Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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Current knowledge of Higgs

What is the current knowledge about the Higgs field after its discovery in the LHC? Does it exactly mimic the standard model Higgs? Does this knowledge rules out the possibility of other Higgs ...
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1answer
201 views

Isospin of the neutral sigma baryon

I was typing up another answer on P.S.E. and I wanted to use the fact that the decay $$\Sigma^0\longrightarrow\Lambda^0+\gamma$$ does not occur strongly as an example of isospin conservation. But then ...
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1answer
66 views

Sphaleron interactions erase baryon asymmetry?

The sphaleron interactions in the standard model is $(B-L)$ conserving and $(B+L)$ violating. Each sphaleron transition causes $\Delta B$ and $\Delta L$ to change by the same amount so that ...
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1answer
86 views

Do particle decays happen instantly?

For example, let's say a W boson decays into an electron and a neutrino. Is there some transition? Does the boson fade out while the decay products fade into existence? Or does this happen in the ...
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0answers
32 views

Why Does Electron Revolve around nucleus? [duplicate]

Actually why does electron revolve around nucleus. Considering Simple atom, hydrogen atom where a single electron revolves around the nucleus. It is said that the electrostatic force of attraction ...
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4answers
5k views

If two photons collide, does the resulting particle have zero velocity?

If two photons traveling in opposite directions along the same line collide, will the resulting particle have a velocity of zero relative to the rest of time space in the instant of the collision?
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0answers
69 views

How to theoretically determine electric charges of $W^{\pm}$ bosons?

I just realised that I don't remember how to conclude theoretically that $W^{\pm}$ bosons have electric charges of $\pm 1$. After some searching I'm quite surprise that I couldn't find a satisfying ...
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2answers
80 views

Baryogenesis via Leptogenesis

Baryon number is directly violated through electroweak anomaly and so does the Lepton number, for each transition from one vacuum to another. The two violations are of equal amount $\Delta B=\Delta ...
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2answers
383 views

Why would electrons have Weak Charge? [closed]

Electrons (and, their cousins Muon and Tau) carry Weak Charge having value $-1/2$. If you believe in Strong Anthrophic Principle Why does electrons carry Weak Charge? If you don't believe in Strong ...
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3answers
79 views

In the Higgs boson experiments, why are protons used?

Why are protons used to create Higgs particles at CERN? Can anyone please explain the concepts very simply? (How to explain this to a layman?)
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2answers
134 views

Could synchrotron radiation be produced by a gravitational field instead of a magnetic field?

I know that synchrotron radiation is produced when a charged particle is accelerated radially by a magnetic field, but I was wondering if synchrotron radiation could also be produced by an uncharged ...
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1answer
94 views

Where does the mass of a nucleon originate in an atom?

The mass of the three quarks in the nucleons make up only about one to two percent of the mass of the nucleons. What makes up the other 98 percent?
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0answers
50 views

Summing up independent mass measurements to recover $Z$ boson mass

I am trying to calculate the $Z$ boson mass from a list of $\mu^+\mu^-$ data (momentum). We have been asked to make five blocks of data from the total amount of 10k. Then calculate the mass via ...
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2answers
531 views

How we see laser light if it travels in a straight path? [duplicate]

Light travels in straight path, and our eyes detects an object's reflected light then we see the object. So if laser light is going in a straight path, how come we can see laser light?
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2answers
634 views

Where does the electric force come from if an electron has no definite location?

Say electron A is nearby another electron (B), so that they may repel each other. Electron B is in a position eigenstate (so it has a definite position). But electron A is not. How does electron A ...
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2answers
294 views

Number conservation of bosons and fermions

Why is the number of bosons not conserved while the number of fermions is conserved? Does it have something to do with the Pauli exclusion principle?
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2answers
235 views

How to calculate the tree-level probability amplitude for the electron-positron to muon-antimuon process?

Consider the following process: $e^+ + e^- \rightarrow \mu^+ + \mu^-$. I'm trying to calculate the probability amplitude of such a process in leading order. In leading order the amplitude is given ...
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4answers
2k views

How come “smaller, weaker” particles are more massive (have higher energies)?

Something has always struck me as counter-intuitive: when reading about high-energy experiments such as the LHC, they are always looking for stuff on a really small scale with MASSIVE energies. I ...
2
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1answer
77 views

Eigenstates of total isospin, I

In the book from which I'm studying particle physics (by Mark Thompson) it is stated that states of two quarks of third component of isospin = 0 (like ud or du) are not eigenstates of the total ...
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4answers
2k views

Could we make things out of newly discovered particles?

Right now, all of the "stuff" that has been created in the world is made of protons, electrons, and neutrons. I'm aware that particles other than these have much shorter lifetimes. But I've also heard ...
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188 views

Can a superpartner be less massive than its SM counterpart?

Theoretically, can a superpartner be less massive than its standard model counterpart? I realize there are experimental constraints.
3
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1answer
57 views

Ambiguity in assigning intrinsic parity

We know that, fermions can have intrinsic parity either $\eta_P=+1$ or $=-1$. How does one then fix the intrinsic parities ofthe elementary particles, uniquely? Again, the intrinsic parity of a baryon ...
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1answer
92 views

Stopping power diagram

I'm currently looking at this figure, but I'm not sure how to interpret it. If I'm not mistaken, the energy loss of the muon (This is a muon that penetrates copper) is on the y-axis. But does that ...
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3answers
161 views

Can “particle” waves break as ocean waves do?

I have heard about electrons surfing on wake fields which got me thinking. Are there analogs to reefs for these waves and can these waves break as ocean waves do when they hit a reef?
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2answers
235 views

SU(3) antiquark triplet transformation

I'm reading a rather elementary particle physics text, Modern Particle Physics by Thomson. He is staying away from the heavy group theoretic stuff. He derives the transformation law for an SU(2) ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Charged current vs. neutral current neutrino interactions

I am doing research related to the detection potential of neutrino detectors and, in looking up the various neutrino interaction channels that exist in each detector, I have found the interactions ...
3
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1answer
188 views

Why Majorana phases cannot be removed?

Why is the extra two Majorana phases in the PMNS matrix cannot be removed if neutrinos are Majorana fermions? Or in other words, why are the Majorana phases cannot be absorbed into the redefinition of ...
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0answers
38 views

How to calculate U-spin for baryons

I am trying to calculate U-spin for sigma baryons. I don't know why U-spin for (sigma+) and (sigma-) and (sigma*+) is 1/2 but for (sigma*-) is 3/2? I know that (sigma+) and (sigma-) are octet and ...
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2answers
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What is a wave? What is a particle?

I am reading a David Bohm book on quantum theory. He says the idea that light is both a particle and a wave is incompatible: (1) we know light has particle-like properties through the photoelectric ...
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0answers
119 views

If tachyons were real, where would they originate from? [closed]

If the hypothetical tachyon existed, where would it possibly originate from? or is this question off the realms within the current state of physics. Also what are some ways physicist have tried to ...
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1answer
1k views

What happens when an atom absorb electron/photon?

I'll give you a scenario or two, and please tell me what will happen and that shall answer my question. Thanks in advance. Scenario 1: Will an atom absorb an electron with kinetic energy greater ...
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2answers
149 views

Why cross section of $e^+ e^- \to \bar{q} q$ is 3 times larger than $e^+ e^- \to \mu^+ \mu^-$?

I know the usual answer: quarks carry color charge (let us denote them r,g,b), antiquarks anti color charge, and since the initial state ($e^+ e^-$) does not carry any color charge (and color is ...
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1answer
55 views

Soft-Supersymmetry Mass (Direct contact term)

I found this term/operator in some papers that can generate masses, e.g Riva-Biggio-Pomarol(2012), Fox-Nelson-Weiner $\int d^4\theta \frac{X^\dagger X}{M^2}Q^\dagger Q$ Could anyone explain about ...
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100 views

Field Lagrangian <--> Particle Lagrangian

The action-functionals describing the motion $\mathbf{x}:[a,b]\to \mathbb{R}^3$ of a free particle of mass $m$ and the evolution $\varphi:[a,b]\times \Omega\to \mathbb{R}$ of a free scalar field of ...
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1answer
126 views

String Theory: Why should(n't) the string snap?

My question is related to a comment in the margin of the popularising site The Official String Theory Web Site. There are two basic types of string theories: those with closed string loops that ...
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1answer
68 views

does electron - positron pair annihilation occur when E is negative?

Suppose I release an electron-positron pair from rest at a distance of $r$. Then the particles attract each other and collide. The total energy $E$ is $$E = 2m_ec^2-\frac{e^2}{4\pi\varepsilon_0r},$$ ...
5
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1answer
253 views

Can the Higgs condensate be described in terms of creation operators?

In superconductivity, the BCS condensate can be described in terms of 2 creation operators (the 2 electrons of the pair) acting on the vacuum. I'm wondering whether a similar description can be given ...
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0answers
30 views

How to calculate D0->K+K- decay with QCD factorization?

I am studying the decay of D0->K+K- and I calculated the result of Branching Ratio by Naive QCD and I wrote all the equations for amplitude and branching Ration and Hamiltonian and... for this decay ...
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3answers
564 views

Wave/particle-duality as result of taking different limits of a QFT

There is an account on dualities in quantum field theories and string theories by Polchinski from last week http://arxiv.org/abs/1412.5704 At the end of page 4, he writes the wave/particle ...
2
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1answer
121 views

Is it possible to single out a proton, electron, neutron?

I've read that it's nearly impossible to take a proton from an element. But if it's "nearly" impossible then it is possible to some degree. If this has happened, what is exactly the process of taking ...
5
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1answer
283 views

Making precise the statement “particles are excitations in a quantum field”

I've been trying to self teach QFT lately. I find that the basic physical idea makes sense, and I can keep up with the mathematical formalism without too much trouble, but I'm having trouble ...
2
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0answers
57 views

What is a nucleon field?

A nucleon is either a proton or a neutron. A field is, as John Gribbin says, a physical quantity that has a value for each point in space and time. But what is meant by a nucleon field? Can anybody ...
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0answers
38 views

How come plasmon resonances of metals are capable of being tuned to different wavelengths?

I read in this article that plasmon resonances though being a pre-determined property of a metal are capable of being tuned to other wavelengths when these same metals are made into tiny ...
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1answer
86 views

How experimentalists put bounds on new physics at the LHC?

I would like to understand how experimentalists search for new physics at the LHC. Lets imagine I want to use the LHC data to put a bound on the coupling of some new physics effective operator, say, ...
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3answers
296 views

Why is every particle a sphere?

I was wondering why is everything in this universe, I mean atoms and well quarks and photons and what not some form of sphere. Is there any exploitation to the sphere being perfect and only thing for ...
4
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1answer
38 views

Why could the Homestake experiment only detect electron neutrinos

The Homestake experiment measured the incoming electron neutrino flux via $$\nu_{e}+ Cl^{37} \rightarrow Ar^{37} +e^{-}$$ Why does this reaction not apply to the other neutrino flavours? i.e. what ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Is deuterium a boson or a fermion?

I want to know if deuterium is a fermion or boson. Please give me a descriptive answer. I tried the formula that is the combination of protons and electrons which gives odd number but the answer is ...
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2answers
162 views

can we detect the photons in the interaction of two charged bodies?

if the interaction of two charged bodies is through the photon exchange: 1) how much is the energy of these photons and how do we calculate their energies? 2) can these photons be detected by a photon ...
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1answer
70 views

If we rub glass particles with paper , will there be any charge induction in glass particles?

If we rub glass particles with paper , will there be any charge induction in glass particles ? I know if you rub with silk they do get charged, but i want to know specifically for glass and paper.
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1answer
333 views

The Center of Mass for proton-proton collisions at the LHC

If bunches of protons are being circulated in both directions of the LHC collider with each proton having an energy $E_p=7$ $TeV$, then using the following "Lorentz Invariant Quantity" expression, ...