know that it is made of 2 up quarks and 1 down quark or if it is made of 3 anti-down quarks, each with different color charges? This question is also applicable to the ...
2
votes
2answers
495 views

Why is the Higgs boson created so infrequently at the CERN collider?

Although each collision at CERN has the available energy to create a Higgs boson each time, the vast majority of the time it does not create one. I suspect that part of the reason for this is that ...
9
votes
2answers
979 views

Is everything made of massless particles?

Photons have no mass. Yet they interact gravitationally, as all energy does, with other energetic and massive particles. This means that if you put multiple photons in a system, you get something that ...
5
votes
1answer
813 views

Atoms' excitation energies as derived from Frank-Hertz experiment data

I'm analyzing the experimental data obtained during Frank-Hertz experiment (conducted with Hg atoms): Accelerating voltage values were multiplied by 0.1 during measurement (i.e. the mean value of ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

In nuclear fusion reaction, what is the percentage of mass converted to energy?

I read somewhere that it is about one percent of the mass, but I find this too high. Also I have done some calculations, for example, the Tsar Bomba was 50 MT bomb and weighed about 27 tons. Although ...
14
votes
2answers
518 views

Is there any theory for origination of charge?

We have a theory of a Higgs field that describes how a particle gets mass. Since mass and charge both are intrinsic properties of a particle, is there any similar theory for how particles get electric ...
1
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1answer
96 views

Transmutation with cosmic radiation possible?

Can cosmic radiation (alpha radiation) transmute the material of a space craft, particular carbon, titanium and aluminum? Where can i find transmutation tables or formulas to calculate the ...
0
votes
1answer
155 views

beta decay equation balance

Quark doesn't constitutes more fundamental particle and proton and neutron consist of quarks. Now come to beta decay. $n \rightarrow p + e^{-} + \bar{\nu}_e $ How can an electron emit from ...
1
vote
1answer
567 views

Calculating an energy of an electron with known De Broglie wavelength (why can't we calculate it similar than we do it for a photon)

Lets say we have an electron with known De Broglie wavelength $\lambda$. Can anyone justify or explain why we calculate its energy $E$ using 1st the De Broglie relation $\lambda = h/p$ to get momentum ...
4
votes
1answer
256 views

Full calculation of B meson mixing amplitude

I am trying to calculate B mixing in the Standard Model (in preparation to go beyond the SM). I have no trouble doing the gamma matrix algebra etc. but the loop integral keeps tripping me up. In my ...
0
votes
0answers
86 views

Neutrons in nucleus

When I asked here why neutrons in nucleus (with protons) don't decay I was told that it would require energy for the neutron to decay, it wouldn't give energy. And since that wasn't really what I ...
-1
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1answer
505 views

Does the particle vibrate in 3D space? [closed]

As far as I know, particles vibrate with a frequency and wavelength determined by their energy level. Is this vibration in 3D space?
7
votes
1answer
800 views

Proton Radius Puzzle, Is it possible that proton's radius differ depending on how you measure it? What does that even mean?

I just read this NewScientist article, and I was stunned by its results. So I found the original paper here on arxiv. In the introduction of the paper it is stated: The recent determination of ...
-7
votes
1answer
258 views

how can u control the speed of light? [closed]

Light traveling in a lake goes at 3 km/sec. Please tell me how to limit the speed in the medium (in this case the the lake).
2
votes
1answer
357 views

At CERN - What do you call the moment (event) particles crash together in the particle accelerator? [closed]

At CERN - What do you call the moment (event) particles crash together in the particle accelerator? At CERN they crash different particles together and measure what comes out. What is the name of the ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Why does positronium decay into 2 photons more often than into 3 photons?

I cannot find the answer to the above question. I know that para-positronium is created with a probability of $25\%$ and decays into 2 photons, while ortho-positronium is created with a probability ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Is the electromagnetic force responsible for contact forces? [duplicate]

It is commonly stated that there are four fundamental forces, or interactions, in nature. It is natural to consider which of those is responsible for the normal force we meet in elementary physics. ...
1
vote
1answer
196 views

Why neutrons in nucleus don't decay?

In this question it is explained that neutrons in nucleus don't decay because the next state would not be lower in energy than the previous. How come neutrons in a nucleus don't decay? But it ...
6
votes
2answers
938 views

Is it possible to create a new element that doesn't exist in the universe?

When I say something new I do not refer to something already made like H,O etc and when I mean something new I do not refer to a transformation like tritium to helium and gold. If so how ?(I mean is ...
2
votes
2answers
138 views

What are the consequences in high-energy of the non-interaction of the Higgs Field?

At high-energies when the Higgs field won't affect (interact with) particles, when the symmetry breaking won't occur, what would be $\rm W\pm$ or $\rm Z^{0}$ bosons speed if they would then have a $0$ ...
2
votes
2answers
866 views

2 protons collision (both with different kinetic energies) - I don't know what to put in for $p^2c^2$

The problem statement: Two protons with kinetic energies $W_{k1}=4GeV$ and $W_{k2}=2GeV$ colide and form new particles. What is the mass of newly born particles? There are as many as possible ...
0
votes
0answers
471 views

Pair annihilation - how to generaly solve these types of problems?

Simple question regarding pair production: Can a collision of an electron with a positron result in two photons? I have this problem to solve and I doubt this is even possible. Please provide some ...
2
votes
2answers
454 views

Slowing down high energy neutrinos?

Which atoms can slow down high energy neutrinos? I mean in which medium high energy neutrinos will tend to slow?
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Mass and Higgs Field and Inertia [duplicate]

I'm starting to wonder if the description of Mass given to us when we hear physicists talk about Mass created by the Higgs field is the same type of mass we ordinarily think of, like inertial mass for ...
0
votes
0answers
73 views

Preons and 't Hooft condition

If some fundamental particles, like leptons or quarks are composite (e.g.in preonic models), or the same with gauge bosons or the higgs particles. How could it be possible that preons were more ...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

What would be the result of the collision of two down quarks?

Even if we can't have single quarks in nature because of the charge colour, what would be the result of the collision of two down quarks at high velocities (0,99% c) at high energies, like the ones of ...
7
votes
5answers
5k views

Can one create mass from energy?

Due to $ E =m c^2 $, one can convert mass to energy. A classic example would be matter/anti-matter annihilation to produce energy (photons, etc.). Can one do the reverse? So could one do something to ...