1
vote
1answer
96 views

What kind of a particle has this mass?

I have a particle that has a mass around $(760\pm10)~MeV/c^2$ but I do not know what kind of particle it is. This links me to some tables that have data on all sorts of subatomic particles but it is ...
5
votes
2answers
145 views

How do collisions of fundamental particles produce different fundamental particles?

When considering fundamental particles as waves in fields, it seems like any collision of two particles of some fundamental type could only create energy within that type's field. Why do we expect ...
2
votes
2answers
88 views

What is the difference between a charged rho meson and a charged pion?

They both seem to have the same quark content: $$\rho^{+} = u\bar{d} = \pi^{+}$$ and $$\rho^{-} = \bar{u}d = \pi^{-}$$ What is different about the two?
1
vote
1answer
71 views

How is a Higgs boson created?

I have read a lot on Higgs bosons, yet I do not fully comprehend how they are created and how they are "flicked off" the Higgs field. I have also had trouble comprehending why a Higgs boson quickly ...
6
votes
2answers
97 views

Deciding what to collide at particle accelerator

Different particle accelerators use different types of collisions. For instance at the LHC they investigated p Pb collisions while its predecessor (LEP), used to collide electrons with proton and at ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

Particles from String theory

I understand that the strings in string theory are posited to be many, many orders of size smaller than say, a quark, electron or any other particle. But if this is so, how does the string "expand" to ...
9
votes
1answer
250 views

Why are there no particles in conformal theories?

In Matt Strassler's recent post (here) he makes the statement that scale invariant (I assume he means conformally invariant, more generally) theories have no particles in them. What's the reason for ...
-4
votes
2answers
257 views

What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?

Look at this here. With respect to the sciences, the atom is obviously not the smallest piece of mass. Apparently, if people have already broken down the atom in to particles smaller than so, why ...
0
votes
0answers
58 views

Preons and 't Hooft condition

If some fundamental particles, like leptons or quarks are composite (e.g.in preonic models), or the same with gauge bosons or the higgs particles. How could it be possible that preons were more ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

What is the $t\bar{t}$ production supposed to bring up

The $t\bar{t}$ production, I've read, that will somehow confirm the QCD and might bring up new physics. Why are we studying $t\bar{t}$ production from $p-p$ collisions at the LHC? What are we trying ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Convolving Parton Distribution Functions

I have the cross-sections as a function of $\sqrt{s}$ for a process with a $u$-quark and $u$-antiquark in the initial state (eg.: $u \bar{u} \to e^- e^+$). I have a standard parton distribution ...
0
votes
2answers
181 views

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere?

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere, when in fact it's not?
1
vote
2answers
178 views

Does the unpredictability in the “micro world” means that everything is if we can look at it close enough imperfect?

Does the unpredictability in the "micro world" means that everything is if we can look at it close enough imperfect? I mean, there is a saying "You will never stand in the same river again" or ...
0
votes
1answer
150 views

Is the idea of dividing the universe into particles anything more than an untrue convenience? [closed]

In theory, we speak of a particle as having properties. In reality, the measurement of any property is just an interaction between the target to be measured, and the measuring apparatus, where the ...
1
vote
3answers
259 views

Do particle pairs avoid each other? Please end my musings

Can you explain what happens when a particle and its antiparticle are created. Do they whiz away from each other at the speed of light or what? I suppose that they don't because otherwise they would ...
8
votes
6answers
857 views

What is the meaning of the word “particle” in particle physics?

I want to use Matt Strassler's definition of the word "particle" as a specific example: Matt Strassler writes: (1) "...all the elementary “particles” (i.e. quanta) of nature are quanta of waves ...
2
votes
1answer
138 views

$sss$ decay and violation of strangeness

Why can the hyperon $\Omega^{-}$ not decay by strong interaction? It seems that strangeness must be violated, but why is it the only way?
1
vote
1answer
432 views

Definition of elementary particle [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why are atoms particles? According to wikipedia an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a particle not known to have substructure. Moreover, I've learned ...
1
vote
1answer
348 views

What was the first discovery of the delta baryon $\Delta^{++}$?

The delta baryons (also called delta resonances) are a family of subatomic hadron particles which have the symbols $\Delta^{++}$, $\Delta^{+}$, $\Delta^{0}$, and $\Delta^{−}$ and electric charges +2, ...
1
vote
2answers
204 views

Why are atoms particles?

The Oxford English Dictionary definition of particle is as follows: "A component of the physical world smaller than the atom." I read an article in NewScientist and it said "...all particles from ...
5
votes
5answers
699 views

The observation of a non-SM resonance at 38 MeV

Was reported here. Of course if this is real it is very exciting. It leads me to the question: given that it took so long to find this resonance at a meager 38 MeV, is it possible that all SUSY ...
4
votes
2answers
259 views

Higgs boson and quasiparticles

Do we know exactly the difference between particles and quasiparticles? Is Higgs boson a particle or a quasiparticle? I ask this because if I understood well, Higgs boson created by a spontaneaous ...
3
votes
0answers
216 views

what interactions would take place between a free proton and a dipolariton?

What interactions can be expected to take place between a free proton and a dipolariton, (a) at high energies and (b) at lower energies? A dipolariton is a bosonic quasi-particle mentioned in a ...
2
votes
2answers
277 views

How the nucleon structure has been identified experimentally?

It is known that nucleons (proton, neutron) are composed of partons (quarks, etc.). How was this identified experimentally? In particular, how it has been identified that nucleons comprise of more ...
17
votes
3answers
1k views

Are elementary particles actually more elementary than quasiparticles?

Quarks and leptons are considered elementary particles, while phonons, holes, and solitons are quasiparticles. In light of emergent phenomena, such as fractionally charged particles in fractional ...
1
vote
1answer
199 views

Stability of neutron [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How come neutrons in a nucleus don't decay? It is known that free neutron decays in 15 minutes on average. Why is it much more stable when "placed" in nuclei? Edit: ...
8
votes
1answer
530 views

why is there no ninth gluon?

A teacher of mine told me once that there were no ninth gluon because such a one should be white and interact infinitely far, and no one has been observed. Is there also a theoretical reason?
0
votes
2answers
181 views

Speed Distribution of The Particles

I want to know the distribution of the particles's speed. The particles what I mean are nucleons and electrons of element. Consume there is 1kg of iron on room temperature and it's shape is sphere. ...
3
votes
3answers
996 views

What is lepton number?

What exactly is a lepton number of a particle? With the charge (eg proton is just 1, not the exact charge), I can understand because it's a physical property, put a particle with charge + next to ...
-2
votes
1answer
227 views

Transition of Electric Charge In Collision Between Proton And Antiproton

I know that $$p+\bar{p}\to 4\pi^++4\pi^-+(\gamma)$$ Before the collision, the sum of absolute electric charge value is $2$. $$\left | +1 \right |+\left | -1 \right |=2$$ After the collision, the ...
11
votes
1answer
3k views

Phase shifts in scattering theory

I have been studying scattering theory in Sakurai's quantum mechanics. The phase shift in scattering theory has been a major conceptual and computational stumbling block for me. How (if at all) does ...
6
votes
3answers
286 views

References on the non-compositeness of the known elementary particles

What paper(s) or theory(s) describe or prove that the elementary particles that we have determined today cannot be made up of smaller more fundamental particles?
4
votes
1answer
946 views

Why does lambda decay violate parity?

When a lambda particle decays into proton and a pion, I am told it does not conserve parity. Why?
2
votes
2answers
4k views

How do alpha and beta particles ionise surrounding particles?

I've been wondering about this question for a while. If you have alpha and beta particles released from a radioactive core, how do they ionise surrounding particles?