Optics is the study of light, and its interaction with matter. It includes topics such as imaging systems, fiber optics, lasers, quantum optics, and more.

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Confocal Microscopy

In the context of Confocal Microscopy literature state, "spatial rejection of out of phase light".Is that mean only light which is pass through the pinhole is used and the rest is blocked ?
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What causes blurriness in an optical system?

The way I understand the purpose of a typical optical system is that it creates a one to one mapping between each possible incident ray and a point on a sensor plane. This is like a mathematical ...
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352 views

How to produce a loss-free combination of two “identical” beams?

This is for anyone with experience in optics/imaging/photography as well as anyone who likes to puzzle over tricky physics problems. As the title suggests, this is about combining two (for all ...
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2k views

Newton's rings experiment

I have performed experiments in my college laboratory on Newton's rings to find radius the of curvature of the convex lens used. I always get a dark center. Is it possible to get a bright center? If ...
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197 views

Why does the colour of a thing change when under huge magnification?

For instance, this image: shows human eyelashes close up. The lashes look green, in fact the whole surface area has a strange tint of green Why is this?
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193 views

Is it possible to focus the sun in such way?

Imagine the sliding part of the mirror is controlled by computer and opens on intervals. Is it possible to increase the power of the beam by making it bounce between the mirrors thus going through ...
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605 views

Diffraction by a lens

The fraunhoffer treatment of circular apertures yields a diffraction pattern of circles, with the first minimum (dark ring) at an angular radius of $\theta$ where $\sin(\theta)=1.22\lambda/b$, where $...
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relation between Schrodinger equation and wave equation [duplicate]

I have always been confused by the relationship between the Schrödinger equation and the wave equation. $$ i\hbar \frac{\partial \psi}{\partial t} = - \frac{\hbar^2}{2m} \nabla^2+ U \psi \hspace{0....
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121 views

Microscopic explanation of optical activity

The origin of linear birefringence in crystal can be easily explained by the symmetry of the crystal. However, it seems it is hard to be applied in circular birefringence (i.e. optical activity), ...
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48 views

Which microscopy technique is for wet condition? [closed]

I am searching for a microscopy technique in wet conditions. It must be possible to see through the specimen. ESEM is good but can't see through. TEM needs high vacuum which will boil away water. The ...
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384 views

Why would the reflection of a lamp by a bowl look like a heart?

I have this bowl roughly the shape of a circular truncated cone, and the lamp shines on the bowl at an angle. The reflected lamp light hit the bottom of the bowl and created a light ring that looks ...
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560 views

Diffraction/Bragg's law : how does $2\theta$ come about?

I'm trying to get my head around a problem (I should have checked whether I had the answer in class, the exams are coming up now and I don't know if I'll get a lecturer response over the holidays) I ...
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2k views

Didn't Newton's Corpuscular theory fail to explain reflection?

In 1637 Descartes gave the corpuscular model of light and derived Snell's law. This Corpuscular model of light was further developed by Isaac Newton in his famous book entitled OPTICKS and because of ...
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Fresnel distance and Geometrical limit

I read about the geometrical limit of wave theory. The source from where I read had a slightly different explanation to provide than here(The more rigorous answer is too complicated for me to ...
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1answer
702 views

Diffracton at the edges of an opaque object?

To understand the phenomenon of diffraction as an interference effects of several dipole oscillators (like in case of several symmetrical, not sawtooth, scratches in a diffraction grating), we ...
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31 views

Resource about Supercontinuum Generation in Fibers

I would like to consult a nice reference that explains the theoretical background of SC generation in optical fibers in detail but more or less self-contained. I would also like to have your opinions ...
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2answers
95 views

What gives an object its colour?

My understanding of colour is that atoms in a particular object will absorb certain wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, and the scattered wavelengths give the object its colour. The absorbed ...
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3answers
221 views

How to smooth the spectrum of a light source?

Could somebody please tell me if there's a reasonably cheap substance or device can I use to smooth the spectrum of a light source? For example, if the spectrum has spikes as in the blue graph below, ...
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1answer
96 views

Frequency dependence of permittivity — why not monotonic?

I naively thought that most materials were transparent to radiation of frequencies above their plasma frequency, and opaque to radiation below it. The most intuitive (and analyzed lightly in Griffiths'...
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48 views

Relativistic aberration - half-sky radius

With relativistic aberration, a sky full of stars gets concentrated in the direction of motion. As a rough measure of the degree of concentration, one could use the radius of a small circle, centered ...
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404 views

How to be sure that a He-Ne laser light is monochromatic

How can I be sure that the emission of a He-Ne laser contains only one single mode of laser cavity? The only thing that I know is that if I use a diffraction grating and the light isn't monochromatic,...
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49 views

Measuring spin direction by means of coherent light?

Let us assume that we have the ferromagnetic surface where all atoms have the same direction of spins. And we can interact with the single atom in such lattice. Is it possible to measure the ...
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404 views

Is optical-illusion responsible for Loch Ness monster? [closed]

When you look out at the white-caps on a wind-swept lake, you can see a dark, undulating pattern under the crests of the white-caps. Could this shadow-like area explain the sightings? Revised, see ...
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417 views

Why does a light wave invert at a boundary with greater index of refraction?

Is there a reason why a EM wave reflects invertedly when it meets a boundary point with a greater index of refraction. In the case of ropes, if remember correctly, the reason why it inverts is to ...
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209 views

Third order optical mixing

It's pretty straight-forward to visualise second-order non-linear optical mixing processes in which two waves of frequencies $\omega_{1}$ and $\omega_{2}$ mix up to generate new waves of different ...
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100 views

Boundary Condition for Generating Evanescent Waves

I'm reading through Novotny and Hecht's book on Nano-Optics (Principles of Nano-Optics), and I've come across a subtlety in the boundary conditions for evanescent wave generation (via total internal ...
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484 views

Fresnel Zones-How are they Formed?

How are Fresnel Zones formed? What phenomena of light allow ellipsoid areas to be in phase? I've tried reading articles, but they more or less introduce me to characteristics of light, and then tell ...
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1k views

The Goos Hanchen shift mechanism

When the light is totally reflected in the interface between dense and less-dense medium, we know that the reflected beam will shift a little. Currently I have known the reflection coef r, will be a ...
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Designing a Handheld Optical Communication Device

I'm in a group trying to design an underwater optical communication system for a capstone project. For this system we are planning on using multiple high powered LEDs passing through a lens system, ...
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867 views

A difference between Plane Wave and Collimated?

Collimation is clearly in reference to ray($\vec{k}_{xy}$ vector) orientation unlike waterfront continuity( $\phi_{xy}$ phase shift) described by plane-wave. Not to say that one is not directly ...
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2answers
183 views

What is the transmittance function of a photo filter?

The effect of some photo filters can be summarized in transmission curves such as this one: I do not understand which physical value is modified by the value labeled as "Diffuse Density" in the ...
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1answer
395 views

Diffraction at apertures with arbitrary angle to wavefront

Every physics book I know explains diffraction (e.g. at slits, gratings and circular apertures) in a way which assumes that the light wave impinges perpendicularly on the aperture. Would there be any ...
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1answer
191 views

Ring Resonators

If optical field will propagate into the following ring resonator. Optical field will propagate into the ring and propagate to the coupling region. I didn't get where and how the interference will ...
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348 views

Microscopy types and techniques? [closed]

I didn't get the basic difference in between the different types of microscopy. for example there are several different microscopy techniques are available such as Bright field, Dark field, Confocal, ...
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118 views

Source of beating phenomena of a Michelson interferometer?

I was discussing the reason why we see beating from a Michelson interferometer, and one of my friend said it 's because the light have different frequencies, therefore, they would be out of phase. ...
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What is the requirements from an optical lab in terms of darkness

I am characterizing an optical lab and would like to know therefore what are the requirement from a standard optical lab in terms of ambient luminescence. In other words how dark should an optical lab ...
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1k views

Polarized sunglasses: should the axes in both lenses be parallel?

See the pictures below. A pair of sunglasses I recently purchased has the polarization axis in one lens offset about 20 degrees (by eyeball estimation) from the other. I don't have much experience ...
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Are coherent states of light 'classical' or 'quantum'?

Coherent states of light, defined as $$|\alpha\rangle=e^{-\frac{|\alpha|^2}{2}}\sum_{n=0}^\infty \frac{\alpha^n}{\sqrt{n!}}|n\rangle $$ for a given complex number $\alpha$ and where $|n\rangle$ is a ...
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352 views

Difference in perception of unpolarized and polarized light

What is the difference in perception of polarized light and unpolarized light? What difference does polarized light cause to our eyes?
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103 views

Is it possible to build an optical system that increases the perceived surface brightness?

So is it possbile to build a system from lenses and mirrors that can make faint gas nebulas brighter or can be used as nightvision? If you increase the size of the aperture of a telescope it will ...
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2answers
686 views

Diffraction Grating Spectrometry Question [closed]

Yes, this is a homework question, but I've already failed to solve it enough times that the online system hosting it isn't going to give me any marks, so I figure it's a good time to stop hitting the ...
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3answers
2k views

Exciting Surface Plasmon-Polaritons with Grating Coupling

I'm very new the topic of SPPs and have been trying to understand this particular method of exciting surface plasmons using a 1D periodic grating of grooves, with distance $a$ between each groove. If ...
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Optics & Law of Cosines

I'm supposed to use law of cosines on $S_1S_2P$ in the following diagram that relates to a lens: To arrive at the following equation: $$ \frac{r_2}{r_1} = [1 - 2(\frac{a}{r_1})sin(\theta) + (\frac{...
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2answers
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About partially polarized light and the degree of polariztion

When I was taking Optics course, I found there were several questions about polarization of light. I use the textbook of Hecht. It seems that the definition of degree of polarization may be not so ...
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1answer
592 views

Image formed in a compound light microscope

I am trying to understand whether the image formed in a compound light microscope is at infinity or not. I get conflicting answers everywhere I look.
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1answer
64 views

Determining distance from object in concave lens [closed]

so I was studying for my Yr11 Physics test tomorrow and I came across a question that I got the wrong answer on, all of my friends are getting the same answer. Question: You wish to project the image ...
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2answers
509 views

Fully destructive interference

I'm aware that this is somewhat of a frequently asked question (not only here), and i've dug through respective answer for a few hours before i decided to ask here. None of those answers helped me ...
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1answer
837 views

What gives substances their color?

As far as i know (i may be wrong!), substances appear to have a definite color because they reflect/ transmit all the light rays of the given color, and absorb all the lights rays of the remaining ...
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2answers
164 views

Why is there no dark band below a rainbow?

I've read articles about Descartes' theory of the rainbow and I can understand why there is a dark band of about 8 degrees (Alexander's band) between the primary and secondary bows: for all the water ...
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1answer
120 views

Michelson interferogram white light pattern symmetry

Why is the white light of the interferogram produced by using Michelson Interferometer necessarily symmetric? This is really hard to think.