Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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Do inelastic or elastic collisions have any effect on a large bodies movement (like the Earth)

Recently read a question regarding the temperature of the CMB & one of the comments got me thinking... From what I understand, collisions between subatomic particles and objects out in ...
2
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2answers
89 views

Gravity vs. Electromagnetism Scenario

Imagine a two dimensional world where there are only two electrons. They are set right beside each other. Of course, immediately they will start to separate, being repelled. My question is, as they ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Does the Breit Wigner formula apply to intermediate virtual particles?

Breit Wigner Formula describes the cross section for interactions that proceed dominantly via a intermediate particle (O*) A+B → O* → C + D: $$σ = \frac{2\Pi}{k^{2}}\frac{Γ_{i}Γ_{f}}{(E-E_{o})^{2} + ...
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1answer
43 views

Anything special about the internal structure of Carbon-12?

In trying to understand the various structures carbon forms, I'm wondering what, if anything, is so special about having 6 neutrons and 6 protons in the nucleus. I'm aware there are permutations ...
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0answers
27 views

Why are the particles called irreps of Poincare group? [duplicate]

Why are particle excitations called irreducible representation of the Poincare group? It will be very helpful if someone can illustrate with one concrete example of a particle.
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1answer
45 views

What happens when an anti-proton and an electron collide with each other?

The vice versa case is also of interest (proton and positron). Are both processes actually symmetrical?
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1answer
62 views

Is possible to create water? [on hold]

Theoretically is relatively easy to create water, because it is formed by only the hydrogen and one oxygen molecules. I know that the oxygen and hydrogen is highly flammable, and to union the ...
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2answers
42 views

What is the property of neutrino? [on hold]

If mass of a particle is due to Higgs boson, spin is due to Z boson and translational energy is due to photons, what exactly is the innate property of a neutrino? If none exist, is neutrino truly a ...
2
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1answer
27 views

Counting higher-order corrections in “ABC theory”

I am trying to understand how to enumerate higher-order Feynman diagrams. In his book on Elementary Particle Physics, Griffiths considers a simple "ABC toy theory" which has: three (scalar, ...
2
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4answers
103 views

Orbital angular momentum of nucleus?

For nuclei, I know that it is the $J^{\pi}$ that is usually measured/calculated, which is the spin-parity. I don't see "orbital angular momentum" of a nucleus very often. Now my notion of spin vs. ...
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0answers
64 views

Is there scientific proof of god? [on hold]

Recently I've been having a discussion on whether there is scientific/mathematics proof for the existence of god. -- A probability model was put forward of which seems to have some errors/flaws in ...
0
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2answers
20 views

How can the uncertainty principle be used to deduce range of a force from properties of the force carrier?

Question: How can the uncertainty principle be used to deduce range of a force from properties of the force carrier? My thoughts? Not too sure how this can be done and would like some advice. ...
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1answer
27 views

What is a collider detector [on hold]

I'm trying to understand what a collider detector is essentially. I have looked around the web and most of what I'm reading is way too advanced for me to understand. Would it be possible for someone ...
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1answer
23 views

Why are high energies needed in collision experiments?

Why are high energies needed in collision experiments? I believe it has something to do with the interactions needed between particles to find other particles only happening at high energies? Is this ...
58
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8answers
6k views

Why does space expansion not expand matter?

REFORMULATED: I have looked at the other questions (ie "why does space expansion affect matter") but can't find the answer I am looking for. My question: There is always mention of space expanding ...
0
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1answer
445 views

Why does mass in the universe have no limit in large size, but has a limit in small size?

We found VY Canis Majoris, a star so big it can't even be seen in scaled illustratations with the sun itself. However, we stop at particle physics, or quantum mechanics, i.e. particles, subatomic, ...
2
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1answer
32 views

How would one build an RF cavity?

How does an RF cavity, such as the RF cavities in the LHC, work mechanically and mathematically? How would one build an RF cavity? What equations govern the speed of a charged particle in an RF ...
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3answers
1k views

Why don't protons just bounce off each other in the LHC?

Ok, this might sound like a silly question, but I was wondering, when particles (e.g. protons) are smashed together in the LHC, why do they break up into dozens of other particles, as opposed to just ...
3
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1answer
139 views

Can the Higgs condensate be described in terms of creation operators?

In superconductivity, the BCS condensate can be described in terms of 2 creation operators (the 2 electrons of the pair) acting on the vacuum. I'm wondering whether a similar description can be given ...
2
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1answer
24 views

Why performing axial symmetry, results in the same masses for pion and sigma mesons?

Under axial transformations, $\sigma$ and $\pi$ are rotated into each other: $\vec{\pi} \rightarrow \vec{\pi}+ \vec{\theta} \sigma $, $\sigma \rightarrow \sigma+ \vec{\theta}.\vec{\pi} $. In ...
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2answers
63 views

Decay of matter

I was watching Stephen Hawking's documentary and in there he explained how he realized why black holes eventually disintegrate: ...
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0answers
19 views

SUSY without gaugino [closed]

In Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with $R$-parity, gauginos have Majorana mass. If we use $R$-symmetry instead of $R$-parity, gauginos do not have Majorana mass. But they can acquire ...
4
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1answer
34 views

How is $J^{PC}$ value experimentally determined for new types of particles?

How is $J^{PC}$ value experimentally determined for new types of particles? For example, this paper says ... Angular correlations in B+→X(3872)K+ decays, with X(3872)→ρ0J/ψ, ρ0→π+π− and J/ψ→μ+μ−, ...
3
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2answers
519 views

What experiment(s) have or can refute the existence of an electron-particle “system” over the separate existence of a neutron within itself?

This question actually came about from a discussion of another question posed here The neutron is known to be comprised of an electron and a proton, and there are observations that the neutron can be ...
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5answers
1k views

How can a point-particle have properties?

I have trouble imagining how two point-particles can have different properties. And how can finite mass, and finite information (ie spin, electric charge etc.) be stored in 0 volume? Not only that, ...
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3answers
1k views

Why is the (free) neutron lifetime so long?

A neutron outside the nucleus lives for about 15 minutes and decays mainly through weak decays (beta decay). Many other weakly decaying particles decay with lifetimes between $10^{-10}$ and $10^{-12}$ ...
2
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4answers
167 views

What is the difference between the Higgs Boson particle and an electron moving through the Higgs field?

I am watching a lecture by Sean Caroll titled "Particles, Fields, and the Future of Physics". I am not a physicist by any means but enjoy the subject in my spare time hoping to understand it. This ...
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2answers
529 views

Deriving Feynman rules from a Lagrangian for vertex factors for “more complicated” interactions

I am trying to derive Feynman rules from a given Lagrangian and I got stuck on some vertex factors. What for example is the vertex factor that corresponds to the four-scalar interaction that is ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Need help with which books I should buy [duplicate]

I need some help with witch books i should read. I would like to study science, physics, quantum physcics, astrophysics and all other kind of physics. Hit me with the best books inside of thoes ...
3
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1answer
100 views

Proton flux model or data at energy range up to 100 keV

I am looking for a model or at best the database of proton fluxes (solar p+) at a energy range of some eV up to 100 keV. I have already found the SOHO database: http://umtof.umd.edu/pm/ But the ...
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0answers
25 views

Gamma matrices in Decay Calculations [closed]

I am trying to calculate the transition amplitude, $\lvert M^2\rvert$, for the process where a top quark (momentum p) decays to a bottom quark (momentum q) and a $W^+$ boson (momentum k). I am ...
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2answers
39 views

Where does the mass of particle that is decaying go?

The particle of a heavy quark (such a s a bottom quark) into either an up or down is an actually change I'm mass (if I know what I'm talking about, which I don't think I do, but that's what this is ...
5
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2answers
230 views

Scalar field divergent mass correction interpretation question (hierarchy problem)

Simple power counting tells you that a scalar field coupled to some fermions at one-loop picks up a correction to the mass of the order $\Lambda^2$. Based on this people say things like "it's natural ...
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1answer
21 views

Apparatus for generating plasma

I'm working on a project which involves superheating nitrogen to a state of plasma. I was considering using my Fusor, but this project has nothing to do with plasma, and I believe that there are way ...
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1answer
82 views

What is the general definition of signal acceptance?

Suppose I have a beyond Standard Model theory and want to test it. I want to test if some experiments, say conduced in LHC, show signals of the theory. In this case, what is "signal acceptance"?
13
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4answers
842 views

Origin of lepton/quark generations?

What theoretical explanations exist for the fact that there are three generations of leptons and quarks? I'm not so much asking why there are exactly 3 generations, but rather what makes electron, ...
5
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1answer
59 views

Why does gg fusion dominate over q qbar annihilation at the LHC?

The cross section of top quark pair production is dominated at the LHC by gluon-gluon fusion, whereas at Tevatron, quark-antiquark annihilation is more prevalent. Why is this? I know the fundamental ...
2
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1answer
74 views

Leptogenesis with singlet neutrinos

(i) The Lagrangian of electroweak model extended with right-chiral singlet neutrinos $N_{iR}$ contains the Yukawa coupling term+ the bare Majorana mass term $$f_{\alpha ...
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0answers
26 views

Regge trajectories for higher spins

I have read that Regge theory did/does predict higher spin meson states, but that at higher spins the data becomes fuzzy for spins greater than 4. Why is this so? In the book "A Brief History of ...
3
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1answer
286 views

Antineutron repelled by gravity?

I was reading an old post, Can gravity be shielded, like electromagnetism?. One of the responses had this comment. There are some experiments trying to measure whether antiprotons ( antimatter) ...
4
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3answers
865 views

Why does positronium decay into 2 photons more often than into 3 photons?

I cannot find the answer to the above question. I know that para-positronium is created with a probability of $25\%$ and decays into 2 photons, while ortho-positronium is created with a probability ...
0
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0answers
14 views

the different settling speed of two solid particles in fluid

In a container full of fluid A, which can be water or oil, I have two solid particles, both of which are of the same material. These two particles are of different size. One is bigger than the other ...
2
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2answers
86 views

Could synchrotron radiation be produced by a gravitational field instead of a magnetic field?

I know that synchrotron radiation is produced when a charged particle is accelerated radially by a magnetic field, but I was wondering if synchrotron radiation could also be produced by an uncharged ...
15
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1answer
4k views

Are all electrons identical?

Why should two sub-atomic (or elementary particle) - say electrons need to have identical static properties - identical mass, identical charge? Why can't they differ between each other by a very ...
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2answers
96 views

Is there a fundamental interaction responsible for quantum entanglement?

Quantum entanglement seems to share information between particles instantaneously, as well as characteristics of these particles through changes that occur in each particle. If forces transfer energy ...
2
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1answer
73 views

Why can't a high intensity beam be injected into the LHC when the machine is empty

Watching this YouTube video about the LHC at around 3 minutes and 50 seconds into the video the narrator says... For machine protection reasons we are not allowed to inject a high intensity beam ...
1
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1answer
33 views

Direct and indirect CP violation

Experimentally, what is the difference between direct and indirect CP violation? An example of indirect CP violation is: $$ \Gamma(\overline{B}^0 \rightarrow B^0) \neq \Gamma(B^0 \rightarrow ...
5
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1answer
52 views

Is the $\nu_e$ massive?

Neutrino oscillations imply that the $\nu_\tau$ is more massive than the $\nu_\mu$, and the $\nu_\mu$ is more massive than the $\nu_e$, so it's inferred that the $\nu_\mu$ and $\nu_\tau$ have mass. ...
2
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1answer
54 views

Order of Feynman diagrams for electroweak processes?

I want to compare two Feynman diagrams and be able to say which one describes a process that is more likely to happen. As far as I understand, this is done by considering the order of the diagram. ...
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1answer
67 views

Do subatomic particles have dimensions?

We know atoms are mostly "made" out of empty space, so the nucleus and all the subatomic particle are very small in compared to the magnitude of the atoms. We also know that atoms are incredibly ...