23
votes
6answers
6k views

Should I abandon my thought experiment about time?

I'm trying to think about special relativity without "spoiling" it by looking up the answer; I hope someone can offer some insight - or at least tell me I'm wrong. Suppose I have an ordinary clock ...
27
votes
5answers
3k views

What do you really see on a line of clocks as you pass by them at high speed?

According to my understanding of SR, if I travel at 0.8c relative to a line of clocks, I should see the clocks in front of me going 3 times faster than my own, and those behind me going 3 times slower ...
2
votes
3answers
60 views

In terms of physics, does the phrase “time slows down” mean the same thing as “things happen more slowly?”

The common definition of "time" is a type of measurement, like size. But the sentence "size gets bigger" doesn't make any sense. Is "time slows down" an odd phrasing of "events occur more slowly" or ...
2
votes
4answers
105 views

How much could one slow down aging using existing spacecraft?

Imagine that I board a spacecraft and head away from the Earth at top speed until I've aged twenty years, then I turn around and come back. How much younger will I be than the unexciting folk who hung ...
1
vote
2answers
219 views

Is time subjective?

In Minkowski spacetime time is subjective [or more precisely: time is different for every particle/ reference frame]. It is the coordinate time of an observer whose reference frame travels up the ...
0
votes
3answers
75 views

Is proper time an intrinsic value of Minkowski space?

What is proper time? Is it a part of Minkowski space (that is a mere spacetime interval)? Or is it an intrinsic characteristic of massive particles (a sort of "aging")? Example: In the following ...
-1
votes
1answer
83 views

Why does time dilation cause you to age slower? And is time considered relative to the observer?

I understand that the higher your velocity the slower light will move. But how does time itself slow down while you are moving faster?
10
votes
5answers
498 views

Clocks in special relativity

One book on special relativity says: Any observer at rest relative to his own timepiece will see that other clocks moving with respect to him run fast - the greater their speed, the faster they ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

How do you determine who is moving “faster” in relativity? [duplicate]

I suspect this question has a simple answer, but I can't get my head around it. The classic example of a person in orbit around the Earth at high speed experiencing a slower passage of time than the ...
0
votes
1answer
86 views

How does a black hole slow time? [duplicate]

I've been reading about black holes, and I keep coming across the fact that time runs slower near a them. My questions are: Does this mean that if you left Earth at age 30 and spent 30 years near the ...
21
votes
2answers
1k views

The age of the universe

Many times I have read statements like, "the age of the universe is 14 billion years" . For example this wikipedia page Big Bang. Now, my question is, which observers' are these time intervals? ...
2
votes
2answers
310 views

How long does it take for a black hole to form?

The well-known fable of an astronaut sending signals out to an external observer while falling toward an event horizon states that the time lapse between such signals becomes greater even if in the ...
1
vote
3answers
291 views

Why Sun light can reach us if Time is dilating?

I understand that if something is moving with constant speed in respect to an observer, the time of the moving one runs slower, so the more your speed is, the more your time ticks slower. Which ...
1
vote
2answers
239 views

Will Earth clock be slower than aeroplane clock when viewed from another planet?

I know that a clock placed on an aeroplane will have slowed with respect to a clock placed on earth because the more our velocities are, compared to the speed of light, the more the time slows down. ...
0
votes
1answer
163 views

What really happens with Time Dilation? [duplicate]

I know if you move your time moves slower than someone who is stationary, by Lorentz's transformation. However, I don't get how this happens. What does it mean when time moves slower? How does it ...
3
votes
2answers
194 views

Twin Paradox in case of two twins that don't meet

If there are two twins. such that one of them goes on a space voyage maintaining a constant velocity, and that one never returns to earth, and the twins decide to never meet but send information about ...
3
votes
2answers
143 views

Time Slowing Down [duplicate]

I'd like to ask a question if I may about the relativity. When travelling at the speed of light(which is impossible for particles with masses) or very close to it, would it be me, myself, seeing my ...
0
votes
1answer
254 views

If two observers pass each other in opposite directions at $.5c$ what would effect on each others clocks be?

Assume an alternate universe with same physical laws as here. In this universe nothing exists except 3 observers, each in a transparent box with a clock. Observer A is travelling at .5c. Observer C is ...
7
votes
2answers
202 views

Will the black hole evaporate in finite time from external observer's perspective?

There is the problem that is bothering me with the black hole evaporation because of Hawking radiation. According to Hawking theory the black hole will evaporate in finite time because of quantum ...
1
vote
4answers
297 views

What is the exact mechanism by which time dilates?

What is the exact mechanism by which time dilates for a fast moving object? Can the time dilation be explained by any theory other than relativity?
0
votes
1answer
233 views

What is the maximum time dilation between two objects, if one is standing still and the other is moving at $c$?

What is the maximum ratio in the rate of change in time in reference to object $A$ which is standing still and object $B$ which is moving at the speed of light?
1
vote
4answers
3k views

The bigger the mass, the more time slows down. Why is this?

If I were to stand by a pyramid, which weighs about 20 million tons, I would slow down by a trillion million million million of second. Don't know if that's exactly right, but you get the point. Also, ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

Does the future already exist? If so, which one?

In the NOVA Fabric of the Cosmos program, Brian Greene explains a theory in which there is no "now", or more specifically, now is relative. He describes an alien riding a bicycle on a far off planet ...
0
votes
1answer
169 views

Does photon possesses no time to cover any arbitrary distance?

Photon travel 8 minutes (with speed $c$) from the sun to reach the earth. Any particle (or space-ship) with velocity $0.99 c$ covers the same distance (93 millions km) within less than 2 minutes ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Can a black hole actually grow, from the point of view of a distant observer? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

In general relativity (GR), does time stop at the event horizon or in the central singularity of a black hole?

I was reading through this question on time and big bang, and @John Rennie's answer surprised me. In the immediate environment of a black hole, where does time stop ticking if one were to follow a ...
4
votes
2answers
359 views

Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can anything ever fall into a black hole as seen from an outside observer? Is black hole formation observable for a distant observer in finite amount of time? ...
0
votes
3answers
185 views

Time slowing down problem

When someone moves, time slows down for him. Let, a man standing still and another moving very very very fast, this happens for an hour (as measured by the standing man). Time has moved slower for the ...
8
votes
2answers
3k views

How can time be relative?

I don't understand how time can be relative to different observers, and I think my confusion is around how I understand what time is. I have always been told (and thought) that time is basically a ...
14
votes
15answers
2k views

What are the mechanics by which Time Dilation and Length Contraction occur?

What are the mechanics of time dilation and length contraction? Going beyond the mathematical equations involving light and the "speed limit of the universe", what is observed is merely a phenomenon ...
13
votes
4answers
1k views

Can black holes form in a finite amount of time?

One thing I know about black holes is that an object gets closer to the event horizon, gravitation time dilation make it move more slower from an outside perspective, so that it looks like it take an ...
18
votes
5answers
3k views

How is the classical twin paradox resolved?

I read a lot about the classical twin paradox recently. What confuses me is that some authors claim that it can be resolved within SRT, others say that you need GRT. Now, what is true (and why)?