Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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Invariant mass for inelastic scattering

I am trying to understand the idea of invariant mass during electron-proton inelastic scattering. For electrons with energy $E$, scattered by a stationary proton through an angle $\theta$ with energy ...
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71 views

Why does randomness exhibit a pattern in the long run? [migrated]

!!! Layman here so please avoid complex math and answers. Random (usually pseudorandom) events are usually characterized along these lines: Each outcome in a trial experiment must be i.i.d.; i.e. ...
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115 views

braiding bosons or fermions around majorana fermion

Majorana fermions are described by their topological charge. My question is whether we can see the topological charge of Majorana fermions by braiding a boson or a fermion around it ? Is the only ...
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2answers
78 views

Could Dark Energy just be particles with negative mass?

Title speaks for itself. Dark matter: We see extra attractive force, and we posit that there are particles which create such a force, and use the measure of that force to guess their locations. Dark ...
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1answer
78 views

How do scientists measure the spin-parity of a resonance?

I have seen many plots and data tables which display the cross-section vs. center of mass energy for a particular nuclear reaction at a given angle. Here is an example. You can see that there are a ...
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3answers
144 views

Is simulating the entire universe possible?

Is it concievable that we may one day simulate the entire universe with every single particle, field and law of physics factored in? Can n number of particles (say the number of particles that make up ...
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82 views

Can one proton attract two electrons?

Suppose that in an empty space there is only one proton. This proton would have created a field of positive charge which should attract possible negative electrons, so now we add two electrons on ...
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18 views

Resonant Depolarization at LEP: Simple Explanation?

I'm looking for a simple explanation of how the idea of resonant depolarization can be used to measure the beam energy at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). I understand that the amount of ...
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16 views

Calculation of removing a nucleon from a nucleus

I would like to calculate the energy needed to remove one nucleon - proton or neutron - from a nucleus. What is the equation to be used?
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4answers
99 views

What would happen if two electrons fuse?

Two electrons repel each other naturally; however, if protons can be forced to fuse, can electrons technically fuse too? What would be the product if two electrons fuse?
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1answer
105 views

How do you build a Lagrangian in particle/nuclear physics? (A specific example)

I know that the terms in the Lagrangian needs to be scalars (with respect to Lorentz symmetry etc.). Also I know that [see C. G. Tully (EPP) p. 85] in general, for $\psi$ in the fundamental ...
2
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1answer
204 views

Mølller scattering

I came across Mølller scattering today (which is just a fancy name for electron-electron scattering. I'm confused as to why there are two tree level Feynman diagrams for this process: Check out the ...
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1answer
36 views

Is anything without mass an EM wave?

For the longest time I thought the distinction between matter wave and other types of wave is the non-relativist mass of the "thing" under discussion. Photons are EM wave, electrons are matter waves. ...
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51 views

Would the blue glow of Cherenkov radiation be visible when diffused across ice, such as in the IceCube neutrino experiment?

The blue glow characteristic of Cherenkov radiation is visible emanating from underwater reactors. Is it also visible through ice, at the IceCube neutrino experiment (not that anyone is physically ...
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33 views

Trilinear term in SUSY soft-breaking

In MSSM soft-SUSY breaking, there are such term called 'A-triliear term'. But, some papers, e.g Riva-Biggio-Pomarol, do not have trilinear term. What is the use of introducing trilinear term?
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1answer
36 views

“Double-counting” in particle detectors

Apparently, when analysing events from particle detectors, one may incur in double-counting, which happens when a physics object appears as a single object of its own type, but it may also be ...
5
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1answer
54 views

What CP violating processes do we know of?

So, after going over my particle physics notes and some introducing literature, it seems the currently known processes we experimentally confirmed to be CP violating are Kaon mixing (an indirect ...
0
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1answer
30 views

The counting of all possible baryons quark combinations

I would like to ask how do you count the number of possible quark combination that could possibly exist in a baryon. I know certain spin symmetry or orbital momentum symmetry have to be conserved. But ...
3
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2answers
126 views

Global symmetry and particle multiplets

In chapter 20, of Peskin and Schroeder's quantum field theory book, they start with a comment that a global symmetry that is manifest lead to particle multiplets with restricted interactions. Can ...
3
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1answer
44 views

What does 'channel' mean?

I see many plots like the following that graph counts per channel, I know what a 'count' is, but I don't know what a 'channel' is. Could somebody please explain to me? My guess is that it is that ...
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1answer
89 views

Is the electromagnetic mass real?

In his Lectures on Physics vol II Ch.28-2 Feynman calculates the field momentum of a moving charged sphere with charge $q$, radius $a$ and velocity $\mathbf{v}$. He finds that the total momentum in ...
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2answers
144 views

How are quarks and leptons detected experimentally?

How are quarks and leptons (including subatomic particles) detected in the laboratory,especially when most hadrons and leptons have a lifespan for a considerable small amount of time?Also how do we ...
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1answer
81 views

Current knowledge of Higgs

What is the current knowledge about the Higgs field after its discovery in the LHC? Does it exactly mimic the standard model Higgs? Does this knowledge rules out the possibility of other Higgs ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Isospin of the neutral sigma baryon

I was typing up another answer on P.S.E. and I wanted to use the fact that the decay $$\Sigma^0\longrightarrow\Lambda^0+\gamma$$ does not occur strongly as an example of isospin conservation. But then ...
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1answer
33 views

Sphaleron interactions erase baryon asymmetry?

The sphaleron interactions in the standard model is $(B-L)$ conserving and $(B+L)$ violating. Each sphaleron transition causes $\Delta B$ and $\Delta L$ to change by the same amount so that ...
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1answer
78 views

Do particle decays happen instantly?

For example, let's say a W boson decays into an electron and a neutrino. Is there some transition? Does the boson fade out while the decay products fade into existence? Or does this happen in the ...
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30 views

Why Does Electron Revolve around nucleus? [duplicate]

Actually why does electron revolve around nucleus. Considering Simple atom, hydrogen atom where a single electron revolves around the nucleus. It is said that the electrostatic force of attraction ...
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4answers
4k views

If two photons collide, does the resulting particle have zero velocity?

If two photons traveling in opposite directions along the same line collide, will the resulting particle have a velocity of zero relative to the rest of time space in the instant of the collision?
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intuition about Gauge in Hall bar geometry with 4 leads

Please tell me about the kind of gauge I should use for calculating the resistance in a 4 lead hall bar geometry.As when I use Landau gauge it will make my leads transitionally invariant only along ...
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50 views

How to theoretically determine electric charges of $W^{\pm}$ bosons?

I just realised that I don't remember how to conclude theoretically that $W^{\pm}$ bosons have electric charges of $\pm 1$. After some searching I'm quite surprise that I couldn't find a satisfying ...
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1answer
62 views

Baryogenesis via Leptogenesis

Baryon number is directly violated through electroweak anomaly and so does the Lepton number, for each transition from one vacuum to another. The two violations are of equal amount $\Delta B=\Delta ...
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2answers
204 views

Why would electrons have Weak Charge? [closed]

Electrons (and, their cousins Muon and Tau) carry Weak Charge having value $-1/2$. If you believe in Strong Anthrophic Principle Why does electrons carry Weak Charge? If you don't believe in Strong ...
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3answers
53 views

In the Higgs boson experiments, why are protons used?

Why are protons used to create Higgs particles at CERN? Can anyone please explain the concepts very simply? (How to explain this to a layman?)
3
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1answer
63 views

Could synchrotron radiation be produced by a gravitational field instead of a magnetic field?

I know that synchrotron radiation is produced when a charged particle is accelerated radially by a magnetic field, but I was wondering if synchrotron radiation could also be produced by an uncharged ...
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1answer
55 views

Where does the mass of a nucleon originate in an atom?

The mass of the three quarks in the nucleons make up only about one to two percent of the mass of the nucleons. What makes up the other 98 percent?
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Summing up independent mass measurements to recover $Z$ boson mass

I am trying to calculate the $Z$ boson mass from a list of $\mu^+\mu^-$ data (momentum). We have been asked to make five blocks of data from the total amount of 10k. Then calculate the mass via ...
3
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2answers
148 views

How we see laser light if it travels in a straight path? [duplicate]

Light travels in straight path, and our eyes detects an object's reflected light then we see the object. So if laser light is going in a straight path, how come we can see laser light?
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Where does the electric force come from if an electron has no definite location?

Say electron A is nearby another electron (B), so that they may repel each other. Electron B is in a position eigenstate (so it has a definite position). But electron A is not. How does electron A ...
3
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1answer
85 views

Number conservation of bosons and fermions

Why is the number of bosons not conserved while the number of fermions is conserved? Does it have something to do with the Pauli exclusion principle?
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2answers
102 views

How to calculate the tree-level probability amplitude for the electron-positron to muon-antimuon process?

Consider the following process: $e^+ + e^- \rightarrow \mu^+ + \mu^-$. I'm trying to calculate the probability amplitude of such a process in leading order. In leading order the amplitude is given ...
21
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4answers
2k views

How come “smaller, weaker” particles are more massive (have higher energies)?

Something has always struck me as counter-intuitive: when reading about high-energy experiments such as the LHC, they are always looking for stuff on a really small scale with MASSIVE energies. I ...
2
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1answer
27 views

Eigenstates of total isospin, I

In the book from which I'm studying particle physics (by Mark Thompson) it is stated that states of two quarks of third component of isospin = 0 (like ud or du) are not eigenstates of the total ...
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Could we make things out of newly discovered particles?

Right now, all of the "stuff" that has been created in the world is made of protons, electrons, and neutrons. I'm aware that particles other than these have much shorter lifetimes. But I've also heard ...
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Can a superpartner be less massive than its SM counterpart?

Theoretically, can a superpartner be less massive than its standard model counterpart? I realize there are experimental constraints.
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Introducing inert superfield in R-symmetry model in extended MSSM

Some papers, e.g, Chakraborty et al, Frugiuele and Gregoire introduce inert superfield doublet $\hat{R}_d$ and $\hat{R}_u$. I have a question, what is the role of these inert superfields?
2
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1answer
39 views

Ambiguity in assigning intrinsic parity

We know that, fermions can have intrinsic parity either $\eta_P=+1$ or $=-1$. How does one then fix the intrinsic parities ofthe elementary particles, uniquely? Again, the intrinsic parity of a baryon ...
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1answer
38 views

Stopping power diagram

I'm currently looking at this figure, but I'm not sure how to interpret it. If I'm not mistaken, the energy loss of the muon (This is a muon that penetrates copper) is on the y-axis. But does that ...
2
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3answers
84 views

Can “particle” waves break as ocean waves do?

I have heard about electrons surfing on wake fields which got me thinking. Are there analogs to reefs for these waves and can these waves break as ocean waves do when they hit a reef?
5
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2answers
81 views

SU(3) antiquark triplet transformation

I'm reading a rather elementary particle physics text, Modern Particle Physics by Thomson. He is staying away from the heavy group theoretic stuff. He derives the transformation law for an SU(2) ...
3
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1answer
105 views

Charged current vs. neutral current neutrino interactions

I am doing research related to the detection potential of neutrino detectors and, in looking up the various neutrino interaction channels that exist in each detector, I have found the interactions ...