Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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Why are the third generation superpartners lighter than the other sfermions in MSUGRA

In the MSUGRA breaking scenario, the stop particle typically appears at energies reachable at the LHC. Other sfermions, notably the partners of up, down, strange and charm are assumed to be degenerate ...
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2answers
286 views

What happens if up quarks are replaced by down quarks and down quarks are replaced by up quarks?

I believe the quarks would flip the proton's internal charge, reverse the spin of the proton, transform into another flavor, and then become unconfined and free.
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2answers
370 views

More on matter and anti-matter

1.) Does every particle that has rest mass also have an anti-particle with which it would annihilate? 2.) Does annihilation only occur between like particles? For example what happens if a ...
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6answers
6k views

How come neutrons in a nucleus don't decay?

I know outside a nucleus, neutrons are unstable and they have half life of about 15 minutes. But when they are together with protons inside the nucleus, they are stable. How does that happen? I got ...
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1answer
399 views

What's so unphysical about $W^{\mu}_3$ and $B^{\mu}$?

Imposing SU(2) and U(1) local gauge invariance introduces 4 gauge bosons, two of which correspond to $W^{\pm}$ bosons. The other two gauge fields $W^{\mu}_3$ and $B^{\mu}$ however are said not to ...
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2answers
273 views

Is there a theoretical upper bound on the mass any new particles can have?

One possible outcome of the collision experiments at LHC is the discovery of new elementary particles with large mass. Is there a theoretical way to derive an upper bound on the mass of elementary ...
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2answers
1k views

115 GeV, 170 GeV, and the noncommutative standard model

Several years ago, noncommutative geometry was used to describe the standard model, somehow yielding a prediction of 170 GeV for the mass of the Higgs boson, a prediction which was falsified a few ...
7
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2answers
267 views

What are the main differences between $p p$ and $p \bar p$ colliders

I know that it is somehow related to the parton distribution functions, allowing specific reactions with gluons instead of quarks and anti-quarks, but I would really appreciate more detailed answers ! ...
11
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1answer
3k views

What is the significance of the QCD scale parameter $\Lambda$?

I see that it appears as a constant in the relation for the running of the strong coupling constant. What is its significance? Does it have to be established by experiment? Is it somehow a scale for ...
7
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between 'running' and 'current' quark mass?

When looking at the PDG, there is a difference between the 'running' and the 'current' quark masses. Does anyone know which is the difference between these two?
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2answers
866 views

What is the current status of the anomalous muon magnetic moment?

Many years ago, a discrepancy was found between the experimentally measured value of the muon magnetic moment, and the theoretically calculated value. Shockingly, most physicists were blase about it. ...
2
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1answer
197 views

When do we expect to get results from the LHC?

At the current LHC luminosities, will it take years to detect the Higgs boson, superpartners, or any other forms of new physics at the LHC? What should particle physicists do in the meantime? We ...
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5answers
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Is there the smallest particle that can be guaranteed to be unable to be broken down into smaller particles?

Is there the smallest particle that can be guaranteed to be unable to be broken down into smaller particles?
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1answer
110 views

Where can I get the most accurate measurements of parton distribution functions?

Where would I look to get the most accurate experimental values of parton distribution functions for the proton? I know these functions aren't measured directly, but I'd basically like to find a fit ...
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2answers
565 views

Where can I find the measured magnetic moments of the quarks?

I read that the magnetic moment of the proton can be expressed as the sum of the magnetic moments of the three quarks like $\mu_p = \frac{4}{3}\mu_u - \frac{1}{3}\mu_d$. But I couldn't find a table ...
6
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3answers
570 views

Is there a maximum number of types of elementary particles?

Doing a Google search i found a paper called The maximum number of elementary particles in a super symmetric extension of the standard model. It claims in the abstract that the upper bound is 84 (i ...
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1answer
213 views

Is the quantum state or information of a particle is all that differentiates it from another particle?

So I have learned in my QM classes that you can't tell one electron from another electron. They are indistinguishable. I also learned that the wavefunction of a particle includes the spacial part and ...
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6answers
13k views

Is there an equation for the strong nuclear force?

The equation describing the force due to gravity is $$F = G \frac{m_1 m_2}{r^2}.$$ Similarly the force due to the electrostatic force is $$F = k \frac{q_1 q_2}{r^2}.$$ Is there a similar equation ...
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3answers
3k views

Why electrons behave as a particle and also as a wave?

Why do electrons (and other very small particles) sometimes behave as particles (i.e. when we are not looking at them) where as other times they behave as waves?
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0answers
230 views

Did the LHC just find a Z' boson? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Did the guys at Fermilab find a fifth force? Did the LHC just find a Z' boson, or is it just your typical media overblown sensationalism with no basis in fact?
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2answers
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Did the researchers at Fermilab find a fifth force?

Please consider the publication Invariant Mass Distribution of Jet Pairs Produced in Association with a W boson in $p\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV by the CDF-Collaboration, ...
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5answers
1k views

How can a point-particle have properties?

I have trouble imagining how two point-particles can have different properties. And how can finite mass, and finite information (ie spin, electric charge etc.) be stored in 0 volume? Not only that, ...
14
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1answer
5k views

Phase shifts in scattering theory

I have been studying scattering theory in Sakurai's quantum mechanics. The phase shift in scattering theory has been a major conceptual and computational stumbling block for me. How (if at all) does ...
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6answers
3k views

Massless charged particles

Are there any massless (zero invariant mass) particles carrying electric charge? If not, why not? Do we expect to see any or are they a theoretical impossibility?
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1answer
430 views

Decay of SUSY particles

In discussion of LHC searches for SUSY particles, physicists seem to assume they will decay quickly to the lightest SUSY particle which then remains stable (at least within the time it takes to leave ...
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3answers
493 views

Size of atoms based on atomic number

I'm interested in the size of atoms (extent of the outermost electron cloud), in particular its cross-sectional area and how it scales by increasing Z. (I trust that this won't be affected much by ...
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3answers
2k views

Does a particle annihilate only with its antiparticle? If yes, why?

Or to put the question another way - what is the result of a proton-positron collision, or an up quark-charm antiquark collision, etc.? As far as I know, annihilation happens only between particles of ...
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8answers
2k views

What future technologies does particle physics and string theory promise? [closed]

What practical application can we expect from particle physics a century or two from now? What use can we make of quark-gluon plasmas or strange quarks? How can we harness W- and Z-bosons or the Higgs ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between a neutron and hydrogen?

Differences? They are both an electron and a proton, since the neutron decays to a proton and an electron, what's the difference between a neutron and proton + electron? so is it just a higher binding ...
4
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1answer
1k views

Difference between Higgs and anti-Higgs Fields

I'm assuming the LHC can create a Higgs and an anti-Higgs boson. If so, would their fields be identical with respect to mass effects? How would LHC detectors distinguish between the two bosons?
7
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3answers
341 views

References on the non-compositeness of the known elementary particles

What paper(s) or theory(s) describe or prove that the elementary particles that we have determined today cannot be made up of smaller more fundamental particles?
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3answers
456 views

Young's experiment or why the light can't be described as a particle [closed]

Who hasn't heard about the double-slit experiment? It figures in any book of quantum physics. But there is something no one can explain to me : I understand why the light cannot be described only as a ...
4
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2answers
238 views

CPT violation and how could quark masses differ from anti-quark masses?

A recent experimental paper measures a difference between the top quark and anti-top quark masses: Fermilab-Pub-11-062-E, CDF Collaboration, Measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and ...
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2answers
1k views

Rigid body dynamics joints

I can't seem to find any info on connected rigid bodies by a joint. Can someone explain the basics to me? I'm trying to do a little research to find out how feasible it would be to implement 3d ...
8
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3answers
2k views

What actually happens when an anti-matter projectile collides with matter?

I'm trying to understand what would really happen when large quantities (e.g., 10g) of anti-matter collide with matter. The normal response is that they'd annihilate each other and generate an ...
5
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3answers
711 views

Kinetic Energy vs. Potential energy with regards to creating particles

So I know that when you collide particles with high enough kinetic energy, (kinetic energy = at least the rest mass of the particles you are making), you get particles. How come potential energy ...
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1answer
160 views

Are there notable cases of anomalies in the mass-decay rate relationship?

As a general rule of thumb, massive particles (both composite and fundamental) tend to decay rapidly through the weak force, while less massive particles tend to be more stable. Hence, taus are ...
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2answers
233 views

Mechanical momentum of the EM field in a continuum?

Given an uncharged continuum the EM field produces no force on it. Yet in a discrete system we know that atoms are not uncharged locally and momentum can be exchanged due to the electric field(Which ...
6
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5answers
510 views

What Would be the Experimental Signature of Composite Leptons?

So far, the quarks and leptons appear to be fundamental particles. But they're complicated enough that there's always been some speculation that they might be composite. What experimental evidence ...
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2answers
1k views

What Quark and Anti-quark are electrically neutral Pions made out of?

A positive pion is an up and an anti-down. A negative pion is a down and an anti-up. What's a pion with an electrical charge of 0?
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2answers
320 views

Will physic object in a perfect environment last/exist forever?

We know,i.e. wood/steel tables in earth will completely broken or disappear in a very future day. If we put the table in a perfect/ideal environment (maybe in vacuum), will the disappear/broken still ...
6
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3answers
580 views

What allows the modified Urca process to work at lower density than direct Urca in neutron star cooling?

The dominant method of neutron star cooling is neutrino emission. There are two regimes usually presented, the "direct Urca" and "modified Urca" processes, each of which are sequences of neutron decay ...
8
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2answers
841 views

What if LHC finds SUSY?

Here and on many other forums and blogs people ask the question "What if LHC does not find SUSY?". I would like to ask the opposite. What if it finds it? What would the implications be? Is it going to ...
6
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3answers
2k views

What defines the mass of elementary particle?

The electron is particle. The mass of electron is $9.10938215(45)\times 10^{−31}\, {\rm kg}$. But why is the mass exactly what it is? What in physics defines the mass of elementary particle?
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4answers
1k views

Is there an accepted analogy/conceptual aid for the Higgs field?

Is there an accepted analogy / conceptual aid for the Higgs field? In Physics there are many accepted conceptual aids such as * Schrödinger's cat * Maxwell's Demon * I'm sure I'm missing ...
6
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4answers
3k views

“The Schwarzschild Proton” paper - Is the science valid?

I'm a layman without a university background in physics / math. Since I don't have a background, reading a paper is more of an effort. Consequently, when I come across an interesting paper, I can't ...
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2answers
152 views

Mathematical Elegance in a Cosmological Theory Considered Necessary?

In general, it seems cosmological theories that encompass more and more of the phenomena of the universe are expected to be more and more mathematically elegant, in conception if not in detail. Our ...
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3answers
508 views

Cosmic ray hazards

The Pierre Auger Observatory site mentions the detection of a 3E20 eV (48 J) cosmic ray whose energy, well above the GZK cutoff, was based on an analysis of its atmospheric shower. This was equivalent ...
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1answer
183 views

Paramagnetism what about Paraweakism or Parastrongism?

Ok, I was just curious but the electromagnetic force can allow paramagnetism macroscopically in some objects. Can this be done microscopically to the subatomic level? Also, what about other forces ...
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551 views

Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry in Experiments?

As I hope is obvious to everyone reading this, the universe contains more matter than antimatter, presumably because of some slight asymmetry in the amounts of the two generated during the Big Bang. ...