Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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What are the implications if Supersting theory is discredited? [duplicate]

Please forgive my ignorance, I am not a student of physics in any capacity, therefor my understanding of string theory is extremely limited to say the least. Based on the recent lack of evidence in ...
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2answers
278 views

Spin of a particle and spin quantum number [duplicate]

what actually does the spin quantum number of a particle describe about? What it means when we say photon has spin 1, Higgs boson has spin 0, etc..?? What actually does that numerical value explain? I ...
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139 views

Why is it called “annihilation”?

The term "annihilate" literally means "turn into nothing". However, when a particle and antiparticle collide, they clearly do not turn into nothing; they simply transform into different particles. ...
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94 views

A question about how light hits a surface

my question is about how photons travel from a light source and hit an object. When you look at an object being hit by light the whole surface becomes brighter. What i'm trying to understand is why ...
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2answers
98 views

If a particle is a point of high intensity in a quantum field, how can it have charge?

The charge of a fundamental particle is a mysterious but obvious and well-known property of every non-neutral particle. I can understand how, if a particle is an object, or thing, for want of a ...
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1answer
203 views

In Klein-Gordon, why should infinite downwards photon cascades be possible?

Here is a simple point about the standard interpretation of the Klein-Gordon equation that for the life of me I've never been able to understand: Why would the existence of true negative energy ...
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199 views

Does a Photon leave trace in a silicon tracker?

I am having this image from ATLAS Detector. In gray you can see the ATLAS's Si Tracker.In Green you see the Electromagnetic Callorimeter. In red there is the Hadron Callorimeter and in Blue there ...
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196 views

Strong decays of baryons via quark-antiquark pairs

I have the doubly charmed $\Xi_{cc}^{++}$ consisting of ccu quarks. This is meant to decay via strong force, producing a light baryon (cud/uuc/udc etc...) and a quark-antiquark pair along with a ...
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323 views

What happens to string theory if spacetime is doomed?

What is expected to happen with string theory, if physics is reformulated according the lines hinted at by the twistor-uprising business discussed in this question and its answers for example and ...
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1answer
623 views

Why is the majorana particle a fermion?

My knowledge of quantum mechanics is rather limited, but what I always understood was that Bosons have integer spins and Fermions have half-integer spins. My question is very simple: the Majorana ...
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1answer
283 views

What dark matter can AMS currently find (or exclude)?

The rumor mill is running again, this time it's about the AMS experiment (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) that's going to make a major announcement soon. I suppose they are looking for peaks in gamma ...
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264 views

Effective operator in four-fermion interaction

In one book, I have got the following lines which I found myself unable to understand what is effective operator? The paragraph is given below: The weak interaction describes nuclear beta decay, ...
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140 views

What does it mean to gauge a group?

I'm starting to learn about gauge theories and Goldstone bosons. What does it mean for a group to be gauged?
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141 views

Trilinear gauge couplings: Spin

In non-abelian gauge theories self interaction of gauge fields is permitted, allowing coupling such as $WWZ$ (i.e. $Z$-boson decaying to $W^+W^-$) or ggg (i.e. gluon splitting into two new gluons). ...
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156 views

Understanding how mass spectroscopy works

Let me start by saying that I've posted this question here as well. I've posted it here because I think the questions I've asked involve the physics of molecules. So I’m trying to get a deeper ...
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227 views

Muon production in particle accelerator

PAMELA is a particle accelerator which have two concentric rings, protons are accelerated in the inside ring. At ISIS muons are produced when a 800 MeV proton beam collides with a graphite ...
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Pareto efficiency and Standard Model parameters

Pareto Efficiency is a well understood concept in economics, which basically is a condition where no one actor could be made better off without some one being made worse off. This condition allows ...
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6answers
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What would happen if Large Hadron Collider would collide electrons?

After some reading about the Large Hadron Collider and it's very impressive instruments to detect and investigate the collision results, there is a remaining question. What would happen if the ...
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252 views

What is the importance of the Higgs-strahlung process in the Higgs search?

I would particularly like to know why this process is considered the main search mode for Tevatron but useless for search at LHC.
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Calculating lifetime of a pi meson via Heisenberg uncertainty relationship?

This is a problem from my textbook: "A proton or neutron sometimes 'violates' conservation of energy by emitting and then reabsorbing a pi meson, which has a mass 135MeV/$c^2$. This is possible as ...
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1answer
170 views

What are the problems in quark-gluon plasma? [closed]

Someone (T.D.Lee?) said that quark-gluon plasma would (after 1980?) be very important to understand high-energy physics experiments. I read some description of this new state in wikipedia ...
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732 views

Does photon have size measurement because of its particle nature

Does photon have size measurement because of its particle nature like electron's 3.86*10^-13m etc..
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247 views

How is the size of the particles is determined?

What is the size of atomic and subatomic particles, like proton, neutron, photon etc? Is it defined based on some quantum characterics as de Broglie wavelength or Compton wavelength?
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299 views

Trace of stress tensor vanishes ==> Weyl invariant

You often see in textbooks the statement that ${T^\mu}_\mu = 0$ implies Weyl invariance or conformal invariance. The proof goes like $\delta S \sim \int \sqrt{g} T^{\mu\nu} \delta g_{\mu\nu} \sim ...
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470 views

About defining “baryons” and “mesons”

I want to understand the proof of the claims (of the construction as well as of its uniqueness) of gauge singlet states given around equation 2.13 (page 10) of this paper. Also does the listing of ...
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59 views

What exactly is the spin of a particle? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is spin as it relates to subatomic particles? I'm having a hard time grasping the concept of spin, my textbook describes it very vaguely: Stable matter contains ...
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240 views

Compton Scattering

Compton Scattering essentially states that when a photon of a given wavelength hits an electron the energy level of the electron changes and the photon has its wavelength changed. This seems to be ...
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535 views

Graviton and photons interaction

If one believes in the theory of gravitons then by viewing a black hole you see gravitons affect photons. This in turn leads to the conclusion that force carrier's mass equivalences allow them to be ...
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148 views

How is the hierarchy problem consistent with the decoupling theorem?

One the one hand we have the hierarchy problem in it's various forms, in my understanding in it's most serious form one could state it as the observation that if there is a heavy mass scale M in ...
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Chirality when moving around legs in Feynman diagrams

Assuming one has the following term in a Lagrangian: $$ g (\overline{A_R} B_L)(\overline{C_R}D_L) $$ where A,B,C,D correspond to spin 1/2 Dirac particles and the subscripts $R$ and $L$ denote left- ...
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1answer
205 views

Why don't alpha particles have magnetic moments?

As I understand, particles such as the neutron, whilst having no external charge still possess a magnetic moment due to the underlying charges of its components. By that logic why does the alpha ...
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1answer
73 views

Single electron non-perturbing detector

I am designing an experiment where I need to trigger the release of an electron by a radioactive source (Sr-90). The easy way to do it is to use a thin scintillator right after the source collimator. ...
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345 views

Why do hot objects prefer to emit photons over electrons ? Is there electron-positron annihilation?

Why do hot objects prefer to emit photons over electrons ? Is there electron-positron annihilation ? If so , why ? Im confused by this.
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2answers
246 views

How much energy is carried away by neutrinos in matter-antimatter annihilation?

Some people say that neutrinos carry away most of the energy, some others say just a fraction. So what is the truth ? what is the percentage of energy lost due to neutrinos ?
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84 views

Optimal methods for mapping out molecules, atoms and nuclei and their energy levels?

I'm wondering if it would be possible to map out all the different types of molecules, atoms and nuclei and their energy levels on one page (even if in a generalised way)? But perhaps I'm referring to ...
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49 views

Question about linacs

Why are the electrodes of a linac connected to an alternating voltage? Within an electrode the electron moves with a constant speed, and once it is outside of the electrode it accelerates uniformly, ...
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193 views

Explosion of a Neutron Bomb

Watching "The Dark Knight Rises", Bane announces halfway into the movie at the stadium that what they have is a neutron bomb. But then at the end of the movie there is an actual nuclear explosion ...
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1answer
141 views

What is the first appearance of the MV (McLerran-Venugopalan) initial condition?

First a quick introduction for the unfamiliar: in saturation physics (my research field), a lot of theoretical work centers on the BK (Balitsky-Kovchegov) equation, which is a differential equation ...
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928 views

Is all matter made of virtual particles?

This article in New Scientist says that all matter is actually virtual particles popping in and out of existence and nothing more. is this correct?
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237 views

Trying to understand “recursion at the lowest level of matter”

I'm reading the book Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid and on Chapter V, Hofstadter talks about different examples of recursive structures and processes. By page 142 of the 20th anniversary ...
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1answer
151 views

Is the idea of dividing the universe into particles anything more than an untrue convenience? [closed]

In theory, we speak of a particle as having properties. In reality, the measurement of any property is just an interaction between the target to be measured, and the measuring apparatus, where the ...
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123 views

Is there something like Hawking radiation that makes protons emit component quarks?

If Hawking radiation can escape from black holes, could quarks perhaps become separated from protons despite it being "impossible" for that to happen?
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278 views

“Hard wall”/ “soft wall”

I have encountered those terms in various places. As I understand it, "soft wall" can correspond to a smooth cutoff of some spacetime, while "hard wall" can be a sharp one, which can be described in ...
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Why does $\mathcal L = -\frac14 F^{\mu\nu} F_{\mu\nu}$ imply Photons are massless?

The Lagrangian $\mathcal L = -\frac14 F^{\mu\nu} F_{\mu\nu}$ with $F_{\mu\nu} = \partial_\mu A_\nu - \partial_\nu A_\mu$ results in the four-potential's equation of motion $$ \underbrace{\partial^\mu ...
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1answer
84 views

Neutrino mass as counted in Dark Matter

If I try to add up neutrino masses (let's assume 1 eV rest mass equivalent each) to count as DM, do I use the rest mass or relativistic mass?
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1answer
277 views

Labelling representations using isospin and hypercharge

Can someone explain how isospin and hypercharge can be used to label representations? What is the meaning of the term singlet, doublet etc in this context? In particular how can I use it to label ...
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293 views

Do particle pairs avoid each other? Please end my musings

Can you explain what happens when a particle and its antiparticle are created. Do they whiz away from each other at the speed of light or what? I suppose that they don't because otherwise they would ...
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1answer
164 views

What are “hidden valley sectors”?

In this end of the year article, Prof. Strassler mentioned that hidden valley sectors could lead to some still open loopholes concerning the experimental discovery of supersymmetry and other BSM ...
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1answer
123 views

Why are some extra dimension theories known as strongly coupled and others as weakly coupled?

I was looking at pdf file of the presentation of a conference talk. The speaker discusses two types of "mechanisms" for stabilizing the weak scale and calls them "weakly coupled" and "strongly ...
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324 views

The building blocks of energy

I have a couple of related questions that have been bothering me for a while. They might sound unscientific, but here is goes: What are the building blocks of energy? What does energy consist of? Is ...