Optics is the study of light, and its interaction with matter. It includes topics such as imaging systems, fiber optics, lasers, quantum optics, and more.

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Total internal reflection problem — could the textbook be wrong?

This regards the following problem: A ray of light is traveling in glass and strikes a glass/liquid interface. The angle of incidence is $58.0^\circ$ and the index of refraction of the glass is $n = ...
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125 views

Is the plane wave model always valid in reflection and transmission?

my question is related to another one I asked, but I foolishly made that question about several things (experiment, computation, theory) at once so it was confused. I was talking to my boss about ...
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5k views

Refractive Index formula for denser to rarer medium

I learnt that the formula for refractive index when light travels from rarer to denser medium is $$\frac{\sin i }{ \sin r}$$ where $i =$ angle of incidence, $r =$ angle of refraction. Is the same ...
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72 views

Photovoltaic IV data

I am looking for any available measured solar-cell datasets (Voltage/Current) especially for organic photovoltaic cells for the testing of a software unfortunately I am unable to get the measured ...
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161 views

What really is reflection? [duplicate]

What really is reflection? Is it just the reemission of EMR? I asked my teacher, he said in quantum sense, it is true. But when I read something about emissivity in Stefan Boltzmann's equation, it ...
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382 views

Can you replace the backlight of a thin film transistor (TFT) with a mirror?

I basically know how TFT' displays work. They have on both sides a polarizing foil, in 90 degrees with the crystals in the middle modifying which light particles should pass through or not. The light ...
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591 views

Optics Brewster's Angle Reflection Intensity

An incident unpolarised light beam of intensity $I_{0}$ strikes glass plate B at Brewster's Angle. The reflected light travels vertically and strikes a second glass plate A, again at Brewster's Angle. ...
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139 views

Characteristic quantities in Fiber optics

I'm having trouble finding typical quantities in fiber optic communication. In particular, what kind of powers are generally used (or what is the minimum that fiber optics receivers can detect ...
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47 views

What type of interferometry set up do I need to image a small structure at a distance?

Please forgive me, optics isn't my forte. I'm trying to work out how to image the surface structure of an object at a distance. Considerations are: Monochromatic light- it must be imaged in the ...
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282 views

Beam power and electric field after a beam splitter

Consider a beam with power $P_1$ and electric field amplitude $E_{01}$. It is sent through a 50/50 beam splitter that produces beams with power $P_2=P_3=P_1/2$. What are the electric field amplitudes ...
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84 views

Can alimentary packaging film be used to make a Fabry-Perot interferometer?

An alimentary packaging film consists on a thin plastic layer. If we put two of this films one on the other, could this acts as a Fabry-Perot interferometer? (I don't have the appropriate material at ...
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433 views

Reflection between two mirrors?

If I put my hand between two perfectly aligned mirrors and then remove it will the images continue to reflect for a few nanoseconds? If yes then will the images be of a combination of the front and ...
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747 views

Finding out the minimum deviation angle [duplicate]

Let a light incident on a prisom at right angle. I want to determine the minimum deviation angle. I know a relation $$ \frac{\cos i_1}{\cos r_1} = \frac{\sin i_1}{\sin r_1}$$ and minimum angle ...
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124 views

Holographic Image

In a holography set-up, as shown in the figure below, Illumination beam and reference beam both are in phase. The interference pattern generated at the detector contains the whole information about ...
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94 views

Temperature-induced wavelength shift of optical coatings?

Optical coatings designed for reflection or anti-reflection are made of many thin layers which will expand when heated. What will the effect be on the wavelengths the coating will reflect when the ...
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956 views

how does the mirror equation works and what lead to using of sign convention?

EVERYTHING HERE IS FOR CONCAVE MIRROR Everywhere I see the derivation of the mirror equation is given by placing an object before the focus and then proving similarity of the triangles to get to the ...
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244 views

Experiment regarding myopic correction by a manipulation of fingers?

Here is a small experiment my tutor once told us for just amusement. It works for myopic people at least, and can be a good check to see if you have myopia. With your naked eye, ("remove the ...
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498 views

How to test cutoff frequency of IR filter on camera?

Modern cell phones seems to come with IR filters on their cameras. I want to do an experiment to figure out what wavelengths these filters allow to pass and which they block. How would I go about ...
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1k views

Explanation of photon reflection [duplicate]

What occurs in atomic scale that cause the photon to be reflected? In other words, what is the reason for photons to change its direction and why material can reflect certain wavelengths and absorb ...
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313 views

Is it possible for a material to shift the frequency of all light reflected off of it by a specific and constant value

Without reducing the energy more than necessary due to the frequency decrease? And if this happens/works, is there an index of such materials and their optic properties?
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110 views

Polarization of light

So for my experimental optics class, I had to create a device that would emit horizontally polarized light such that its intensity is independent of an incoming linearly polarized beam of arbitrary ...
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188 views

Semiclassical description of EM waves reflection from metallic surfaces

Imagine an EM wave impinging on a metal. Fresnel's formulas tell us that no wave can propagate through the metal, or that the transmitted field is an evascent wave with some penetration depth ...
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114 views

Paralel light conditions after passing from a sphere

Is it possible to get such result that light will be parallel after passing from the sphere? what is the total condition for such result if possible? Thanks for answers
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112 views

Intensifying a light source using black body concept

Is it possible to intensify light by initially passing it through an apparatus like a perfectly black body and then through a colloidal solution? What kind of material can be used inside the ...
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1answer
51 views

Full refraction in fibre optics

Well in a problem I had to calculate the maximum amount of "reflections" in a glass fibre optic pipe (index of refraction = 1.3, width of 20 micrometer and length of 1 meter). I am a bit blocked on ...
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1k views

Magnifying factors of multiple lenses (closely packed)

Well the following question I really struggle to find an answer A thin lens creates an image of an object with magnification -3. A second identical lens is positioned very close to the first ...
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113 views

Is there any optical phenomenon can't be explained without magnetic field?

Almost all optical phenomenon can be explained considering a fluctuating electric field. Is there any optical phenomenon which can't be explained without considering two fluctuating fields, electric ...
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118 views

Vibrations after polarization of light

When we polarize a light, do we get electric vibrations, magnetic vibrations or the mixture of both. If both, then how can both electric and magnetic vibrations occur in single plane because ...
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72 views

Understanding a paper: What is the meaning of $b_0$?

I am looking at this paper (Multicoated gratings, J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1981) and I am getting confused around equation 22. I do not completely understand where he comes up with the equation ...
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286 views

Calculating the magnification of an optical microscopy system

I have a microscopy system that is set up as follows : DSLR with a crop factor of 1.6x ( equivalent to magnification, I believe ) An adaptor optic, for attach the DSLR to the microscope, listed as a ...
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5k views

Effective Refractive Index

Can some one please explain in simple words that what is effective refractive index? How it is different from the refractive index? And how we can calculate the effective refractive index?
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459 views

Effect of slits and a lens

We have a screen with two slits (Young style) separated by a distance $d$, one of them receives a planar wave of $600nm$, the other receives a planar wave of $400nm$. Behind the slits there's a screen ...
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559 views

Simple Question: Speed of Electromagnetic Waves in a Medium

If the speed of an electromagnetic wave in a particular medium is such that $v = c$, the speed of light, does this mean that the permeability $\mu = \mu_0$, i.e. that of a vacuum and the index of ...
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109 views

Reflection of a polarised beam

The past days I've been trying to understand how AutoFocus(AF) works on photographic cameras. There is a statement that says AF systems are polarisation sensitive. This means that they can only work ...
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88 views

State emitting from an extended thermal source

This calculation is for a double slit experiment setup which is experiencing a far field radiation from an extended monochromatic thermal source. I assume the source is 1-D and it's length is $b$. ...
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4k views

Apparent and real depth object in water [closed]

Did I get my formula right? Seems like the correct answer is $d_o = 1.33 \times d_i$ but I thought the formula I should use is $d_i = - \frac{n_2}{n_1} d_o$
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410 views

Keep the light beam in a closed room, is it possible? [duplicate]

I mean if I am in a room totally closed to light. If I switch on a torch for a second then switch it off. So will the inside of room be always bright?
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1answer
241 views

Is a holographic recorder able to capture a large full color picture? [closed]

Is it practical to attempt to build a 3D hologram generator that is full color and big enough to recreate a watermelon full size? If so, is real-time control feasible?
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132 views

Trapping EM radiation [duplicate]

Is there a material which can allow light (or any other EM radiation) to pass through from one side as if it is transparent but its other side reflects light like a mirror?
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632 views

How to calculate the height and length of a reflected ray?

I barely know anything about optics, so I could use some help about how to go about solving this problem. If I have a ray of light at a certain height from the optical axis, propagating at an angle, ...
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488 views

Beam waist at extremely long distances

A beam of light of wavelength $\lambda$ and width $W$ needs to be focused at a distance $D$ to a spot not bigger than $w_S$, which stands for 'width of sail'. Now, the diffraction limit says it ...
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138 views

How reflected objects are composed and who is responsible for that?

Please refer to this image. The scene contains an object close to a mirror in the wall and a window, note that the reflected object is receiving more light than the object itself. I read some ...
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486 views

Kiessig fringes

I have come across many papers but still couldn't find the relationship between index of refraction or atomic scattering factors, and reflectivity. My flow of thought goes as follows: Get the ...
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465 views

How big of a lens or parabolic mirror would it take

...to heat a piece of steel so its glowing yellow (1100 C)? Assuming you had a cloudless day at a latitude of, say, San Francisco... Basically I'm wondering if it is possible/feasible to be able to ...
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86 views

Rays in Symmetric Resonator

I'm having some trouble figuring out how to get started on this question: If I have a symmetric resonator with two concave mirrors of radii $R$ separated by a certain distance, after how many round ...
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503 views

E and H fields created by fiber optics?

When an EM wave travels down a conductor, it creates and electric and magnetic field around (H) the wire and normal to (E) the wire. My question is, when light travels down an optical material such ...
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437 views

Why does heterodyne laser Doppler vibrometry require a modulating frequency shift?

On the wikipedia article (and other texts such as Optical Inspections of Microsystems) for laser Doppler vibrometry, it states that a modulating frequency must be added such that the detector can ...
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73 views

Does a FTS work on the same principle as a michelson (amplitude division) interferometer?

As far as I can tell within an Fourier Transform Spectrometer the spectral information is gained from changing the path length along one arm, this sounds very similar to a michelson interferometer but ...
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190 views

Physics of Fireworks

This evening I saw the 4th July classic Fireworks in San Diego, and I was wondering about the most physical picture of what was happening. Does anyone have a good way to explain the detailed physical ...
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1k views

Find the dispersion of the slab?

I've been having trouble with this for a few days and already used up all my tries on the homework for it, but have the final is coming next week. Thus I would like to know how do this, however I ...