Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

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Local number operators in quantum field theory

Redhead claims in his paper "More ado about nothing" (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02054660) that number operators associated with different space points (at fixed time) fail to ...
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Does this photograph portray double muon impact with nanogold atoms?

1PHOTO 1: Macro-photograph of an NIH/FDA TEM of a nanogold dark stained biological sample projected onto Silver Halide (AgX) photographic gel paper. On June 10 I questioned if PHOTO 1 ...
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Does yukawa potential of two particles have effect on each other?

Okay,a novice here.Suppose two particle interact with Higgs field.Does The Yukawa potential created by each of them affect each other or the interaction in any way.If so,what is it physical ...
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28 views

Equation for Photon and Electron Propagation [on hold]

What equation accurately describes the movement of a photon? Does this equation also apply to the movement of an electron?
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46 views

Quantum Boltzmann Equation

What is the Quantum Boltzmann equation and what does it describe? I think it describes the propagation of electrons and photons but I am not sure.
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Which cosmological dark matter theory is most compatible with current particle physics?

This occurred to me while I was writing Why hasn't warm dark matter replaced cold dark matter as the standard model of cosmology? but I think this deserves a question of its own. The background ...
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Could Particles Really Spin in the Really Real World? The video in the link says they do [on hold]

In the video bellow the presenter indicates that particles really do spin. He also claims to calculate the energy release from a U 235 fission reaction. Could this be real? ...
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57 views

2 entangled electrons in QFT

In field theory, by quantizing a dirac field, we can obtain a creation operator for a single electron of definite momentum, of definite spin up or down, these respectively are: ...
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3answers
81 views

Why do physicists use LHC?

My question is why are we colliding particles in LHC to produce new ones? And these particles that they sometimes say live for a fraction of a second, how in space they exists then? In space all ...
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1answer
43 views

Fierz identity for Weyl spinors in tensor currents

Using Fierz identity I found that certain four-fermion operator with left $l_i$ and right-chiral $r_i$ Weyl spinors vanish $\bar{l}_1\sigma_{\mu\nu} r_2 \bar{r}_3 \sigma^{\mu\nu} l_4 =$ $ ...
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384 views

Neutrino annihilation and bosons

Would it be theoretically possible for a high energy neutrino and another high energy anti-neutrino to annihilate into a boson? Which boson(s) would be possible theoretically? - one or more photons ? ...
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25 views

Could space itself be made out of particles? [duplicate]

Are there any theories out there that discuss the idea that space itself could be made out of particles?
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84 views

Mathematical model that allows the existence of an infinite number of smallest, but different particles

Does there exist a mathematical formalism (model) in particle physics that assumes the existence of an infinite number of different, yet smallest particles (building blocks)?
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Mathematical formalism to include wave and particle perspectives of light

Does the exist any mathematical formalism (model) describing the behavior of light and incorporating its particle character (divisibility, quantization) and wave character? (i.e. quantized wave model) ...
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79 views

What exactly is a gauge anomaly?

In lots of papers I read about gauge anomalies. For example, avoiding gauge anamolies in the MSSM is the reason for introducing an extra Higgs doublet. Gauge anamolies in the Standard Model are ...
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1answer
38 views

Stellar remnants in a state of matter denser than neutron-degenerate

When discussing the stellar life cycle, it's often stated that if the collapsing core of a star is bigger than the mass limit for a stable neutron star, it must collapse to a black hole. However, ...
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Chirality of Weyl Semimetal

For Weyl semimetal, the effective Hamiltonian reads: $$H=E_0 \mathbb{1} + v_0 \cdot \mathrm{q} \mathbb{1}+\sum_{i=1}^{3} \mathrm{v}_i \cdot \mathrm{q} \sigma_i$$ Why is the chirality given by ...
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6answers
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If there were fundamental forces weaker than gravity, would we know about it?

We know that gravity is a very weak force compared to electromagnetic forces and the nuclear forces. We know about the other forces because they're necessary to explain atoms, and we can detect ...
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2answers
115 views

Where does the electron get its high magnetic moment from?

I have always found the concept of spin a little weird. I had read somewhere that for the charge or size of electrons, their magnetic field is very high. In order to produce such fields, they must be ...
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Reason for big bang [duplicate]

can an elementary particle compress or condense or collapse (for both cases: if particle represents primordial singularity where all fundamental forces are unified, and if elementary particle is just ...
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365 views

Physical reason for annihilation? [duplicate]

What is the fundamental reason as to why matter and antimatter annihilate? Is it because both particles and antiparticles are excitations of quantum fields, and the annihilation process corresponds ...
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0answers
35 views

What would the properties of a particle be that would allow light to orbit it? [duplicate]

What would the properties of a particle be that would allow light to orbit it? Light travels fast. Really fast. Almost to the point where we consider that it's instantaneous, and moves only in a ...
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3answers
152 views

What is the difference between “accelerating a particle to light speed” and “turning on a flashlight”?

According to how we understand the universe it would take an infinite amount of energy to accelerate the ambiguous "particle" to light speed. Yet there are all kinds of reactions that cause light, ...
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Why doesn't matter pass right through other matter if atoms are 99.999% empty space?

The ghostly passage of one body through another is obviously out of the question if the continuum assumption were valid, but we know that at the micro, nano, pico levels (and beyond) this is not even ...
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2answers
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Does the Higgs boson give mass to ALL other particles? [duplicate]

The Higgs Field gave mass to other particles via spontaneous symmetry breaking; does this mean it gives mass to all particles that have mass - such as neutrinos, quarks or weak bosons and strong ...
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1answer
32 views

Regarding luminosity monitor of particle collider

I am sorry if my question is completely wrong or foolish I would feel glad to be corrected On the wiki page for Bhabha Scattering, it is mentioned that it is used as luminosity monitor in many ...
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3answers
403 views

When does a particle go through the Higgs Field?

This is a short and simple question... I have been reading my book on particle physics and quantum physics when I had thought of a question that it failed to answer: "Does a particle enter/interact ...
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Is there still mystery about spin crisis?

The gluon is a vector boson; like the photon, it has a spin of 1. If this is true and if we know the spin of protons and neutrons then why the news SPIN COMES FROM GLUONS? is telling that, we ...
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Units and missing constants in quintessence expressions?

In cosmology, quintessence is an alternative to the cosmological constant. In this approach (described here), we consider a scalar field $\phi$ and its self-interacting potential $V\left(\phi\right)$ ...
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What is the phase space for outgoing photons?

For a scattering process for which $n$ fermions are scattered, (by some conventions) the cross section acquires a phase space factor of: $$d\sigma \sim \prod_{i=1}^n\frac{d^3p_i}{(2\pi)^3 2E_i}$$ ...
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Why is the spectrum of the $\beta$-decay continuous?

the spectrum of the Gamma and Alpha decays are both discrete, i.e. the $\alpha$-particles and the $\gamma$-rays take on only discrete values when emitted from a decaying nucleus. Why is it then, that ...
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Pions as a superposition of quark states

in Isospin space there are two fundamental states called up and down quarks, which satisfy the following eigenvalue equations: $I u = (1/2) u$, $I d = (1/2) d$ and $I_3 u = (1/2) u, I_3 d = (-1/2) ...
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77 views

The ridge at LHC

One of the results obtained by LHC is the following diagram for p-Pb collisions: I would like to understand what is actually depicted in the figure, what should we expect based on theoretical ...
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Insulators (also called Dielectrics) which cannot conduct Electricity

How Dielectrics as an Insulating materials transmit electric effect without Conducting Electricity ? How its Possible ??
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Why are interactions always mediated via bosons (as opposed to fermions)? [duplicate]

Weak, Strong and electromagnetic force are mediated via bosons. I've come across the Walecka-model where the exchange particles are $\sigma$ and $\omega$ mesons; bosons again. why are interactions ...
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60 views

What is different in representation?

I'm sorry if this is somewhat a dumb question. First: "Representation theory is a branch of mathematics that studies abstract algebraic structures by representing their elements as linear ...
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For what rare events was the LHC built?

I understand that for low cross-section events a very high luminosity is necessary in order to obtain enough data to produce meaningful statistics. That is why the LHC was built. But which are these ...
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Explosive energy in a container [closed]

What happens when the explosive energy of a grenade or a bomb is contained in a container, if you will, and no energy can be released through the container in the form of heat or sound etc...? Just ...
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1answer
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Decuplet baryon resonances

Are all baryons from decuplet resonances?? Because all resonances decay by strong interaction; but omega minus baryon can't decay via strong, because any other bound state with strangeness -3 exists. ...
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1answer
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Is electrons ability to produce mechanical motion considered the only reason for it to be material particle?

"Cathode rays (streams of electrons) produce mechanical motion of a small paddle wheel placed in their path indicating that they are material particles."$_1$ Isn't this statement wrong? Assuming ...
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1answer
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Will we need to update Electrodynamics?

A contradiction to the Electrodynamics by the experiment. The author has said that, accordning to the experiment, photon is no more gauge invariant? Why is that? An important thing is that Although ...
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What does the size of an object have to do with it's color?

Stephen Hawking mentions in his book "A Brief History of Time' that quarks are much smaller than the wavelength of visible light so they do not have any color in the normal sense. What exactly does ...
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Does a hydrogen atom today have same mass as a hydrogen atom in the future?

Does an atom of hydrogen today have the same rest mass energy as an atom of hydrogen a billion years in the future? Standard cosmology seems to tacitly make this assumption. But surely one can only ...
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Particle Collision with Static System

I have a system of particles with equal distance with each other and another at random positions which is moving with time. What I want to know is : The method by which I can reduce the number of ...
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Physical interpretation of scalar tadpole loops

In Feynman diagrams, fermionic loops are drawn like this: While scalar loops are drawn as tadpoles: I assume the difference comes from the scalar not having an anti-particle. But how should one ...
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“Weakness” of gravitational force

I often hear that gravitational force is much "weaker" than electroweak and strong forces. But how can you compare the strength of interactions without the parameters like mass, charge on which it ...
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1answer
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Would a high energy bottom quark 'decay' to a top quark?

The reason for the long life time of $B$-hadrons is that the CKM element $|V_{tb}| > 0.999$, meaning that the preferred decay of the $b$-quark is to a $t$-quark (and vice versa). However because ...
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10 views

in an organic semiconductor, what is the average distance travelled by an exciton?

In an organic semiconductor, what is the average distance travelled by an exciton up to recombination? How is this value related to the morfology / structure of the organic semiconductor?
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1answer
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Different cross section for W and Z boson

At hadron colliders the cross section for W production is about ten times larger than the production cross section for Z bosons (e.g. Figure 2 in this review article). I guess the dominant ...
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Difference in decay for muon and anti muon

In a couple weeks, I will conduct a lab experiment where I measure the lifetime of the muons from the secondary cosmic radiation. For that, we have two detectors above each other, one will give a ...